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Beginner's Camera Question - Photography

I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help would be greatly appreciated. I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a professional photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are really good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a Kodak Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no manual controls to speak of. As ...

  1. #1

    Default Beginner's Camera Question

    I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    would be greatly appreciated.

    I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a professional
    photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are really
    good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a Kodak
    Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to really
    become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a point-and-shoot,
    or is it necessary to have an SLR?


    David L Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    David L wrote:
    > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a professional
    > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are really
    > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a Kodak
    > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to really
    > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a point-and-shoot,
    > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    >
    >
    You can learn the basics of composition with any camera. I have seen
    some very good pictures taken with point and shoot cameras. Once you
    have developed your photographic vision to a certain point (and you will
    know when that is), then you will probably want to "step up" to a camera
    with more creative control.

    Bill Williams Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question


    "David L" <FlashPoint222charter.net> wrote in message
    news:vjvebkdma438b4corp.supernews.com...
    > My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    point-and-shoot,
    > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    Take good photos, yes, develop and mature - probably needs a more mature
    camera.

    Gary Eickmeier


    Gary Eickmeier Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question



    Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > I agree with Bill. You can do just find with what you have. You can
    > learn a lot. You can learn many of the most important parts of photography.
    >
    > Photography is an art. Many photo artist work with all the manual
    > controls they can to control every single part of the image. Others choose
    > to use a more automatic camera like the one you have
    Not quite, although they might use aperture or shutter priority, and at times
    use an offset from that. I often use aperture priority, and sometimes use
    an offset.
    > and learn to use that
    > camera to produce what they want preferring to devote more of their effort
    > on the subject and less on the equipment. Both are artist and both can
    > produce great images.
    >
    > If you find you are restricted by your camera, then it is time to
    > consider another. Don't let someone else's needs make your decisions for
    > you. That said, I do recommend that you spend at least some time learning
    > the workings of digital imaging. That way you will know what the
    > capabilities of the media is and what your tools can do.
    >
    > Good Luck
    >
    > --
    > Joseph E. Meehan
    >
    > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    >
    > "David L" <FlashPoint222charter.net> wrote in message
    > news:vjvebkdma438b4corp.supernews.com...
    > > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > > would be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a
    > professional
    > > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are
    > really
    > > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a
    > Kodak
    > > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    > > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to
    > really
    > > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    > point-and-shoot,
    > > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    > >
    > >
    JK Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question



    Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > I agree with Bill. You can do just find with what you have. You can
    > learn a lot. You can learn many of the most important parts of photography.
    >
    > Photography is an art. Many photo artist work with all the manual
    > controls they can to control every single part of the image. Others choose
    > to use a more automatic camera like the one you have
    Not quite, although they might use aperture or shutter priority, and at times
    use an offset from that. I often use aperture priority, and sometimes use
    an offset.
    > and learn to use that
    > camera to produce what they want preferring to devote more of their effort
    > on the subject and less on the equipment. Both are artist and both can
    > produce great images.
    >
    > If you find you are restricted by your camera, then it is time to
    > consider another. Don't let someone else's needs make your decisions for
    > you. That said, I do recommend that you spend at least some time learning
    > the workings of digital imaging. That way you will know what the
    > capabilities of the media is and what your tools can do.
    >
    > Good Luck
    >
    > --
    > Joseph E. Meehan
    >
    > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    >
    > "David L" <FlashPoint222charter.net> wrote in message
    > news:vjvebkdma438b4corp.supernews.com...
    > > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > > would be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a
    > professional
    > > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are
    > really
    > > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a
    > Kodak
    > > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    > > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to
    > really
    > > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    > point-and-shoot,
    > > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    > >
    > >
    JK Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    David L wrote:
    > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a professional
    > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are really
    > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a Kodak
    > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to really
    > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a point-and-shoot,
    > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    >
    >
    Yes, this is a good place to start. You can use the P&S camera to learn
    the basics of composition and style, and to see if you have any talent
    in this area. If not, then you aren't out too much money. If you do,
    then you can move to a camera that allows more 'creative opportunity'
    after you learn all you can with this camera. With all those
    photographers in the family, you shouldn't have too much trouble getting
    good advice.


    Ron Hunter Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    And, as an added bonus, while you are learning the basics with your point
    and shoot, the price of the slr's are going to be dropping like a rock. I
    have my purchase penciled in for two years from now, and in the meantime I
    have a lot of fun with composition and leaning photoshop. I have found, for
    myself, most of the shots I want are opportunistic, and I leave my coolpix
    in auto mode, only occasionaly switching to manual when I have time and a
    subject that stays put.
    Marggi
    "Ron Hunter" <rphuntercharter.net> wrote in message
    news:naQ%a.33962$9P1.7964fe11.atl2.webusenet.com. ..
    > David L wrote:
    >
    > > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > > would be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a
    professional
    > > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are
    really
    > > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a
    Kodak
    > > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel,
    a
    > > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to
    really
    > > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take
    good
    > > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    point-and-shoot,
    > > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Yes, this is a good place to start. You can use the P&S camera to learn
    > the basics of composition and style, and to see if you have any talent
    > in this area. If not, then you aren't out too much money. If you do,
    > then you can move to a camera that allows more 'creative opportunity'
    > after you learn all you can with this camera. With all those
    > photographers in the family, you shouldn't have too much trouble getting
    > good advice.
    >
    >

    Marggi Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    You do have some manual controls with the LS443 take the time and learn how
    to use what you have. I have seen award winning photos taken with a point &
    shoot camera. You need to develop that instinct of what is a good picture
    and how to get it. What a better tool than having a digital camera where you
    can see the results only moments after you take the exposure. Search old
    photo books many of the rules and techniques still apply. Do you know what
    type of photographer you want to be? what types of subjects you want to
    shoot? these questions may help you decide what camera to use.

    Good luck

    Gary
    "Marggi" <PHILANDnospamMARGGIworldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:OvQ%a.103798$0v4.7242990bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > And, as an added bonus, while you are learning the basics with your point
    > and shoot, the price of the slr's are going to be dropping like a rock. I
    > have my purchase penciled in for two years from now, and in the meantime I
    > have a lot of fun with composition and leaning photoshop. I have found,
    for
    > myself, most of the shots I want are opportunistic, and I leave my coolpix
    > in auto mode, only occasionaly switching to manual when I have time and a
    > subject that stays put.
    > Marggi
    > "Ron Hunter" <rphuntercharter.net> wrote in message
    > news:naQ%a.33962$9P1.7964fe11.atl2.webusenet.com. ..
    > > David L wrote:
    > >
    > > > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any
    help
    > > > would be greatly appreciated.
    > > >
    > > > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of
    my
    > > > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a
    > professional
    > > > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are
    > really
    > > > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a
    > Kodak
    > > > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4
    megapixel,
    > a
    > > > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > > > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to
    > really
    > > > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been
    a
    > > > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take
    > good
    > > > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    > point-and-shoot,
    > > > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > Yes, this is a good place to start. You can use the P&S camera to learn
    > > the basics of composition and style, and to see if you have any talent
    > > in this area. If not, then you aren't out too much money. If you do,
    > > then you can move to a camera that allows more 'creative opportunity'
    > > after you learn all you can with this camera. With all those
    > > photographers in the family, you shouldn't have too much trouble getting
    > > good advice.
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    Gary J Bevans Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    I am going to offer you my ywo sense, as an amateaur photographer like
    yourself.

    You may have made a mistake choosing the camera you did, not because it
    isn't and SLR, but because it lacks manual controls. You would probably have
    been happier with a camera like the Canon G3 or something similar, which
    offers all the funtionality of an SLR minus the interchngalble lenses and
    abilty to use ISO ratings over 400 or so. That said, you sure as hell can
    have fun with any reasonably good quality digicam.

    As for buying a digital SLR, in my opinion, unless you are a porfessional
    photogrpaher, or simply have deep pockets, now is not the time to buy.
    Digital SLRS are still very expensive, and thouge the Canon 10D has
    pehonmenal image quality, even at ISO 1600, it is still an immature product,
    with crop factors et al. The Olympus E-1 was supposed to be the first
    solution to this, but so far it looks like it is a little overpriced for
    what it offers (and it offers a lot, just not as much as the price commands)



    "David L" <FlashPoint222charter.net> wrote in message
    news:vjvebkdma438b4corp.supernews.com...
    > I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a
    professional
    > photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are
    really
    > good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a
    Kodak
    > Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    > couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to
    really
    > become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    point-and-shoot,
    > or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    >
    >

    Jonathan Timar Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    In message <vjvebkdma438b4corp.supernews.com>,
    "David L" <FlashPoint222charter.net> wrote:
    >My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    >photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a point-and-shoot,
    >or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    These aren't the only types of digfital cameras available. There are
    many that aren't SLRs, but still have full manual control, as well as
    aperture and shutter priority modes, as well as options for long
    exposure, and the ability to add adapters and filters.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <JPSno.komm>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
    JPS@no.komm Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question

    On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 14:29:12 -0400, JK <JK9821netcape.net> wrote:
    >> I agree with Bill. You can do just find with what you have. You can
    >> learn a lot. You can learn many of the most important parts of photography.
    >> Photography is an art. Many photo artist work with all the manual
    >> controls they can to control every single part of the image. Others choose
    >> to use a more automatic camera like the one you have
    >
    >Not quite, although they might use aperture or shutter priority, and at times
    >use an offset from that. I often use aperture priority, and sometimes use
    >an offset.
    Now wait just a minute...how can you say "Not quite"? Are you
    personally acquainted with every single one of those "Others", and
    know all their photographic practices and techniques? I'm sure there
    are some serious amateurs or professionals who use totally automatic
    cameras much of the time. To say "Not Quite" is ludricous.

    But if you want to get down right technical, his comment said "Other
    choose to use a MORE automatic camera like the one you have"...which
    could mean that it's AP or SP or totally Programmed Exposure or some
    variant of all those.

    I consider myself a serious amateur, and I have used my gear all the
    way from completely manual, without using a meter, and making pretty
    darn good exposure guesses, all the way through all the various
    metered, partially and fully automatic exposure settings. Different
    situations call for different techniques. A great deal of it depends
    on WHO is shooting, WHAT is being shot, HOW it's being show, WHERE
    it's being shot, and with what equipment and cirstances that happen
    to be taking place.
    Slingblade Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Beginner's Camera Question


    "Slingblade" <bladeREMOVEslingerearthREMOVElink.net> wrote in message
    news:f3q3kv85c8n3udqfm11jk54k5qm0o7fga64ax.com...
    > On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 12:20:50 -0500, "David L"
    > <FlashPoint222charter.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a small question about what is possible with my camera, any help
    > >would be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > >I recently bought a point-and-shoot camera, at the urging of some of my
    > >friends and with a curiosity about photography. My grandpa is a
    professional
    > >photographer, my mom is a gifted amateur, and some of my friends are
    really
    > >good (amateur) photographers. So in the name of curiosity, I bought a
    Kodak
    > >Easyshare LS443 digital camera. It's a good, solid camera, 4 megapixel, a
    > >couple of nice bells and whistles, but it's a point-and-shoot, with no
    > >manual controls to speak of. As soon as I got the camera I started to
    really
    > >become interested in photography, and realized an SLR might have been a
    > >better choice. My question is this: Do you think one can really take good
    > >photographs and develop and mature as a photographer with a
    point-and-shoot,
    > >or is it necessary to have an SLR?
    >
    > The only thing that is "necessary" to photography is a camera.
    > Although you won't learn a lot about exposure with a point-n-shoot,
    > you certainly could work on composition, and after awhile if you're
    > still interested, then perhaps you could move up to something with
    > more control. In the meantime, you could go to your public library
    > and check out a few books on photography composition and technique, as
    > well as some about the mechanics of photography and cameras
    > themselves, to help familiarize yourself with equipment and
    > photography in general.
    >
    > Perhaps you could borrow a good SLR from your mother or friends and
    > see how you like it.
    Funny you should say that...I was just talking to my mom today, and she has
    an SLR that she is willing to let me borrow. Thanks a lot for the input,
    everybody.


    David L Guest

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