Professional Web Applications Themes

another novice(very novice!) needs help - Macromedia Freehand

This is not exactly a freehand thing,but I need help here.I f igured someone who's good at freehand generally understands stuff about handling images,and might be able(if inclined) to help. I knwo that what determines an images size(in terms of pixels and bytes),is the resolution(if it's a digital image) and it's original physical size(if it's a scanned image),as well as the resolution at which it's scanned. Now,I work in a photo studio(in Kenya),and we'll hortly be taking peole's photos for using to enter the American immagrant visa lottery thing.They require a picture that's 240 pixels wude and 320 pixels high.Yhet ...

  1. #1

    Default another novice(very novice!) needs help

    This is not exactly a freehand thing,but I need help here.I f igured someone who's good at freehand generally understands stuff about handling images,and might be able(if inclined) to help.
    I knwo that what determines an images size(in terms of pixels and bytes),is the resolution(if it's a digital image) and it's original physical size(if it's a scanned image),as well as the resolution at which it's scanned.
    Now,I work in a photo studio(in Kenya),and we'll hortly be taking peole's photos for using to enter the American immagrant visa lottery thing.They require a picture that's 240 pixels wude and 320 pixels high.Yhet also specify that the image cannot be larger than 62.5KB.reviously,entries used to be sent by snail mail,and the photo required was 2" square.Now all entries are being sent elcronically,and if one is to scan a photo,the photo to be scanned should be 2" squared,scanned at a resolution of 150dpi.
    My question to you is,what exactly is the relationship between an image's pixel size and it's actual physical size,both on the screen(if you had a flat display and measured it with a ruler)and when you print it?I'm asking this because to reach their specifications,you can crop an image that's too large to reduce the pixel size,and it works fine.But you could also reduce the resolution setting on the camera you're using,such that while he image is now not being cropped(reduction in physical size as you see it)it meets the required size(I don't even know if the word size here has any more meaning).
    I'm worried that we may end up sending photos that while meeting the required pixel dimensions and file size,they are either not sharp enough,or they are too small(physically).I'm imagining that there's something they are trying to achieve,some sort of balance between file size and resolution,when they give the specs they've given.
    If I knew what was going on,I'd probably be in a position to figure out what to do.Now I'm totally lost,and here is hoping that someone can help.
    Oh,and the picture must be a JPEG.Not GIF,TIFF or whatever else is out there.


    tewodros webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    tewodros wrote:
    > My question to you is,what exactly is the relationship between an image's
    > pixel size and it's actual physical size,both on the screen(if you had a flat
    > display and measured it with a ruler)and when you print it?
    Take a look at this article:
    [url]http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/intermediate/a/measure_ppi.htm[/url]

    Judy Arndt

    Judy Arndt Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    > My question to you is,what exactly is the relationship between an image's
    > pixel size and it's actual physical size,both on the screen(if you had a
    flat
    > display and measured it with a ruler)and when you print it?
    The pixel size merely tells you how many pixels are in the image.

    The print size is entirely dependant on what size you choose to print it at.

    They are not related in any way, other than one needs a certain amount of
    pixels to produce a decent looking image at a certain size.

    So, if your image is 100 pixels x 100 pixels, you can print it at any size
    you want. If you print it at 1"x1", on paper, it will be 1" square with a
    resolution of 100dpi.

    If you print it 10" x 10", it will be 10" sqaure with a resolution of 10ppi
    (and rather ugly looking ;o)

    As a digital file, it has no physical size. It's just a bunch of pixels. It
    doesn't have an actual physical size until you print it. The DPI settings in
    graphics applications don't affect the PPI at all. They are just the default
    size it will be printed at from that particular application.

    Anyways, just do what they requested. Make the image 240x320 pixels. You can
    set the default print size in your application to 2" if you want (it will be
    a DPI setting in FW), but that's really irrelevant. Then, just save it as a
    JPG with enough compression to bring it under the file size limitation.


    darrel Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    > The DPI settings in
    > graphics applications don't affect the PPI at all.
    This should say "the PPI settings don't affect the actual pixel
    dimensions at all" - there is no such thing as DPI for a digital image,
    and PPI is not the same thing as actual pixels.

    Brian Pylant Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    > This should say "the PPI settings don't affect the actual pixel
    > dimensions at all" - there is no such thing as DPI for a digital image,
    > and PPI is not the same thing as actual pixels.
    Umm...very good point. Thanks for the correction. Yes, PPI is only affected
    by the physical dimensions of the screen and for the most part is
    irrelevant.


    darrel Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    I guess when someone brings a photo to be scanned,we won't have a problem,coz we'll just take the photo(it's size is specified,2" by 2")and scan it at the specified scanning resolution.No problem there.
    The problem is the digital photo.The camera we're using has a minimum resolution of 480 by 640,and what we're limited to is a lot less than that.
    You'll probably wonder what a guy who doesn't know this is doing on freehand forum,but what then is a pixel?
    I think there's something I'm missing,and until I can figure it out,this will continue to be very confusing.But thanks for trying to help.


    tewodros webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    > The problem is the digital photo.The camera we're using has a minimum
    resolution of 480 by 640,and what we're limited to is a lot less than that.

    Take the picture. Open it in Fireworks (Or photoshop, or whatever image
    editor you have).

    Resize and/or crop it so that it is 240x320 (50% reduction in each axis). If
    there is a print dimension setting, set that as 2". Export as JPG.

    Done.

    -Darrel


    darrel Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: another novice(very novice!) needs help

    OK.I'll do that.I have fireworks,plus MGI Photuite.
    Thanks all.
    And hopefully,when I get better at these things(I'm learning freehand,dreamweaver),I'll be able to ask questions that fit this league.


    tewodros webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

Similar Threads

  1. Help please, novice
    By discgolf in forum Macromedia Flash Player
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 28th, 12:52 AM
  2. Novice in php help please
    By steve103 in forum Macromedia Dynamic HTML
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 1st, 10:35 PM
  3. Novice
    By Ross Jordan in forum Macromedia Flex General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: August 19th, 05:20 PM
  4. Novice !!!
    By N3rZhuL in forum Macromedia Flash
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 11th, 02:40 PM
  5. Help for a novice, Please!
    By Andrew in forum Microsoft SQL / MS SQL Server
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 3rd, 07:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139