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Advice sought on old SCO Unix system - Linux / Unix Administration

Hi, I'd like to ask for help. We're a young company running a crucial application under SCO Unix V/386 Rel 3.2 v4.2 on an old PC. We did have two systems -- one as a backup but it has just died. That leaves us very vulnerable but we don't have money or manpower to move to an entirely new system just yet. We're also lacking a working copy of the OS -- old, dead distribution media ... My question is this: is there any way of 'cloning' our remaining system to another machine (even if we have to find/buy old ...

  1. #1

    Default Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    Hi, I'd like to ask for help. We're a young company running a crucial
    application under SCO Unix V/386 Rel 3.2 v4.2 on an old PC. We did have
    two systems -- one as a backup but it has just died. That leaves us
    very vulnerable but we don't have money or manpower to move to an
    entirely new system just yet. We're also lacking a working copy of the
    OS -- old, dead distribution media ...

    My question is this: is there any way of 'cloning' our remaining system
    to another machine (even if we have to find/buy old hardware to do so)?

    OR might our applications run under a more modern version of
    Unix/Linux, with moderate tweaking? Given the code runs on an Intel box
    (386), would it run on more 'modern' hardware?

    I'm pretty OK with software, hardware, Windows, etc., but not so
    familiar with Unix. I'd be happy to dig/learn/spend a reasonable amount
    of money on sorting out a short-term solution to tide us over until we
    can migrate to a newer system. I'd be VERY grateful for any advice.

    DemonBuilder Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    DemonBuilder wrote: 
    [...] 

    A shot in the dark: http://netbsd.gw.com/cgi-bin/man-cgi?compat_ibcs2

    Regards

    ND
    Nino Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    Thanks for your quick response Nino. I've just had a quick look at the
    link you mentioned. Presumably the idea is to obtain and set up NetBSD
    on a PC and run iBCS2 to emulate the SCO environment, hopefully
    enabling us to run our application. Is that right?



    DB

    Nino Dehne wrote: [/ref]
    crucial 
    > [...] [/ref]
    box 
    >
    > A shot in the dark: http://netbsd.gw.com/cgi-bin/man-cgi?compat_ibcs2
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > ND[/ref]

    DemonBuilder Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    DemonBuilder wrote: 

    Yes. This should work if your app is not reliant on very specific kernel
    features. For example, I use NetBSD's compat_linux to run an anti-virus
    scanner which integrates with the native Postfix just nicely.

    Actually, I'm a bit suspicious about the combination of "young company",
    "crucial app on ancient UNIX" and "no money or manpower to migrate" with
    "no OS media" on top of that.

    I wish you luck, anyway.

    ND
    Nino Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    DemonBuilder <net> wrote: 
     
     

    Most Opensource un*x runs SCO-code by an "emulation-kit". You might need
    SCO-libraries, but you already own the right to these(as you have
    a valis sco-license right?).

    BSD/OS did SCO emulation, FreeBSD does, Linux most likley does.

    Why don't you locate an knowledgebal consultant, install an un*x
    from the above set, and tries to copy your app there ?

    If you have trouble contacting i knew that www.freebsd.org has a listing
    of "consultants" that might help.
     

    If you are located in the scandinavia area i would be more then happy
    to assist ...


    --
    Peter Håkanson
    IPSec Sverige ( At Gothenburg Riverside )
    Sorry about my e-mail address, but i'm trying to keep spam out,
    remove "icke-reklam" if you feel for mailing me. Thanx.
    phn@icke-reklam.ipsec.nu Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    On 12 Dec 2004 12:33:15 -0800, DemonBuilder <net> wrote: 

    Ouch. Your boss needs to spend some money, and soon.
     

    Smartass, non-helpful answer: "Call SCO". Slightly less smartass,
    potentially helpful answer, "learn how to use dd and/or dump/restore and
    dupe what you have". I assume you have backups, if not, then that should
    be your TOP priority, right now. Get the backups running, and restore
    onto a new system. That gets you a good backup/restore setup, gives
    you the disaster recovery that you _desperately_ need right now, and
    gets you migrated to hardware made during this century.
     

    Probably. Maybe vmware would be a useful thing to use for this - run the
    SCO system _within_ a linux or windows system, as a virtual machine.
    vmware's hardware abstraction layer is _very_ good.
     

    man dump
    man ufsdump (I doubt it)
    man tar

    I don't speak SCO, and they're not held in high regard in the industry
    these days for obvious reasons, but one or more of these should do. If
    you need a SCO guru to talk to, I know a guy, and my email does work.

    Dave Hinz

    Dave Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    Thanks for your suggestions everyone -- they are much appreciated. It
    looks like I have quite a few avenues to explore, and I have my fingers
    crossed! :o)

    DemonBuilder

    DemonBuilder Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    DemonBuilder wrote: 
    This is not unusual for Unix. There are usually two or more ways to do
    anything.

    I am a Linux user but for a job like this I normally recommend one of
    the BSDs because they are designed from the ground up (and then reviewed
    back down to the ground and re-implemented as needed back to the top
    again) as server platforms and because they rival SCO in it's
    near-legendary stability and uptime. Another advantage is that they
    have an internal consistency in program naming and doentation that is
    not matched in Linux and thus the learning curve will be less steep. I
    am unaware of the internals of SCO so I don't know how they compare to
    it in that respect.

    My impression is that FreeBSD has the edge in stability, OpenBSD in
    variety of platforms supported and NetBSD in security. This is partly
    subjective and partly the stated design goal of each version. They
    should all have iBCS-2 functionality and don't need even middle of the
    road hardware to be functional, much less high end equipment.
    Nonetheless good hardware will serve you the longest and most reliably
    and can be had for a reasonable cost.

    Good luck with your project.

    Lynn
    Lynn Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    Begin <BE0wd.7503$E_6.4850trnddc04>
    On 2004-12-15, Lynn <net> wrote:
    [snippety] 

    (<ObPedant> I'd write that ``*BSDs'' since BSD itself is distinct and
    mostly of historical interest now </>)


    [snip!] 

    I think you mixed up OpenBSD and NetBSD here. FreeBSD I'd say has its
    edge more in sheer amount of Stuff in its ported applications collection,
    as well as support for i386 hardware (notably network drivers) and lots
    of doentation. But anyway. I think I'd try NetBSD first, then try and
    find out about FreeBSD 4.* (10, currently) and iBCS2. Even if FreeBSD is
    a bit easier to install. My experience is that both are not hard if you
    a) have an idea what is going on with peecees and their bootprocess and
    b) read the installation notes very carefully, preferrably twice, before
    your first install.


    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    jpd Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    jpd wrote: 
    >
    >
    > (<ObPedant> I'd write that ``*BSDs'' since BSD itself is distinct and
    > mostly of historical interest now </>)
    >
    >
    > [snip!]

    >
    >
    > I think you mixed up OpenBSD and NetBSD here. FreeBSD I'd say has its
    > edge more in sheer amount of Stuff in its ported applications collection,
    > as well as support for i386 hardware (notably network drivers) and lots
    > of doentation. But anyway. I think I'd try NetBSD first, then try and
    > find out about FreeBSD 4.* (10, currently) and iBCS2. Even if FreeBSD is
    > a bit easier to install. My experience is that both are not hard if you
    > a) have an idea what is going on with peecees and their bootprocess and
    > b) read the installation notes very carefully, preferrably twice, before
    > your first install.
    >
    >[/ref]
    Thank you for your comments. I defer to your experience and knowledge
    in this area. I haven't really kept up with it for some time and may be
    relying on old information and mixing up some details as well.

    Lynn
    Lynn Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    Ok. Best product for SCO backups - ctar ( or lone-tar - its' cousin ).
    SCO 3.2.4.2 is very old now. You may not be able to get a version of
    ctar for it. Having said that, IF your application is yours and you
    don't need to buy a license to run it, maybe you can find someone to
    "co-locate" the app for you. If you find someone who would allow you
    to keep a copy of your application available as a stand-by, and maybe
    you could do it for them. Maybe they would ask some small monthly
    fee - considering a ligitimate SCO license and newer hardware might
    break the bank just now.

    On RedHat Linux there was a neat tool which would run SCO binaries. It
    was called ibcs or something like it. I ran it very successfully on
    RedHat 6, and I think it goes under a new name now.

    Good Luck.





    Lynn wrote: [/ref][/ref]
    of 
    > >
    > >
    > > (<ObPedant> I'd write that ``*BSDs'' since BSD itself is distinct[/ref][/ref]
    and [/ref][/ref]
     
    > >
    > >
    > > I think you mixed up OpenBSD and NetBSD here. FreeBSD I'd say has[/ref][/ref]
    its [/ref]
    collection, [/ref]
    lots [/ref]
    try and [/ref]
    FreeBSD is [/ref]
    you [/ref]
    and [/ref]
    before 
    > Thank you for your comments. I defer to your experience and[/ref]
    knowledge 
    be 

    glbny@yahoo.com Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Advice sought on old SCO Unix system

    On Thu, 2005-01-27 at 13:52 -0800, com wrote: 

    Intel Binary Compatibility System (or something like that). I know it
    has been used to run a copy of Oracle 7.2 on Linux.

    I believe it's still around, and not limited to RH.
    --
    Once, I read that a man be never stronger than when he truly realizes
    how
    weak he is.
    -- Jim Starlin, "Captain Marvel #31"


    S. Guest

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