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Basics - Installing Applications - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13 on my laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft. I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like, idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in ...

  1. #1

    Default Basics - Installing Applications

    I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13 on my
    laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft.

    I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like,
    idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat
    Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in it).

    How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where the
    application is, or how to run it?
    Kortoom Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    Kortoom <tomlombardocomcast.net> wrote:
    > I don't understand how to install an application.

    There is no general rule.
    > I want to get
    > StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    Get what they say to get and do what they say to do to it.
    > free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    > to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    Why don't you know how to run files? What's the problem?
    > How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    I don't understand .. the same way as you would run any file. Make sure
    it's marked as executable (chmod +x sdm.sh), and call it (/tmp/sdh.sh,
    or whatever).
    > application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where the
    > application is, or how to run it?
    Why would you care where the application is? You'd run it by calling
    its name, since it will be in your PATH.

    Peter
    Peter T. Breuer Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    In article <792b0fd5.0308102219.139add88posting.google.com >, Kortoom wrote:
    > I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    > StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    > free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    Normally you install RPM packages on Red Hat. Some packages are different,
    and then you'll just unpack the archive you downloaded and read the
    README, hoping it is well written.

    You don't need Sun's download manager, just get the package. Getting
    StarOffice involves paying Sun, have you done that? If you have, ask help
    from their tech support. If not, get OpenOffice.
    > to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    > understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like,
    > idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat
    > Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in it).
    I don't know what the RH Bible is like, but it hardly covers installing
    StarOffice, Netscape or Quake3. These commercial packages have their own
    help files.

    --
    Juha Siltala
    Juha Kustaa Siltala Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    Kortoom wrote:
    > I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13 on my
    > laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft.
    >
    > I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    > StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    > free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    > to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    > understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like,
    > idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat
    > Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in it).
    >
    > How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    > application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where the
    > application is, or how to run it?
    You're running RedHat 8.0. You should already *have* OpenOffice
    installed, or available on your installation media or from your RedHat
    8.0 mirror site.

    You run a file like "sdm.sh" by typing "/bin/sh dm.sh". Unfortunately,
    vendors that provide binary installation packages (such as StarOffice)
    tend to have their own little special installation tools. Read the
    "README" files with the software and do what *it* says....

    Nico Kadel-Garcia Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    Kortoom wrote:
    > I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13
    > on my laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft.
    >
    > I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    > StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their
    > little
    > free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know
    > how to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I
    > really understand how to install an application without a
    > Microsoft-like,
    > idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my
    > RedHat Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything
    > in it).
    >
    > How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    > application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where
    > the application is, or how to run it?
    Reading your post I think you won't get much help from here since
    you seem to lack some fundamental computer skills. I don't mean
    that as an insult, it's just hard to communicate all the
    necessary background in a news group. Probably you should get
    yourself an easy introduction about Linux like 'Linux for
    Dummies' (again no offence) and then give it a new try. Probably
    you should even consider to stay with MS unless you're willing to
    learn a lot of new stuff and you're prepared for a temporary loss
    of productivity.

    HTH,
    Ransom
    Ransom Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications


    "Kortoom" <tomlombardocomcast.net> wrote in message
    news:792b0fd5.0308102219.139add88posting.google.c om...
    > I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13 on my
    > laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft.
    >
    > I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    > StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    > free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    > to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    > understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like,
    > idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat
    > Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in it).
    >
    > How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    > application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where the
    > application is, or how to run it?
    I figured you might want a non- comment. If the linux community is ever
    going to grow, people need to be nicer to the new guys.

    Many times, applications will come with a Readme file that will explain
    detailed instructions on how to install it. Read through this file, and
    follow all the instructions. Other times, you'll see an install.sh file or
    some other script that will install it automatically. To execute this, open
    up a terminal, navigate to the directory you have it stored in, and:
    $ ./install.sh

    Commands in linux work much like DOS/Windows as far as executing. You merely
    type the filename in to execute. The only difference here is that you're
    telling it to look in the current directory (./) for the file install.sh,
    and then execute it. To execute a file in your home directory, it would be
    ~/ instead of ./ and for a file in the directory below it would be ../

    So, this will get you started. You may open up an editor to see what the
    install script is doing. Type "pico install.sh", where install.sh is the
    correct script. You can see what is actually going on.

    As far as where it's stored, it doesn't really matter, so long as you set
    your path to there. Common places are /bin/ and /usr/bin/. System-related
    files are in /sbin/ and /usr/sbin/. You'll pick up more as time goes on. To
    know exactly where the files installed, check out the manual pages ("man
    <programname>") and see if it lists it there. If not, then check out the
    doentation or readme file, or even the website.

    It's actually more intuitive than Windows as you will be able to tell. All
    you have to do is execute a script, it does the rest. Eventually, you'll
    want to pass options to the install, or edit the script to suit your own
    needs. For now, just run it like it is.

    Good luck!


    David Harris Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 12:26:17 -0400, David Harris <gte972zmail.gatech.edu> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kortoom" <tomlombardocomcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:792b0fd5.0308102219.139add88posting.google.c om...
    >> I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13 on my
    >> laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft.
    >>
    >> I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    >> StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    >> free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    >> to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    >> understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like,
    >> idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat
    >> Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in it).
    >>
    >> How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    >> application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where the
    >> application is, or how to run it?
    >
    > I figured you might want a non- comment. If the linux community is ever
    > going to grow, people need to be nicer to the new guys.
    >
    > Many times, applications will come with a Readme file that will explain
    >
    Nice, David. And if you learn to install apps this way, you can delete what-
    ever fancy package manager your distro uses and free up tons of space and
    system resources...

    Alan


    --
    For Linux/Bash users: Eliminate spam with the Mailbox-Sentry-Program.
    See: [url]http://tinyurl.com/inpd[/url] for the scripts and docs.

    Alan Connor Guest

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  12. #12

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    On 13 Aug 2003 11:38:20 -0700, Xyerp <Xyerphotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Well yes, a good point and a bad point. I'd really rather know exactly
    > what changes have just happened during my upgrade, rather than just
    > being blinded by someone elses package manager. Who knows what I have
    > done to my (taking an example) apache configuration? Maybe I'm a dirty
    > hacker ;P heh. But yeah, sometimes I don't want to know all that, and
    > just chuck the guff in any ol' where. Heh. Just as long as I have the
    > choice...

    I like knowing exactly what's going on, and to be able to optimize the
    install for my setup.
    As for applications that are so complex and huge that this is impractical?
    I do my best to find several smaller and specialized ones that cover the
    same territory.

    Package managers are like the "locate" tool/db. All you need is to use "find"
    in several simple scripts and you've freed up a lot of space and have a
    lot more control.


    Alan C.

    Alan Connor Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    Hi there

    I am a newbie using Linux

    I understand quite clearly the first guy who posted

    Don't knock the guy otherwise he and many others will just stay with Bill
    Gates

    Linux is strange to say the least and installing files is for the moment
    complicated

    I downloaded Mozilla and that was Ok as there was a "install me" file but
    then I tried AMSN and still have not be able to install it, just don't
    understand how to, even though I was able to un zip it

    Have bought the book for 'Linux for Dummies' which helps but ..... as
    someone rightl suggested

    Using XP is a piece of cake I build my own PCs so I don't think that I ama
    dummy, but please give us newbies a break and be patient with us

    Trevor





    "David Harris" <gte972zmail.gatech.edu> a écrit dans le message de
    news:bhb482$nns$1news-int.gatech.edu...
    >
    > "Kortoom" <tomlombardocomcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:792b0fd5.0308102219.139add88posting.google.c om...
    > > I'm using RedHat Linux 8.0, KDE 3.0.3-8, and Konqueror 3.0.3-13 on my
    > > laptop now, having abandoned everything Microsoft.
    > >
    > > I don't understand how to install an application. I want to get
    > > StarOffice from Sun, but I can't even install and run their little
    > > free download manager. I can unzip their file, but I don't know how
    > > to "run" the file they indicate for installation, nor do I really
    > > understand how to install an application without a Microsoft-like,
    > > idiot proof wizard. I can't get a straight answer out of my RedHat
    > > Linux Bible (which looks like it ought to gave everything in it).
    > >
    > > How do you "run" a file like "sdm.sh" or "sdm.bat" to install an
    > > application? Assuming the install works, how do you know where the
    > > application is, or how to run it?
    >
    > I figured you might want a non- comment. If the linux community is
    ever
    > going to grow, people need to be nicer to the new guys.
    >
    > Many times, applications will come with a Readme file that will explain
    > detailed instructions on how to install it. Read through this file, and
    > follow all the instructions. Other times, you'll see an install.sh file or
    > some other script that will install it automatically. To execute this,
    open
    > up a terminal, navigate to the directory you have it stored in, and:
    > $ ./install.sh
    >
    > Commands in linux work much like DOS/Windows as far as executing. You
    merely
    > type the filename in to execute. The only difference here is that you're
    > telling it to look in the current directory (./) for the file install.sh,
    > and then execute it. To execute a file in your home directory, it would be
    > ~/ instead of ./ and for a file in the directory below it would be ../
    >
    > So, this will get you started. You may open up an editor to see what the
    > install script is doing. Type "pico install.sh", where install.sh is the
    > correct script. You can see what is actually going on.
    >
    > As far as where it's stored, it doesn't really matter, so long as you set
    > your path to there. Common places are /bin/ and /usr/bin/. System-related
    > files are in /sbin/ and /usr/sbin/. You'll pick up more as time goes on.
    To
    > know exactly where the files installed, check out the manual pages ("man
    > <programname>") and see if it lists it there. If not, then check out the
    > doentation or readme file, or even the website.
    >
    > It's actually more intuitive than Windows as you will be able to tell. All
    > you have to do is execute a script, it does the rest. Eventually, you'll
    > want to pass options to the install, or edit the script to suit your own
    > needs. For now, just run it like it is.
    >
    > Good luck!
    >
    >

    Shazbot Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    In article <3f3bc032$0$16163$626a54cenews.free.fr>, Shazbot wrote:
    > then I tried AMSN and still have not be able to install it, just don't
    > understand how to, even though I was able to un zip it
    amsn, if I remember correctly, is nothing but a tcl/tk script. You don't
    install it, just run the executable.

    --
    Juha Siltala
    Juha Kustaa Siltala Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    Hello again

    Managed to run the script, but took three days just to understand and some
    help from another posting, a scipt is complety unknown to us simple Win
    folks, even now that I have been able to run it I still have not been able
    to create a alias so that I can run it from the bureau, everytime I have to
    use a terminal CD etc etc , thats a lot for a simple script/progam

    I suspect that a lot af people try linux but go back to Windows after a
    while

    Linux = Steep very steep learning curve Phew;;.....


    "Juha Kustaa Siltala" <jsiltalacc.helsinki.fi> a écrit dans le message de
    news:slrnbjng7h.8do.jsiltalakruuna.Helsinki.FI...
    > In article <3f3bc032$0$16163$626a54cenews.free.fr>, Shazbot wrote:
    >
    > > then I tried AMSN and still have not be able to install it, just don't
    > > understand how to, even though I was able to un zip it
    >
    > amsn, if I remember correctly, is nothing but a tcl/tk script. You don't
    > install it, just run the executable.
    >
    > --
    > Juha Siltala

    Shazbot Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    In article <3f3ca9da$0$1114$626a54cenews.free.fr>, Shazbot wrote:
    > Managed to run the script, but took three days just to understand and some
    > help from another posting, a scipt is complety unknown to us simple Win
    > folks, even now that I have been able to run it I still have not been able
    You can write batch files on DOS. Unix scripts are a vaguely similar
    concept, just done better.
    > to create a alias so that I can run it from the bureau, everytime I have to
    > use a terminal CD etc etc , thats a lot for a simple script/progam
    You need to read some doentation I guess.
    > I suspect that a lot af people try linux but go back to Windows after a
    > while
    I'm sure they do. Some other folks learn their way around, stay and enjoy.

    --
    Juha Siltala
    Juha Kustaa Siltala Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 11:37:36 +0200, Shazbot wrote:
    > Hello again
    >
    > Managed to run the script, but took three days just to understand and some
    > help from another posting, a scipt is complety unknown to us simple Win
    > folks, even now that I have been able to run it I still have not been able
    > to create a alias so that I can run it from the bureau, everytime I have to
    > use a terminal CD etc etc , thats a lot for a simple script/progam
    >
    > I suspect that a lot af people try linux but go back to Windows after a
    > while
    >
    > Linux = Steep very steep learning curve Phew;;.....
    >
    >
    > "Juha Kustaa Siltala" <jsiltalacc.helsinki.fi> a écrit dans le message de
    > news:slrnbjng7h.8do.jsiltalakruuna.Helsinki.FI...
    >> In article <3f3bc032$0$16163$626a54cenews.free.fr>, Shazbot wrote:
    >>
    >> > then I tried AMSN and still have not be able to install it, just don't
    >> > understand how to, even though I was able to un zip it
    >>
    >> amsn, if I remember correctly, is nothing but a tcl/tk script. You don't
    >> install it, just run the executable.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Juha Siltala
    Hi,

    I am a newbie to linux as well.
    I learned from the step to Linux that I really didn't know anything about
    Windows either.
    The best thing to do is,
    - FORGET HOW IT WAS DONE UNDER WINDOWS ( it is probably different with
    Linux and you only confuse yourself )
    - READ the HowTo's ... that is a tricky one ..don't understand half of it.
    - Admit to yourself that you're a newbie and don't forget to mention it if
    you post a question. There are Linux users who are happy to help you get
    started with Linux.
    - READ a lot !! .. there are good newbie sites that explane the basics.
    Those simple basics are what gets you going.
    - Most Linux users are "command line" users and expect that the commands
    are present in the distribution.
    - Windows users on the other hand think that you only can change things in
    the graphical interface and that you need to purchace a special program
    for it.

    I advice you to do some basic reading on the simple stuff how to start a
    program, how to copy files, how to find things, why all programs have
    man(ual) pages and how to use them ( and you will need them )
    .... stupid things like that.

    [url]http://www.linux.org/lessons/beginner/toc.html[/url] is a nice place to start.
    .... It helped me to understand ...

    Rolf








    R@LF Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    In article <pan.2003.08.15.10.46.55.791737home.nl>, RLF wrote:
    > - Most Linux users are "command line" users and expect that the commands
    > are present in the distribution.
    Most answers to questions in Linux newsgroups give the solution in shell
    commands, because it's the most generic way and will apply to most/all
    systems. Different distros have different graphical setup programs, but
    the shell commands probably will work.

    Of course, newbies tend not to mention their distribution and other system
    information, or they say they have "Linux 9.1" installed on an "Athlon
    box" with an "onboard sound card" :)

    In addition, when talking about Samba setup for example, we don't know if
    someone has SWAT installed but we do know they will have a smb.conf file
    on their system. Therefore it's best to talk about this file instead of
    SWAT settings. As for file editing advice, it's best to use vi commands
    because it's likely to be present on every system.

    It doesn't mean most users are "command line users" when setting up their
    own systems. It just means giving as generic information as possible, to
    benefit the largest possible number of people. As you say, the it's safe
    to assume that certain "commands are present", while it's useless to talk
    about the Mandrake Control Center or Webmin when we don't know if they're
    there.

    --
    Juha Siltala
    Juha Kustaa Siltala Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Basics - Installing Applications

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 12:31:21 +0000, Juha Kustaa Siltala wrote:
    > In article <pan.2003.08.15.10.46.55.791737home.nl>, RLF wrote:
    >
    >> - Most Linux users are "command line" users and expect that the commands
    >> are present in the distribution.
    >
    > Most answers to questions in Linux newsgroups give the solution in shell
    > commands, because it's the most generic way and will apply to most/all
    > systems. Different distros have different graphical setup programs, but
    > the shell commands probably will work.
    >
    > Of course, newbies tend not to mention their distribution and other system
    > information, or they say they have "Linux 9.1" installed on an "Athlon
    > box" with an "onboard sound card" :)
    >
    > In addition, when talking about Samba setup for example, we don't know if
    > someone has SWAT installed but we do know they will have a smb.conf file
    > on their system. Therefore it's best to talk about this file instead of
    > SWAT settings. As for file editing advice, it's best to use vi commands
    > because it's likely to be present on every system.
    >
    > It doesn't mean most users are "command line users" when setting up their
    > own systems. It just means giving as generic information as possible, to
    > benefit the largest possible number of people. As you say, the it's safe
    > to assume that certain "commands are present", while it's useless to talk
    > about the Mandrake Control Center or Webmin when we don't know if they're
    > there.
    While I used Windows (speaking for myself of course) I did not even know
    what chipsets / kernel version / logfiles / debug-options / ... (etc.)
    were. Most of the time you don't need to know.
    If you ask a question in these linux groups, everyone is asking for
    distro's, logfiles, installed drivers, etc.
    If you don't know how to find these, you don't get a clear answer to your
    question (or none at all).
    The easiest way - sometimes the only way - to find these is via the
    command line. That is my expirience at least.

    So, if someone wants to install anything, it's good to know how to check
    where the files went and what is required to start/customize the
    application. Most of the time, it will NOT magically show up in your menu
    like it does in Windows.
    When I started with Linux, I could not even check if it wás installed in
    the first place. I did not have a clue where to look.
    I think, you are in big trouble if you think that it will be the same as
    Windows.

    My advice is learn how to use the command line first !!
    For "most", that will be a new experience.

    Rolf
    R@LF Guest

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