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#25975 [Bgs->Opn]: PHP 5 object references don't survive serialization - PHP Development

ID: 25975 User updated by: reiersol at online dot no Reported By: reiersol at online dot no -Status: Bogus +Status: Open Bug Type: Session related Operating System: Linux RedHat 9.0 PHP Version: 5CVS-2003-10-24 (dev) New Comment: I guess I'll have to expand my example: class Bar { var $value = 0; } class Foo { var $v1; var $v2; function Foo() { $this->v1 = new Bar; $this->v2 = $this->v1; } } $f = new Foo; $f->v2->value = 42; var_dump($f); $g = unserialize(serialize($f)); $g->v2->value = 'and now for something completely different'; var_dump($g); Here's the output: object(foo)#1 (2) { ["v1"]=> object(bar)#2 (1) ...

  1. #1

    Default #25975 [Bgs->Opn]: PHP 5 object references don't survive serialization

    ID: 25975
    User updated by: reiersol at online dot no
    Reported By: reiersol at online dot no
    -Status: Bogus
    +Status: Open
    Bug Type: Session related
    Operating System: Linux RedHat 9.0
    PHP Version: 5CVS-2003-10-24 (dev)
    New Comment:

    I guess I'll have to expand my example:

    class Bar { var $value = 0; }
    class Foo {
    var $v1;
    var $v2;
    function Foo() {
    $this->v1 = new Bar;
    $this->v2 = $this->v1;
    }
    }

    $f = new Foo;
    $f->v2->value = 42;
    var_dump($f);
    $g = unserialize(serialize($f));
    $g->v2->value = 'and now for something completely different';
    var_dump($g);

    Here's the output:

    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#5 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    string(42) "and now for something completely different"
    }
    }

    That should at least make it clear that there's a difference in
    behavior before and after serialization. And the behavior before
    serialization is the behavior of a normal object-oriented language. (I
    ported the example to Java just to make sure I wasn't crazy.)

    I'm not trying to split hairs. I tried creating the kind of
    sophiticated object-oriented structure that PHP 5 makes so much easier.
    It worked wonderfully. But then I discovered that the structure didn't
    persist across sessions. So I made this simplified example to
    demonstrate the problem.


    Previous Comments:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-30 20:59:30] [email]sniperphp.net[/email]

    There are no references in the before serialize object, so why should
    there be references after serializing/unserializing?


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-24 08:11:44] reiersol at online dot no

    The last line of the code example (print $1) is meaningless. Sorry.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-24 08:08:59] reiersol at online dot no

    Description:
    ------------
    Object references inside PHP5 objects are not preserved through
    serialize/unserialize like traditional PHP4 references. This means they
    cannot be used in session-based applications.

    Reproduce code:
    ---------------
    class Bar {}
    class Foo {
    var $v1;
    var $v2;
    function Foo() {
    $this->v1 = new Bar;
    $this->v2 = $this->v1;
    }
    }

    $f = new Foo;
    var_dump($f);
    $g = unserialize(serialize($f));
    var_dump($g);
    print $s1;


    Expected result:
    ----------------
    This is what I get if I use $this->v2 = &this->$v1 instead of $this->v2
    = $this->v1:

    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    &object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    &object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    &object(bar)#4 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    &object(bar)#4 (0) {
    }
    }

    Actual result:
    --------------
    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#5 (0) {
    }
    }



    ------------------------------------------------------------------------


    --
    Edit this bug report at [url]http://bugs.php.net/?id=25975&edit=1[/url]
    reiersol at online dot no Guest

  2. #2

    Default #25975 [Bgs->Opn]: PHP 5 object references don't survive serialization

    ID: 25975
    User updated by: reiersol at online dot no
    Reported By: reiersol at online dot no
    -Status: Bogus
    +Status: Open
    Bug Type: Session related
    Operating System: Linux RedHat 9.0
    PHP Version: 5CVS-2003-10-24 (dev)
    New Comment:

    I realized that an even better way to test this is to use the triple
    equals sign (see
    [url]http://no.php.net/manual/en/language.oop.object-comparison-php5.php):[/url]

    var_dump($f->v1 === $f->v2);
    var_dump($g->v1 === $g->v2);

    This outputs:

    bool(true)
    bool(false)

    Based on the manual, this should mean that the two members refer to the
    same instance of the same class before serialize/unserialize, but not
    after.


    Previous Comments:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-11-01 14:04:48] cunha17 at uol dot com dot br

    C'mon sniper, just put
    $g = $f;
    instead of
    $g = unserialize(serialize($f));
    and you see that the result will be different, when, in fact, it
    shouldn't.
    That's definetly a bug.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-11-01 05:22:22] [email]sniperphp.net[/email]

    Still can't see what might be wrong here.
    The result you get is pretty much what I would expect to get..


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-31 03:42:04] reiersol at online dot no

    I guess I'll have to expand my example:

    class Bar { var $value = 0; }
    class Foo {
    var $v1;
    var $v2;
    function Foo() {
    $this->v1 = new Bar;
    $this->v2 = $this->v1;
    }
    }

    $f = new Foo;
    $f->v2->value = 42;
    var_dump($f);
    $g = unserialize(serialize($f));
    $g->v2->value = 'and now for something completely different';
    var_dump($g);

    Here's the output:

    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#5 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    string(42) "and now for something completely different"
    }
    }

    That should at least make it clear that there's a difference in
    behavior before and after serialization. And the behavior before
    serialization is the behavior of a normal object-oriented language. (I
    ported the example to Java just to make sure I wasn't crazy.)

    I'm not trying to split hairs. I tried creating the kind of
    sophiticated object-oriented structure that PHP 5 makes so much easier.
    It worked wonderfully. But then I discovered that the structure didn't
    persist across sessions. So I made this simplified example to
    demonstrate the problem.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-30 20:59:30] [email]sniperphp.net[/email]

    There are no references in the before serialize object, so why should
    there be references after serializing/unserializing?


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-24 08:11:44] reiersol at online dot no

    The last line of the code example (print $1) is meaningless. Sorry.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The remainder of the comments for this report are too long. To view
    the rest of the comments, please view the bug report online at
    [url]http://bugs.php.net/25975[/url]

    --
    Edit this bug report at [url]http://bugs.php.net/?id=25975&edit=1[/url]
    reiersol at online dot no Guest

  3. #3

    Default #25975 [Bgs->Opn]: PHP 5 object references don't survive serialization

    ID: 25975
    User updated by: reiersol at online dot no
    Reported By: reiersol at online dot no
    -Status: Bogus
    +Status: Open
    Bug Type: Zend Engine 2 problem
    Operating System: Linux RedHat 9.0
    PHP Version: 5CVS-2003-10-24 (dev)
    New Comment:

    Opening the bug again


    Previous Comments:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-11-04 01:23:53] reiersol at online dot no

    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    string(42) "and now for something completely different"
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    string(42) "and now for something completely different"
    }
    }

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-11-04 00:28:17] [email]sniperphp.net[/email]

    Add the missing expected result to your last example.




    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-31 03:42:04] reiersol at online dot no

    I guess I'll have to expand my example:

    class Bar { var $value = 0; }
    class Foo {
    var $v1;
    var $v2;
    function Foo() {
    $this->v1 = new Bar;
    $this->v2 = $this->v1;
    }
    }

    $f = new Foo;
    $f->v2->value = 42;
    var_dump($f);
    $g = unserialize(serialize($f));
    $g->v2->value = 'and now for something completely different';
    var_dump($g);

    Here's the output:

    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    int(42)
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#5 (1) {
    ["value"]=>
    string(42) "and now for something completely different"
    }
    }

    That should at least make it clear that there's a difference in
    behavior before and after serialization. And the behavior before
    serialization is the behavior of a normal object-oriented language. (I
    ported the example to Java just to make sure I wasn't crazy.)

    I'm not trying to split hairs. I tried creating the kind of
    sophiticated object-oriented structure that PHP 5 makes so much easier.
    It worked wonderfully. But then I discovered that the structure didn't
    persist across sessions. So I made this simplified example to
    demonstrate the problem.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [2003-10-24 08:08:59] reiersol at online dot no

    Description:
    ------------
    Object references inside PHP5 objects are not preserved through
    serialize/unserialize like traditional PHP4 references. This means they
    cannot be used in session-based applications.

    Reproduce code:
    ---------------
    class Bar {}
    class Foo {
    var $v1;
    var $v2;
    function Foo() {
    $this->v1 = new Bar;
    $this->v2 = $this->v1;
    }
    }

    $f = new Foo;
    var_dump($f);
    $g = unserialize(serialize($f));
    var_dump($g);
    print $s1;


    Expected result:
    ----------------
    This is what I get if I use $this->v2 = &this->$v1 instead of $this->v2
    = $this->v1:

    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    &object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    &object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    &object(bar)#4 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    &object(bar)#4 (0) {
    }
    }

    Actual result:
    --------------
    object(foo)#1 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#2 (0) {
    }
    }
    object(foo)#3 (2) {
    ["v1"]=>
    object(bar)#4 (0) {
    }
    ["v2"]=>
    object(bar)#5 (0) {
    }
    }



    ------------------------------------------------------------------------


    --
    Edit this bug report at [url]http://bugs.php.net/?id=25975&edit=1[/url]
    reiersol at online dot no Guest

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