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Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6 - SCO

Hello all, We are embarking on a project to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6, to Linux. I just wanted to get some opinions on which flavor of linux would be the best to port to. First, the background info and requirements. We don't need the latest and greatest technology, we just need a stable environment for our Point of Sale system. The benefits of going to linux would be to continue finding any needed drivers and integrating any additional hardware into our system. For example, most of our devices are serial devices, ie. upc scanner, cash drawer, handheld scanner etc. If ...

  1. #1

    Default Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    Hello all,

    We are embarking on a project to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6, to Linux. I
    just wanted to get some opinions on which flavor of linux would be the best
    to port to. First, the background info and requirements.

    We don't need the latest and greatest technology, we just need a stable
    environment for our Point of Sale system. The benefits of going to linux
    would be to continue finding any needed drivers and integrating any
    additional hardware into our system. For example, most of our devices are
    serial devices, ie. upc scanner, cash drawer, handheld scanner etc. If for
    some reason they switched to usb, we would be out of luck. The same is true
    for our receipt printer. We also don't want to be locked into buying the
    latest version so we can get the driver we need, also if we add more stores,
    we would like to avoid incurring more licensing charges. I would like to be
    able to use a basic kernel without a whole lot of extra features.

    I would like to know which distro would be the easiest port ...

    the most stable ...

    the best driver support ...

    the best long term survival chances ...

    the fastest with the smallest footprint ...

    The services we use are PPP for our backend connection, although that is
    probably going to be replaced with a satellite VPN soon. We run apache for
    a local intranet server (store reports are delivered to the local machine
    and the management can view them on a windows kiosk in the stores). The
    rest of the stuff we do is basic serial interface, simple tcp/ip, and file
    io. Our application runs in between the users and the OS so the GUI is not
    important. Our interface is currently a character based GUI, but we are
    replacing it with an x-windows based java front end (management wants it to
    look prettier).

    Any thoughts or suggestions are greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    justin


    Justin Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 14:56:06 -0700, "Justin Robbs"
    <com> wrote:
     

    Well my immediate thought is that you may be wise to research your
    intended platform a little more throughly. Any of the Linux distros
    will include all the features you require. The source is readily
    available, and free, as well as any patches and drivers; so you can
    recompile a custom kernel to your liking at any time. Thus, there's no
    version of Linux with "best driver support", since any version can be
    rebuilt or customised to your needs. A new driver appears, you simply
    compile it in. And no, you don't have to worry about paying ludicrous
    licencing fees, no matter what a certain dying UNIX vendor may say ;-)
    I think you'll find Linux' hardware support far better, and more
    stable than SCO UNIX, which has fallen so far behind it's hard to take
    it seriously.

    For vendor support, I'd suggest Redhat or SuSE (IBM use SuSE);
    although it depends upon your in-house expertise. Oracle use RH on
    their in-house systems, the German govt are going with SuSE.

    --
    FyRE < "War: The way Americans learn geography" >
    FyRE Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 22:28:48 +0000, FyRE <demon.ku.oc.x>
    wrote: 

    Not to mention that Novell's buying SuSE, which I would hope will only
    make it better as far as support is concerned.

    ================================================== =====================
    I'm Mike--James' Dad, hence "JamesDad". I use this nym in memory of my
    son James Webb (1992-2000) who died fighting leukemia. He was a greater
    man at 8 than some ever become. May his life, battle and story never be
    forgotten! More info at <http://www.themiraclekids.com/mem-james.htm>.
    JamesDad Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6


    your 
    distros 
    readily 
    can 
    there's no 
    can be 

    By driver support, which distro are companies providing drivers
    for. For example, we recently had to change to a new version of
    IBM's touch screens. The drivers for the new version had drivers
    for windows, mac, and redhat I believe (we ended up using a
    different vendor for our touch screens). Are the drivers
    "generally" portable across different flavors? Obviously, no one
    can answer for sure, but I am just looking for general
    experiences.
     
    ludicrous 
    say ;-)

    So if I buy redhat or SuSe, what am I paying for? Is it worth
    paying for a big name version or can I just get a freeware
    version and live with that? What are the pros and cons of each?
     
    more 
    to take 
    on 

    I have one other question. There is talk that we could sell our
    POS system to other companies, are there any issues with the GPL
    here? Our whole system is written in house, obviously we
    couldn't sell the operating system or any GPL'd drivers, but what
    about software that uses those drivers or runs on a GPL'd OS?
    Sorry for my ignorance, I have just never delved into these
    issues before.

    Justin


    Justin Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    In article <bp0un2$k44$tdl.com>,
    Justin Robbs <com> wrote: 
     
     

    A great many things are switching to USB and/or FireWire. Plan
    ahead for the changes.

    ..... 

    Every one of those is subject to change on a weekly basis.

    And I accidentally clipped the line about costs.

    In an article today on the new RH licensing, Lawrence Livermore
    Labs estimates their 4000-node cluster will cost them $800,000
    PER YEAR using the currnet RH figures. And as a taxpayer a little
    of that comes out of my pocket.

    The idea that retail packages go away, you pay a yearly license,
    and grant RedHat the right to audit your systems AFTER the license
    period expires to check to see if you are running it is causing
    consternation for some.

    Then there is the penalty if you are using more copies than you
    licensed. For a few over I recall it's the cost plus 5%. As
    the quantity increases the penalites rise dramatically.

    This seem to go back to the old IBM mainframe model in that
    you don't own the software, you just rent it for periods of time.
    That certainly is one way around the GPL.

    Bill
    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    Justin Robbs wrote:
     
    > your 
    > distros 
    > readily 
    > can 
    > there's no 
    > can be 
    >
    > By driver support, which distro are companies providing drivers
    > for. For example, we recently had to change to a new version of
    > IBM's touch screens. The drivers for the new version had drivers
    > for windows, mac, and redhat I believe (we ended up using a
    > different vendor for our touch screens). Are the drivers
    > "generally" portable across different flavors? Obviously, no one
    > can answer for sure, but I am just looking for general
    > experiences.[/ref]

    Generally so - it's the kernel flavours that you'll find most worrying.
    Each commercial vendor likes to tweak their kernel ever so slightly for
    competitive advantage - but they include the source for those tweaks with
    their kernels in the usual places.

    And the most change is between major kernel point releases. This is why
    Linus and co would prefer that companies bite the bullet and release the
    source code for device drivers. That way they could get their device
    drivers uptodate a lot quicker.

    I've had some experience - not a very pleasant experience - with a
    closed-source driver for a winmodem and a short, sharp hack to bring it
    from 2.2 to 2.4 status. The only time Linux wouldn't boot. [/ref]

    Best to set your kernel compile options to "module" for any device drivers
    you are likely to be updating on the fly like this. Otherwise you'll have
    to take your system down to do a kernel recompile.

    And no, you don't have to worry about paying 
    > say ;-)
    >
    > So if I buy redhat or SuSe, what am I paying for? Is it worth
    > paying for a big name version or can I just get a freeware
    > version and live with that? What are the pros and cons of each?[/ref]

    I can't really talk about "buying" RedHat or Su.S.E., because I've generally
    bought downloaded cdroms from friends. But I assume by "buying" RedHat you
    mean getting a support contract? That's a matter for discussion with the
    relevant vendor.

    For "freeware" versions, the most popular one is Debian. That has a very
    wide informal support structure, on the same lines as this newsgroup you're
    happily using right now. I can't say much about Slackware, because the
    last Slackware I used was 2.8, and that was from 1995. I havent' used
    Slackware since. 
    > more 
    > to take 
    > on 
    >
    > I have one other question. There is talk that we could sell our
    > POS system to other companies, are there any issues with the GPL
    > here? Our whole system is written in house, obviously we
    > couldn't sell the operating system or any GPL'd drivers, but what
    > about software that uses those drivers or runs on a GPL'd OS?
    > Sorry for my ignorance, I have just never delved into these
    > issues before.[/ref]

    For a start, the general GNU C libraries - included by default with Linux -
    are covered by the Lesser General Public License (LGPL), which allows you
    to link them to proprietary software. Thus you don't have to disclose any
    source when you sell your proprietary software thus linked. And
    application and utility software that runs on a GPLed OS, like Linux, isn't
    considered to become an indivisable part of the OS, so its status hasn't
    changed in any respect - it is still your code. The GPL only applies to
    code that is considered to form a single work with the original code, and
    if your code is an application, meaning that you separate its functioning
    from the underlying OS, the GPL smiles and waves in a friendly manner and
    has nothing more to say.

    If on the other hand, you decided to include vast chunks of the GPLed Linux
    source code in your POS, that would be a totally different scenario, and
    you'd have to talk to the relevant source code developers, lawyers, etc.
    And _that_'s messy! 

    I - these are just observations I've picked up along the way.

    Wesley Parish
    --
    First the wife, tone of awe. So much a condition. Kent in the labs, fast
    forward. "So how was the worthlessful businessman?" But they hadn't
    stopped meat for year ago, that arose hotel facade slowly moved apper.
    - Don't let emacs meta-x dissociatedpress write your speeches!
    Wesley Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6


    "Wesley Parish" <net.nz> wrote in message
    news:lg2tb.7061$tsnz.net... [/ref][/ref]
    research 
    > > distros 
    > > readily [/ref][/ref]
    you 
    > > there's no [/ref][/ref]
    version 
    > >
    > > By driver support, which distro are companies providing[/ref][/ref]
    drivers [/ref]
    of [/ref]
    drivers [/ref]
    one 
    >
    > Generally so - it's the kernel flavours that you'll find most[/ref]
    worrying. 
    slightly for 
    tweaks with 
    This is why 
    release the 
    device 

    That's what I was hoping to here. I would like to avoid being
    tied to a specific release or version as much as possible. We
    have run into problems with that twice, once was with a PCI
    driver for a 8-port digi board. We couldn't get it to work with
    5.0.5 and had to buy a number of 5.0.6 licenses. We had just
    bought the 5.0.5 licenses less than 6 months prior. We tried to
    get them to let us upgrade for some kind of discount, but no.
    Then we had trouble because the last when we bought our last set
    of merge license they required 5.0.5. Fortunately, they allowed
    is to buy a slightly older version.

    <snip>
     
    device drivers 
    you'll have [/ref][/ref]
    may [/ref]
    worth [/ref]
    each? 
    I've generally 
    "buying" RedHat you 
    discussion with the 
    has a very 
    newsgroup you're 
    because the 
    havent' used 

    That is exactly the kind of thing I am looking for. I never had
    much luck with SCO support, I have always had better luck with
    newsgroups. I just worry about the stability of the freeware
    versions. I really don't like RedHat's new licensing policy. It
    is not a simple task upgrading 900 machines when your only
    connection is PPP (at least for now) and the PC's don't have
    cd-roms (I don't know why they bought them that way, but that was
    before my time). For the most part, we don't need the latest and
    greatest version. We just want to have a cheaper alternative
    when we need to upgrade.
     
    > > more [/ref][/ref]
    hard [/ref][/ref]
    SuSE); [/ref][/ref]
    RH 
    > >
    > > I have one other question. There is talk that we could sell[/ref][/ref]
    our [/ref]
    GPL [/ref]
    what 
    >
    > For a start, the general GNU C libraries - included by default[/ref]
    with Linux - 
    allows you 
    disclose any 
    And 
    Linux, isn't 
    status hasn't 
    applies to 
    code, and 
    functioning 
    manner and 
    GPLed Linux 
    scenario, and 
    lawyers, etc. 
    >
    > I - these are just observations I've picked up along the[/ref]
    way. 

    That is the impression I got when reading the FAQ's at the FSF
    website, but I just have a hard time getting through all the
    legal mumbo jumbo.

    I also welcome any other thoughts or opinions on this topic. I
    would like to get as wide a view as possible to corroborate with
    my own ongoing research. Any help or suggestions are greatly
    appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Justin


    Justin Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6


    "Bill Vermillion" <comREMOVE> wrote in message
    news:com... 
    > [/ref]
    of 
    > [/ref]
    benefits [/ref]
    system. 
    >
    > A great many things are switching to USB and/or FireWire. Plan
    > ahead for the changes.
    >[/ref]

    That is the one of our big motivations for going down this path.
    We are doing some major code rewrites presently and figured since
    we are already overhauling things, this would be a good time to
    tackle this.
     [/ref]
    .... 
    >
    > Every one of those is subject to change on a weekly basis.
    >[/ref]

    Yeah, I figure that the answers to those questions are fairly
    dynamic, I mostly am curious about what people have experienced
    to be the best in these categories and the market niche the
    companies are currently pursuing. I am doing my own research as
    well, but it is nice to get the opinion of people who have been
    down this path.
     
    little 
    license, 
    license 
    time. 

    I am not a big fan of RedHat's current scheme. It doesn't fit
    what we want to do very well. At times, I think that we would be
    better off going with our own custom kernel, since our needs are
    fairly simple.

    Thanks,
    Justin


    Justin Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    In article <bp2sed$47g$tdl.com>,
    Justin Robbs <com> wrote: 

    [Lucretia Deletia wields her axe and hacks away most of the message ...]

     [/ref]
    >... 
    >>
    >> Every one of those is subject to change on a weekly basis.[/ref][/ref]
     

    One the above. The best driver support won't mean anything
    if they don't have the one driver you need.

    Best long term survival is nothing but a crap-shoot in today's
    world. What looks like a company that can't fail will often do
    just that, while the little one that no one expected much from can
    still be around 20 years later.

    Fastest with smallest footprint is something you will have to
    determine with your application - because an OS may be fastest
    running YYYY but not X, while another may be faster on X

    Match the OS with the aps you need - and go for best fit.
    Getting a consensus on fastest, most drivers, etc., may not be
    applicable for what you are doing.

    Bill
    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6


    <more stuff deletes>
     

    That's true. I've been down that road.
     
    can 

    I just don't want to be the guy that recommended Beta-max because
    it was a better technology.
     

    I realize that, I am just looking for any information I can get
    to make this decision easier, without bringing in a
    representative sample of the most popular flavors and putting it
    through rigorous testing. It would be interesting to know what
    flavor people prefer for what X application or YYYY
    application. That would help me immensely. From that I could
    evaluate the relatives strengths and weaknesses of the options
    out there. Too much of what you see on the net is marketing
    garbage that says it will do everything you want and will ever
    want to do. "It slices, it dices, it will cure the common cold
    and it still fits on a 5.25 disk and runs on an abicus. It has a
    20" display and will fit in your pocket." A lot of the
    non-marketing stuff is zealotry. I don't mean to offend anyone
    by saying that all Linux people are zealots, there are however, a
    number of people out there that are. Of course, I guess that's
    true for anything. I try to follow the trade mags, but real
    world experiences tell you so much more.

    Ideally, I could find some kind soul to tell me this will be
    perfect for you and you will never have issues with drivers or
    versions or stability. That is "some kind soul" with some
    knowledge not just your "average" marketing guy.

    Thanks for the help.

    Justin


    Justin Guest

  11. #11

    Default RE: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

     
    >
    > [Lucretia Deletia wields her axe and hacks away most of the
    > message ...]
    >

    > >... [/ref]

    >
    > One the above. The best driver support won't mean anything
    > if they don't have the one driver you need.[/ref]

    If you want stable and small footprint, I suggest FreeBSD. I've found it
    very easy to install/use and it has good driver support. Another bonus is
    that it actually is free!

    Just a suggestion,
    Fabio


    Fabio Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

     
    I've found it 
    Another bonus is 

    I hadn't thought a whole lot about BSD. I don't know much about
    it other than it is pretty similar to Unix, it was developed at
    Berkeley, and it is considered to be the most secure OS out of
    the box (ie. without patches and security tweaks). Does anyone
    have any suggestions about BSD vs. Linux?

    Thanks,
    Justin


    Justin Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    In article <bp3203$5kc$tdl.com>,
    Justin Robbs <com> wrote: 
     [/ref]
     
     [/ref]
     

    If you need the quality that was the way to go. As with anything
    use the best tool for the job. My ED-Beta outperforms anyting
    except BetaCam-SP or the digital version - in use everywhere in
    broadcast. You can't believe og tape can look that good.
    The converging lines on the test patterns fade out between
    the 500 line and 550 line grid so it comes out about 525 lines -
    with 10Mhz bandwidth.

    Resoution matches DVD - but since it's og it has the inherent
    og noise problem. Almost every I worked around was using
    BetaCam - since I'm an ex-broadcaster.

    You'd be far worse off if you recommend VHS and the quality didn't
    match expectations.
     [/ref]
     [/ref]
     

    What you haven't done is mentioned what your application is so that
    perhaps someone on the list may have run that and found which
    platform for you ap may be.
     

    Sounds like the new Apple i-Book with the 42" plasma screen
    and powered cart - all in brushed titanium.
     

    I've seen it all - from those who resisted moving from CPM 2.2
    to CPM 3. :-) Too often the zealots are pushing something to get
    rid of excess stock :-)
     

    You might start with what application you need and what kind of
    drivers you need.

    As it now stands you are only a step beyond "I need a new computer
    what should I get" - or "How do I get to NYC - and neglect to
    tell us where you are".

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    In article <001101c3aad2$625fb780$com>,
    Fabio Giannotti <com> wrote: 
    >>
    >> [Lucretia Deletia wields her axe and hacks away most of the
    >> message ...]
    >>
    >> 
    >> [/ref][/ref]
     [/ref]
     

    And can be made really really small. You can use the picobsd
    to build you own custom system to make a firewall, a router,
    bridge, etc. Locally GTA builds and entire firewall that all you
    need is an iNTEL based machine with one floppy - as it runs off the
    floppy. That's a small footprint.

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

     
    inherent 

    My wife majored in broadcast journalism in college, small world.
     
    didn't 

    I was going for the ogy of a friend of mine's parents who
    bought a beta before they disappeared then had to scrap it when
    video stores quit carrying beta. But I get your point.

    <snip>
     

    The application is a point of sale application with a touch
    screen interface. The file i/o is not real excessive. The sales
    records that we write are relatively small. All writes are
    unbuffered to prevent loss of data in the event of a hardware or
    power problem (the stores have UPS's but those are outdated at
    best). Most devices are serial devices connected via an 8 port
    PCI digi classic board. The printer is parallel. The network
    connection is a tcp/ip sockets connection built in to the
    program.

    I have checked on the touch screen drivers and the sound drivers.
    They are all linux compatible, according to the vendor.

    In each store there are three machines, 2 registers and 1 machine
    that interfaces to the gas pumps (the gasserver). The program
    that interfaces to the gas pumps communicates to them via a
    standard serial connection.

    We have 2 data files that we interface to regularily. One is the
    price master file, which as the name would indicate contains all
    pricing information. The other is our employee login file. The
    files are streams files.

    The screens are character based screen overlays. I can't give a
    whole lot of information about that because our screen generation
    program is a proprietary program written in basic long before I
    got here. I know how to use it and that is about it. We are in
    the process of removing the front end and replacing it with a
    java front end (management wants it to look prettier).

    We connect to the main office via a ppp connection, although we
    are beginning to experiment with a satellite connection.

    If that is not enough information, I can provide more.

    Thanks for the help.

    Justin


    Justin Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    In article <bp3495$683$tdl.com>,
    Justin Robbs <com> wrote: 
    >I've found it 
    >Another bonus is [/ref]
     

    I do - and so do many others.

    I just really like the clean design and predictability of FreeBSD.
    The team does an excellent job of keeping everything where it
    belongs, and you can totally upgrade the OS and not touch anything
    else with no problem.

    That's because only the OS is on /, and everything else is on it's
    own partitions. During a system reinstall the /etc is saved and
    you can put back the old one, rewrite your config files, or merge
    them.

    On a fast system I can build then entired OS from sources in 25
    minutes. A kernel build - using the newly built modules but not
    yet instaled on the system - takes about 1 min. Install the kernel
    in about 30 seconds.

    Reboot and see if the kernel is OK, go to single user and install
    the entire OS - about 3 minutes on a fast machine and 15 on
    something like a 200MHz P5.

    Then you run the merge program to coalesce your config files in
    /etc - which is the most tedious part - usually about 15 minutes if
    you do that, reboot and you are done.

    I've rebuilt the servers remotely with no problems. Doentation
    is about the best there is. Some of it is so good that Linux uses
    many of the pages as is with just a search/replace on the OS.

    I've found some things in Linux don't seem to be 'fail safe'

    xinetd bit me recently when I got a call that a system was rebooted
    because power failure outlasted the UPS and nothing would come up.
    No mail, they have many who telneted in for mail too and telent
    was gone. I was able to get with ssh as I had installed that.

    Upon examing things I found that everything that xinetd was to
    start was not started. I fired it up manually, everyting started
    and then immediately died.

    A little man page persuing and I found the flags to log inetd,
    and ran it, and watched everything startup and then stop.

    I looked at the log and saw 18 or 19 things start up, and then when
    the ftp daemon tried to start it failed, and xinted bailed out and
    took down everything it had started. To my way of thinking only
    the problem service should have failed to start.

    I traced it to a corrupted startup script with a wrong parameter
    in the xinetd tree.

    Granted, that's only one thing - but something that should never
    happen IMO. But then again I came out of the broadcast industry
    where if something was 10 seconds late it could mean thousands of
    dollars lost as that time can not be recovered. That's why on big
    things like live football there are dual systems running for
    commercials and if one fails the changeover is instant.

    So I guess it's where you are coming from as to whether you
    tolerate things like that.

    At an ISP years ago I moved everthing off of very expensive SGI
    machines - eg in the $15k range each with RISC processors and the
    genunine Netscape servers, into FreeBSD [2.6 at that time I think],
    with apache, and found the performance easily doubled. Part was
    the slimmer OS and of course Apache was cleaner than the Netscape.

    But 3 $2000 machines were far cheaper than the one $15K machine and
    the two $10K. The same could be said for Linux - but that was in
    1995 and I've never seen a reason to change.

    However I have no clue as to how they would work in a POS.
    That's one area where SCO seems to shine and many are using it.
    But for servers directly on backbones I really like them.

    So that's a data point of 1.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    FyRE wrote: 
    >
    > Well my immediate thought is that you may be wise to research your
    > intended platform a little more throughly. Any of the Linux distros
    > will include all the features you require. The source is readily
    > available, and free, as well as any patches and drivers; so you can
    > recompile a custom kernel to your liking at any time. Thus, there's no
    > version of Linux with "best driver support", since any version can be
    > rebuilt or customised to your needs. A new driver appears, you simply
    > compile it in. And no, you don't have to worry about paying ludicrous
    > licencing fees, no matter what a certain dying UNIX vendor may say ;-)
    > I think you'll find Linux' hardware support far better, and more
    > stable than SCO UNIX, which has fallen so far behind it's hard to take
    > it seriously.
    >[/ref]

    You can check with a lot of the resellers here, OpenServer may be behind
    on features like threads and drivers for new devices, but it certainly
    is stable. Unixware is more up to date, ahead of Linux is some aspects,
    and is very stable. So much so that telecoms choose it as the O/S to
    run huge PBX switches. I think even Boeing uses Unixware onboard their
    jets as controller software. Many companies use one of these products
    for things like point of sale because of the proven stability, proven
    over years of real use.

     

    Mike

    --
    Michael Brown

    The Kingsway Group
    Mike Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    Justin Robbs wrote:
     [/ref]
     
    > device drivers 
    > you'll have [/ref]
    > may [/ref]
    > worth [/ref]
    > each? 
    > I've generally 
    > "buying" RedHat you 
    > discussion with the 
    > has a very 
    > newsgroup you're 
    > because the 
    > havent' used 
    >
    > That is exactly the kind of thing I am looking for. I never had
    > much luck with SCO support, I have always had better luck with
    > newsgroups. I just worry about the stability of the freeware
    > versions. I really don't like RedHat's new licensing policy. It
    > is not a simple task upgrading 900 machines when your only
    > connection is PPP (at least for now) and the PC's don't have
    > cd-roms (I don't know why they bought them that way, but that was
    > before my time). For the most part, we don't need the latest and
    > greatest version. We just want to have a cheaper alternative
    > when we need to upgrade.[/ref]

    Debian has a policy of separating its releases into stable, unstable, and
    bleeding-edge. Stable is generally quite old, but it is stable. Unstable
    is generally a lot more stable than the name suggests; the bleeding edge
    one is unstable, and is development.

    As far as cdroms go, you could equip one machine with a cdrom and instal via
    ftp - though I've never done it yet, I've seen it done. It's fast, quick
    and easy. [/ref]
    > hard [/ref]
    > SuSE); [/ref]
    > RH [/ref][/ref]
    <snip> 
    > way. 
    >
    > That is the impression I got when reading the FAQ's at the FSF
    > website, but I just have a hard time getting through all the
    > legal mumbo jumbo.
    >
    > I also welcome any other thoughts or opinions on this topic. I
    > would like to get as wide a view as possible to corroborate with
    > my own ongoing research. Any help or suggestions are greatly
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Justin[/ref]

    --
    First the wife, tone of awe. So much a condition. Kent in the labs, fast
    forward. "So how was the worthlessful businessman?" But they hadn't
    stopped meat for year ago, that arose hotel facade slowly moved apper.
    - Don't let emacs meta-x dissociatedpress write your speeches!
    Wesley Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6

    In article <bp3dga$8nc$tdl.com>,
    Justin Robbs <com> wrote: 
    >inherent [/ref]
     
     [/ref]
     

    And since I have rented only 1 or 2 videos in my life - but record
    films of cable [and prior late night b'dcast] and my Beta had
    8 edit points that could do assemble editing with +- 3 frame
    accuracy though I typicall got 0-1 frame, I'd set it to record on
    of the late night films, and spend 10-15 minutes marking the edit
    points, and then let it "do it's thing" and come back latter to
    watch it.

    But if you were a renter then Beta was the wrong choice. But I got
    my first VCR before there were ANY pre-recorded films for sale.
    Magnetic Video leased 20 titles from 20thC.Fox as an experiment.
    The rest is history. I still have "The Day THe Earth Stood Still"
    on one of those, along with the newly restored DVD.

    It's like an application and an OS system. Choose the one that
    best suits your needs - and don't worry what the majority use.

    And last week going through a lot of aculated 'junk' I ran
    across a dozen reels of 1/2" EIAJ video tapes and an old GE
    reel-reel VTR I picked up [probalby free] along the line.
    If it use electrons to paint a screen I'm hooked - no matter what's
    behind it - video or computers.

    Bill
    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Best Linux version to port from OpenServer 5.0.5/6


    "Wesley Parish" <net.nz> wrote in message
    news:9kotb.7252$tsnz.net... [/ref]

    > > device drivers [/ref][/ref]
    Otherwise [/ref][/ref]
    vendor 
    > > worth 
    > > each? [/ref][/ref]
    because 
    > > "buying" RedHat you 
    > > discussion with the [/ref][/ref]
    That 
    > > newsgroup you're 
    > > because the 
    > > havent' used 
    > >
    > > That is exactly the kind of thing I am looking for. I never[/ref][/ref]
    had [/ref]
    with [/ref]
    It [/ref]
    was [/ref]
    and 
    >
    > Debian has a policy of separating its releases into stable,[/ref]
    unstable, and 
    stable. Unstable 
    bleeding edge 
    and instal via 
    fast, quick 

    The problem with that is our machines are clustered in groups of
    3 per store. So we would still have to install 300 cd-roms and
    have technicians drive to each store with a cd every time we
    upgrade. With stores spread across 1000 miles from one end to
    another. That is a lot of driving.

    I appreciate the information on Debian. I keep coming across
    that in my research, that and FreeBSD.

    Thanks,
    Justin


    Justin Guest

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