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Backup Restoration Procedure - SCO

Currently have SCO Enterprise 5.0.6 running with some production software installed. The company who installed the server created a System menu which allowed the backup of the system with the following script. tape rewind /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 15000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/boot /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 1999000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/root /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 6200000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/u tape rewind Can anyone tell me how to restore a tape created using this. (Step by step instructions would be good as I have tried a number of ways with very little success.) Also can someone tell me what switches the cbackup uses when placing the cpio command into the crontab? ...

  1. #1

    Default Backup Restoration Procedure

    Currently have SCO Enterprise 5.0.6 running with some production
    software installed.
    The company who installed the server created a System menu which
    allowed the backup of the system with the following script.

    tape rewind
    /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 15000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/boot
    /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 1999000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/root
    /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 6200000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/u
    tape rewind

    Can anyone tell me how to restore a tape created using this.
    (Step by step instructions would be good as I have tried a number of
    ways with very little success.)

    Also can someone tell me what switches the cbackup uses when placing
    the cpio command into the crontab? I may be able to use this info to
    back track and create a resoration procedure. I am a bit of a newbie
    to unix so the simpler the better.

    Thanks in advance

    Martin
    Martin Roclawski Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Backup Restoration Procedure

    Martin Roclawski wrote:
    > Currently have SCO Enterprise 5.0.6 running with some production
    > software installed.
    > The company who installed the server created a System menu which
    > allowed the backup of the system with the following script.
    >
    > tape rewind
    > /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 15000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/boot
    > /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 1999000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/root
    > /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 6200000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/u
    > tape rewind
    >
    > Can anyone tell me how to restore a tape created using this.
    > (Step by step instructions would be good as I have tried a number of
    > ways with very little success.)
    Well, if memory serves, cbackup produces a CPIO archive with a leading
    dot (eg, ./usr/fred) and offers the ability to create differential (or
    incremental) backups of files changed since last backup.

    I think a quick "cpio -itv < /dev/nrStp0" will tell.

    Concerning the restore procedure, it's simply a matter of using cpio
    with the "-i" (and others) flag.

    I'd be interesting to know the tests you're unsuccessfully performed
    though ...

    Apropos, I noticed you're using /dev/nrStp0; is that intentional ? I
    know that you can store several CPIO/TAPE archives on a single tape
    using the no-rewind interface but what if a tape gets damaged ? Are you
    willing to take such a risk ?
    >
    > Also can someone tell me what switches the cbackup uses when placing
    > the cpio command into the crontab? I may be able to use this info to
    > back track and create a resoration procedure. I am a bit of a newbie
    > to unix so the simpler the better.
    Try with "crontab -l" executed as user "root".

    Best,
    Rob

    --
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    Roberto Zini email : r.zini<AT>strhold.it
    Technical Support Manager -- Strhold Evolution Division R.E. (ITALY)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Has anybody around here seen an aircraft carrier?"
    (Pete "Maverick" Mitchell - Top Gun)

    Roberto Zini Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Backup Restoration Procedure

    Thanks for the reply; answers / questions below.

    Roberto Zini <r.zini_removeme_strhold.it> wrote in message
    news:3F0A7DAE.9080700strhold.it...
    > Martin Roclawski wrote:
    > > Currently have SCO Enterprise 5.0.6 running with some production
    > > software installed.
    > > The company who installed the server created a System menu which
    > > allowed the backup of the system with the following script.
    > >
    > > tape rewind
    > > /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 15000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/boot
    > > /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 1999000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/root
    > > /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 6200000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/u
    > > tape rewind
    > >
    > > Can anyone tell me how to restore a tape created using this.
    > > (Step by step instructions would be good as I have tried a number of
    > > ways with very little success.)
    >
    > Well, if memory serves, cbackup produces a CPIO archive with a leading
    > dot (eg, ./usr/fred) and offers the ability to create differential (or
    > incremental) backups of files changed since last backup.
    >
    > I think a quick "cpio -itv < /dev/nrStp0" will tell.
    >
    > Concerning the restore procedure, it's simply a matter of using cpio
    > with the "-i" (and others) flag.
    Have tried that but am unsure if the flags I am using are the correct ones
    to extract a CPIO created by cbackup?
    The command I used was "cpio -ivf -I </dev/rct0". This was before I
    stummbled across the script above and now appreciate I should have used the
    nrStp0 to prevent rewind.
    >
    > I'd be interesting to know the tests you're unsuccessfully performed
    > though ...
    After numerous attempts to extract the archive I finally got the follow to
    work, or should I say what I thought was working.
    Booted from a boot and root floppy set.
    then entered the following commands as root.
    mount /dev/hd0root /mnt
    cd /mnt
    cpio -ivf -I </dev/rct0

    This appeared to get a full file system. However if i tried to add a modem
    or network card the relink fell over.
    Also when we tried to restore some more recent data, using a 3rd party's
    software, the file permissions were all wrong. (Not sure this is linked to
    the same problem but it seems coincidental).
    >
    > Apropos, I noticed you're using /dev/nrStp0; is that intentional ? I
    > know that you can store several CPIO/TAPE archives on a single tape
    > using the no-rewind interface but what if a tape gets damaged ? Are you
    > willing to take such a risk ?
    >
    I believe it is intentional as the one tape then has the three file systems
    which would allow a full restore.
    I think that I should be restoring the second two file systems also.
    If so, how do a mount the boot file system and the u filesystem to allow me
    to restore the additional two archives? or am I missing the point??
    > >
    > > Also can someone tell me what switches the cbackup uses when placing
    > > the cpio command into the crontab? I may be able to use this info to
    > > back track and create a resoration procedure. I am a bit of a newbie
    > > to unix so the simpler the better.
    >
    > Try with "crontab -l" executed as user "root".
    Will try this next time I am on the system.
    >
    > Best,
    > Rob
    >
    > --
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Roberto Zini email : r.zini<AT>strhold.it
    > Technical Support Manager -- Strhold Evolution Division R.E. (ITALY)
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > "Has anybody around here seen an aircraft carrier?"
    > (Pete "Maverick" Mitchell - Top Gun)
    >

    DMG FirstNet Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Backup Restoration Procedure

    DMG FirstNet wrote:
    > Thanks for the reply; answers / questions below.
    >
    > Roberto Zini <r.zini_removeme_strhold.it> wrote in message
    > news:3F0A7DAE.9080700strhold.it...
    >
    >>Martin Roclawski wrote:
    >>
    >>>Currently have SCO Enterprise 5.0.6 running with some production
    >>>software installed.
    >>>The company who installed the server created a System menu which
    >>>allowed the backup of the system with the following script.
    >>>
    >>>tape rewind
    >>>/usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 15000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/boot
    >>>/usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 1999000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/root
    >>>/usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup 0 6200000 /dev/nrStp0 /dev/u
    >>>tape rewind
    >>>
    >>>Can anyone tell me how to restore a tape created using this.
    >>>(Step by step instructions would be good as I have tried a number of
    >>>ways with very little success.)
    >>
    >>Well, if memory serves, cbackup produces a CPIO archive with a leading
    >>dot (eg, ./usr/fred) and offers the ability to create differential (or
    >>incremental) backups of files changed since last backup.
    >>
    >>I think a quick "cpio -itv < /dev/nrStp0" will tell.
    >>
    >>Concerning the restore procedure, it's simply a matter of using cpio
    >>with the "-i" (and others) flag.
    >
    Before proceeding with your message, might I suggest you the adoption of
    a commercial backup software such as LoneTar or BackupEdge ? Both of 'em
    provide superior backup and restore capabilities which help you out when
    dealing with missing/lost files and system crash (not to mention that
    they are a lot FASTER than their tar/cpio counterparts).

    Dunno about LoneTar ([url]www.cactus.com[/url]) but BackupEdge comes with a 60 days
    evaluation period which allows you to fully taste its potential.
    >
    > Have tried that but am unsure if the flags I am using are the correct ones
    > to extract a CPIO created by cbackup?
    > The command I used was "cpio -ivf -I </dev/rct0". This was before I
    > stummbled across the script above and now appreciate I should have used the
    > nrStp0 to prevent rewind.
    >
    >
    >>I'd be interesting to know the tests you're unsuccessfully performed
    >>though ...
    >
    >
    > After numerous attempts to extract the archive I finally got the follow to
    > work, or should I say what I thought was working.
    > Booted from a boot and root floppy set.
    > then entered the following commands as root.
    > mount /dev/hd0root /mnt
    > cd /mnt
    > cpio -ivf -I </dev/rct0
    >
    > This appeared to get a full file system. However if i tried to add a modem
    > or network card the relink fell over.
    > Also when we tried to restore some more recent data, using a 3rd party's
    > software, the file permissions were all wrong. (Not sure this is linked to
    > the same problem but it seems coincidental).
    >
    Well, I don't think cpio will be able to create directories without the
    "-d" flag; what if you restore a directory which contains other subfolders ?

    If I were you, I'd experiment with the following syntax:

    cd /mnt
    cpio -idvku < /dev/rStp0

    Also, before proceeding with the restore, PLEAEE have a look at the
    archive with the "cpio -itv < /dev/rStp0" command. You might be required
    to specify a pattern which tells CPIO the files to restore. Eg:

    cd /usr
    cpio -idvku < /dev/rStp0 "fred/mydata/*"
    >
    >>Apropos, I noticed you're using /dev/nrStp0; is that intentional ? I
    >>know that you can store several CPIO/TAPE archives on a single tape
    >>using the no-rewind interface but what if a tape gets damaged ? Are you
    >>willing to take such a risk ?
    >>
    >
    >
    > I believe it is intentional as the one tape then has the three file systems
    > which would allow a full restore.
    OK, but if you store all the above filesystems on a single tape and that
    tape plays up, then your entire backup will be pretty useless !

    Also, don't forget to verify the archive once it's been written to the
    tape device; I've witnessed several customers who, after carefully
    performing regular backups, ended up having to perform a complete OS
    reinstall since the data couldn't get extracted from the data (I/O error).

    Again, commercial thirdy part backup software will do that for you ...
    > I think that I should be restoring the second two file systems also.
    > If so, how do a mount the boot file system and the u filesystem to allow me
    > to restore the additional two archives? or am I missing the point??
    From where ? The emergency floppies ?

    The boot filesystem is available via the /dev/boot device so a simple

    mount /dev/boot /mnt/stand

    will suffice.

    As an example, if you want to restore a complete OS5 system from the
    boot floppies:

    .. check with fdisk & divvy that partitions & filesystems are OK
    .. mount /dev/hd0root /mnt/
    .. mount /dev/boot /mnt/stand
    .. if you have additional filesystems (eg, /dev/u) mount 'em as well (eg,
    mount /dev/u /mnt/u)
    .. cd /mnt
    .. cpio -ivBcdum < /dev/rStp0

    Mind you that the last step assumes you have backed up your data with the

    find . -print | cpio -ovBcdum > /dev/rStp0

    command.

    Once you're done, umount the filesystems, check 'em with "fsck" and if
    you want to make the disk bootable, give the following commands:

    .. /bin/dparam -w
    .. /bin/dd if=/etc/hdboot0 of=/dev/hd0a
    .. /bin/dd if=/etc/hdboot1 of=/dev/hd0a bs=1k seek=1

    Reboot the system and you'll be fine.
    >
    >
    >>>Also can someone tell me what switches the cbackup uses when placing
    >>>the cpio command into the crontab? I may be able to use this info to
    >>>back track and create a resoration procedure. I am a bit of a newbie
    >>>to unix so the simpler the better.
    >>
    >>Try with "crontab -l" executed as user "root".
    >
    >
    > Will try this next time I am on the system.
    >
    >
    Hope this helps !

    Best,
    Rob
    --
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    Roberto Zini email : r.zini<AT>strhold.it
    Technical Support Manager -- Strhold Evolution Division R.E. (ITALY)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Has anybody around here seen an aircraft carrier?"
    (Pete "Maverick" Mitchell - Top Gun)

    Roberto Zini Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Backup Restoration Procedure

    Martin Roclawski wrote:
    > Thanks Rob for your comments so far
    >
    No problem.

    [snip]
    >>
    >>Also, before proceeding with the restore, PLEASE have a look at the
    >>archive with the "cpio -itv < /dev/rStp0" command. You might be required
    >>to specify a pattern which tells CPIO the files to restore. Eg:
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    > Have done this but am unsure of what I should be looking at as the file fly
    > past.
    >
    Well, I think a simple

    cpio -itv < /dev/rStp0 | more

    will allow you to have a look at the files as they fly past. Also, you
    can use the following:

    script /tmp/files.txt
    cpio -itv < /dev/rStp0
    CTRL-D

    Thus making you'll create a log of the cpio session into the
    /tmp/files.txt file; use your favourite editor to check the file out.

    [munch]
    >>
    >>OK, but if you store all the above filesystems on a single tape and that
    >>tape plays up, then your entire backup will be pretty useless !
    >
    >
    >
    > We perform periodic unattended backups therefore one tape is necessary
    >
    OK, that's your funeral :-)
    >
    >
    >>Also, don't forget to verify the archive once it's been written to the
    >>tape device; I've witnessed several customers who, after carefully
    >>performing regular backups, ended up having to perform a complete OS
    >>reinstall since the data couldn't get extracted from the data (I/O error).
    >
    >
    >
    > May have to add this into the script if we decide to stick with the cbackup
    > method.
    >
    As an example, you can "hack" cbackup as to perform something like this:

    tape rewind
    dd if=/dev/rStp0 | cpio -itvn && echo "Success"
    >>
    >>>I think that I should be restoring the second two file systems also.
    >>>If so, how do a mount the boot file system and the u filesystem to allow
    >>
    > me
    >
    >>>to restore the additional two archives? or am I missing the point??
    >>
    >> From where ? The emergency floppies ?
    >
    >
    >
    > The second two archive files ont the tape???
    >
    >
    >
    >>The boot filesystem is available via the /dev/boot device so a simple
    >>
    >>mount /dev/boot /mnt/stand
    >
    >
    >
    > If I have booted form a floppy set wiull this not mount that file system?
    Yes, it will mount the BOOT filesystem, which is the part of your HD
    from which the kernel is booted; mind you that this is __NOT__ the root
    filesystem, which is the slice where OS vital data (such as init, getty,
    the protected database and so on) resides on.
    > Should I therefore restore the first archive, which is root, reboot the
    > system mount the boot and u then restore the final two archives?
    >
    I think this will be only a waste of time; while you're operating using
    the boot/root floppies, mount the BOOT filesystem __AND__ the ROOT
    filesystem (and any additional filesystem you might have); then, by
    following the procedure I outlined in my previous message, restore one
    filesystem at a time (using the no-rewind tape archive) and you'll be
    (hopefully) done.

    Have a great WE,
    Roberto

    --
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    Roberto Zini email : r.zini<AT>strhold.it
    Technical Support Manager -- Strhold Evolution Division R.E. (ITALY)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Has anybody around here seen an aircraft carrier?"
    (Pete "Maverick" Mitchell - Top Gun)

    Roberto Zini Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Backup Restoration Procedure

    Roberto,

    Thanks for all your help.

    I have managed to restore the full system intact!!! Something I never
    thought I'd say!!

    I had fun with the fact that the script used to create the archive stores
    the filesystems in the following order

    boot
    root
    u

    The SCO book I have says to restore root then boot. I therefore had to
    create a new emergency floppy set which included the /bin/usr/tape file to
    allow me to rewind and move to file marks. I wasn't sure whether it would
    make a difference in the long run but though I would stick to the SCO
    method.

    There is one final question.

    I still have a few niggles to do with registration of the system. I
    currently have a different server ID to one that created the backup archive.
    I therefore am assuming it uses something to do with the hard disk to
    generate this value as the rest of the system hasn't changed. Does this mean
    I have to register the system again or is it possible to manually override
    this ID???

    Thanks again

    Martin


    Martin Roclawski Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Backup Restoration Procedure

    In article <3f1bb1f8$1news.userve.net> "Martin Roclawski" <m.roclawskiXremoveXdenisonmayesgroup.com> writes:
    $I still have a few niggles to do with registration of the system. I
    $currently have a different server ID to one that created the backup archive.
    $I therefore am assuming it uses something to do with the hard disk to
    $generate this value as the rest of the system hasn't changed. Does this mean
    $I have to register the system again or is it possible to manually override
    $this ID???

    Re-register. I don't know exactly what it is that is used to generate
    the system ID, and I suspect SCO will never say for fear that someone will
    use it to cirvent their registration system. But it seems to have
    something to do with partitioning the hard drive or creating the root
    filesystem or something like that.

    When you go to re-register your software, you'll get to a Web page
    that says that your software has already been registered, and it will
    ask you to say why you're registering again. One of the choices is
    something like "reinstalling system" and if you pick that option
    it will generate a new activation key for you. SCO is aware that
    once in a while a system will crash or need to be migrated to a better
    computer, so you're OK here.
    --
    Stephen M. Dunn <stephenstevedunn.ca>
    >>>----------------> [url]http://www.stevedunn.ca/[/url] <----------------<<<
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Say hi to my cat -- [url]http://www.stevedunn.ca/photos/toby/[/url]
    Stephen M. Dunn Guest

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