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anyone here tonight? Need jpgs, please - Adobe Photoshop Elements

Hi, anyone who is here tonight. I am helping to test for a problem with mail attachments that may be caused by EXIF data in jpgs. But since I don't shoot digital I don't have any pix with EXIF data to use for testing. Can somebody send me a jpg or two that still has EXIF data in it, please? [email]bbseasidemusic.com[/email]. Thanks....

  1. #1

    Default anyone here tonight? Need jpgs, please

    Hi, anyone who is here tonight. I am helping to test for a problem with mail attachments that may be caused by EXIF data in jpgs. But since I don't shoot digital I don't have any pix with EXIF data to use for testing. Can somebody send me a jpg or two that still has EXIF data in it, please?

    [email]bbseasidemusic.com[/email]. Thanks.
    Barbara Brundage Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: anyone here tonight? Need jpgs, please

    Barbara Brundage wrote:
    > Hi, anyone who is here tonight. I am helping to test for a problem with mail attachments that may be caused by EXIF data in jpgs. But since I don't shoot digital I don't have any pix with EXIF data to use for testing. Can somebody send me a jpg or two that still has EXIF data in it, please?
    >
    > [email]bbseasidemusic.com[/email]. Thanks.

    I may be a day late and a dollar short here, but I've had a look at the
    "innards" of a jpeg that contains EXIF data from my digital camera, and
    I think I've figured out where a possible e-mail attachment headache may
    occur.


    A "normal" jpeg contains the tag "JFIF" in bytes 7, 8, 9 and 10 of the
    file while the jpeg from my camera has the tag "Exif" in the same
    position. The "Exif" file also contains a lot more readable text at the
    start of the file than does the standard "JFIF" type file.

    Because "Exif" is not a recognized MIME type and the extensive text at
    the start of the file, e-mail tools don't necessarily recognize the
    picture as being a binary file and don't encode it properly for sending,
    thus "bending, folding, mutilating and stapling" the result.

    The only, reasonably sure, way of getting around this is to archive the
    file using something like Stuffit, PKZip or WinZip. This will encase
    the image in something the e-mail tool recognizes as being binary and
    the result will be properly encoded for transmission. If you're not
    sure what platform the recipient(s) are using, then I would suggest
    using "zip" format, as I haven't met a platform yet that can't handle
    it. Not all MS-Windows or *nix users can handle a native Stuffit file.

    If you still need examples of files with Exif data, contact me directly
    or leave a note here in the newsgroup and I'll zip some up and send them
    to you.

    HTH

    Kyle

    Kyle Guest

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