Professional Web Applications Themes

[All States] Camra's - Photography

On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 08:37:37 GMT, Bill Bolton <billbolton*remove*computer.org> wrote:   > >It most certainly does. >[/ref] Have a look at the figures for grain and resolution for the following fuji films Film Grain (RMS) Resolution ( 1000:1) lines/mm RDPIII 8 140 RAP 10 135 RVP 9 160 It sort of puts a lie to what you say as we can see a film with a granularity of 8 resolves less than a film with a granularity of 9 You should learn to read an MTF curve   > >You didn't put any limitation on either technology in your ...

  1. #1

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 08:37:37 GMT, Bill Bolton
    <billbolton*remove*computer.org> wrote:
     
    >
    >It most certainly does.
    >[/ref]
    Have a look at the figures for grain and resolution for the following
    fuji films

    Film Grain (RMS) Resolution ( 1000:1) lines/mm
    RDPIII 8 140
    RAP 10 135
    RVP 9 160

    It sort of puts a lie to what you say as we can see a film with a
    granularity of 8 resolves less than a film with a granularity of 9

    You should learn to read an MTF curve

     
    >
    >You didn't put any limitation on either technology in your sweeping
    >pronoucement, so its no good trying to wriggle out of it by setting
    >arbitary limits after the fact!
    >[/ref]
    I asked you a question but yet you did not anwser it!!!

    You can use a 22megapixel Digital back on a 6x4.5 but film will still
    resolve more . The Laws of physics still apply
     
    But does it beat films like Technical pan in resolving power?? It
    think not!!! None of the reviews you point to back up your argument.
    in any way shape of form
     [/ref]

    >
    >[/ref]
    Didn't you read the url I posted??

    I will give it to you again.
    http://www.crystalcanyons.net/Pages/TechNotes/FilmVsCP5000.shtm

    Greg Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    Greg Rudd <usyd.edu.au> wrote:
     

    "Puts a lie to what you say"... there you go again trying to change
    the playing field to wriggle out of your own statements. I've never
    made any claims about grain versus resolution, that's your hobby
    horse.

    You were the one that claimed that film has the ability to capture
    "infinite information", which is just rubbish. There are definite
    limits to the amount of information that can be recorded by film and
    the information limit is directly related to grain size. Resolution
    is NOT information.
     

    <sigh>

    The answer to your question is that I was not "telling you" anything
    about 4 mega pixel CCDs, or resolving power in lines per inch, or film
    stock characteristics.
     

    Expect it seems where the information capacity storage of film is
    concerned.
     
    [Snip] 

    Cleraly you didn't bother to read the I posted. The answer for a 35mm
    file format is that yes, it most certainly does.

    But that wasn't the point.
     

    That's all too clear!

    Bill


    Bill Bolton
    Sydney, Australia
    Bill Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 23:57:48 GMT, Bill Bolton
    <billbolton*remove*computer.org> wrote:
     
    >
    >"Puts a lie to what you say"... there you go again trying to change
    >the playing field to wriggle out of your own statements. I've never
    >made any claims about grain versus resolution, that's your hobby
    >horse.[/ref]

    You was the one that said that resolution is effected by grain not me.
    as evidenced in your previous post. Hence the table of data to prove
    your point was wrong. Interesting to note how that was deleted from
    your reply.
     

    Read the table above the resolving power of a film means the amount of
    information that can be stored. For example Technical Pan can resolve
    more details hence more information is stored on the that film than
    say Fuji RDPIII. It is infinate compared to a CCD. 
    >
    ><sigh>
    >
    >The answer to your question is that I was not "telling you" anything
    >about 4 mega pixel CCDs, or resolving power in lines per inch, or film
    >stock characteristics.
    >[/ref]
    But you said that digital resolves better film. when I put some
    examples to you seem that you dont want to answer the question. And
    you still dont.
     
    >
    >Expect it seems where the information capacity storage of film is
    >concerned.

    >[Snip] 
    >
    >Cleraly you didn't bother to read the I posted. The answer for a 35mm
    >file format is that yes, it most certainly does.[/ref]

    I am quitely confident that Technical pan can out resolve any CCD at
    the moment in any film format.

    Greg Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    Greg Rudd <usyd.edu.au> wrote:
     
    > >
    > >"Puts a lie to what you say"... there you go again trying to change
    > >the playing field to wriggle out of your own statements. I've never
    > >made any claims about grain versus resolution, that's your hobby
    > >horse.[/ref]
    >
    > You was the one that said that resolution is effected by grain not me.
    > as evidenced in your previous post.[/ref]

    Lets see...
     [/ref]
     

    "Resolving power" (which is unbounded) becomes "resolution" (which has
    specific bounded meaning in film terms) as if by magic. I suppose I
    shouldn't have expected any better from you.
     

    Ah, I finally understand! You are just thick.

    Bill


    Bill Bolton
    Sydney, Australia
    Bill Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 13:51:28 +1000, David Johnson
    <com.au> wrote:
     
    >
    >I could retrieve them from my CD copy. Or, one of the CD copies I
    >have located at other locations.[/ref]
    Which are likely to last about 15 years due to the dies breaking down 

    You must be going crap-house mini-labs if that is the case . Shows
    you how much you value your stuff then.
    Greg Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    With the tone of your message what are you trying to infer?

    That photographers, archivists, librarians and historians have not thought
    about the permanence of whatever media their collections are on?

    That when digitising material the permanence or lack of is part not of their
    strategy

    Reformatting of collections takes into account shifting and progressive
    technologies, even the most basic strategy incorporates the transference of
    data from old media to new and the reformatting of data from old file
    formats to new as technologies and media change.

    The lifespan of media becomes a non issue with intelligently managed
    material.



    on 17/10/03 2:59 PM, Greg Rudd plugged away at a keyboard and wrote:
     
    > Which are likely to last about 15 years due to the dies breaking down[/ref]

    --

    Glenn McCarter

    Digital Lucida
    http://www.digital-lucida.com.au
    478 - 480 Rathdowne St
    Carlton North Vic 3054
    Australia
    Ph. (03) 9349 5159
    Fx . (03) 9349 5153

    Glenn Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 04:08:17 GMT, Bill Bolton the gunzel
    <billbolton*remove*computer.org> wrote:
     
    >>
    >> You was the one that said that resolution is effected by grain not me.
    >> as evidenced in your previous post.[/ref]
    >
    >Lets see...
    > [/ref]

    >
    >"Resolving power" (which is unbounded) becomes "resolution" (which has
    >specific bounded meaning in film terms) as if by magic. I suppose I
    >shouldn't have expected any better from you

    >
    >Ah, I finally understand! You are just thick.
    >[/ref]

    I see that you are such an expert on the subject, so I must take it
    that you are a professional photogapher!!!.
    Greg Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 14:59:56 +1000, Greg Rudd <usyd.edu.au>
    wrote:
     
    >Which are likely to last about 15 years due to the dies breaking down[/ref]

    Burn a a copy of your CDs ever 10 years and you'll be fine.


    Albert Alcoceba
    <><
    ihug.com.au
    http://www.racysrailway.com/
    Remove REMOVE
    Albert Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: [All States] Camra's

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 14:59:56 +1000, Greg Rudd <usyd.edu.au>
    wrote:
     
    >>
    >>I could retrieve them from my CD copy. Or, one of the CD copies I
    >>have located at other locations.[/ref]
    >Which are likely to last about 15 years due to the dies breaking down 
    >
    >You must be going crap-house mini-labs if that is the case . Shows
    >you how much you value your stuff then.[/ref]

    Not really. Accidents happen. By removing the lab from the equation,
    that is one less place for things to go wrong.

    For the record, the majority of my stuff is shot on an og Minolta,
    but I acknowledge that digital is getting better every day. I usually
    carry a digital Nikon with me for shots that I want to use quickly, or
    i don't want to pay to get developed.

    David Johnson
    com.au
    http://www.trainman.id.au
    ------------------------------------
    These comments are made in a private
    capacity and do not represent the
    official view of State Rail.
    C.O.W.S. Page 11.
    David Guest

Similar Threads

  1. Question about states
    By dimival in forum Macromedia Flex General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 21st, 03:33 PM
  2. Transitions between states
    By Wally Kolcz in forum Macromedia Flex General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: June 2nd, 05:21 PM
  3. [PHP] states
    By Gilbert Dumont in forum PHP Development
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 29th, 07:12 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139