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bracketing question - Photography

I just inherited a Nikon FA (lucky me, it's in pristine shape--maybe 10 rolls of film through it). I have a question about the bracketing feature. In the various exposure modes (P, A, S, and M) what is being manipulated to achieve bracketing? For example, in aperture priority mode, is the shutter speed being slowed down or sped up? Likewise, in shutter priority mode, is the aperture being changed (causing depth of field considerations)? Or is the camera messing around with the ASA setting, thus leaving shutter speeds and f-stops essentially where they are at the "0" bracketing position? Just ...

  1. #1

    Default bracketing question

    I just inherited a Nikon FA (lucky me, it's in pristine shape--maybe 10 rolls
    of film through it). I have a question about the bracketing feature.

    In the various exposure modes (P, A, S, and M) what is being manipulated to
    achieve bracketing?

    For example, in aperture priority mode, is the shutter speed being slowed down
    or sped up? Likewise, in shutter priority mode, is the aperture being changed
    (causing depth of field considerations)?

    Or is the camera messing around with the ASA setting, thus leaving shutter
    speeds and f-stops essentially where they are at the "0" bracketing position?

    Just wondering what is happening.

    Tom
    TWK53 Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: bracketing question

    On 10 Jul 2003 19:51:57 GMT, [email]twk53aol.com[/email] (TWK53) wrote:
    >I just inherited a Nikon FA (lucky me, it's in pristine shape--maybe 10 rolls
    >of film through it). I have a question about the bracketing feature.
    >In the various exposure modes (P, A, S, and M) what is being manipulated to
    >achieve bracketing?
    >For example, in aperture priority mode, is the shutter speed being slowed down
    >or sped up? Likewise, in shutter priority mode, is the aperture being changed
    >(causing depth of field considerations)?
    >Or is the camera messing around with the ASA setting, thus leaving shutter
    >speeds and f-stops essentially where they are at the "0" bracketing position?
    >Just wondering what is happening.
    >Tom
    I'm not a Nikon user, so I don't know the specifics of their cameras,
    but most cameras that have the same feature do indeed do like you
    hypothesized about changing shutter speed and/or aperture depending
    upon what type of automatic exposure is being made. It wouldn't do
    much good for the camera to change the ASA setting (other than that
    itself would cause a shift in either shutter speed and/or aperture).

    In most practical applications, you will probably never use that
    feature. It's mostly for corrections using filters and oddball film
    speeds. Most modern cameras can make the compensations for filter
    correction with their own light meter...but some models that use
    unusual metering patterns do not compensate for certain filter types
    (such as polarizers).
    Slingblade Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: bracketing question



    TWK53 wrote:
    > I just inherited a Nikon FA (lucky me, it's in pristine shape--maybe 10 rolls
    > of film through it). I have a question about the bracketing feature.
    >
    > In the various exposure modes (P, A, S, and M) what is being manipulated to
    > achieve bracketing?
    >
    > For example, in aperture priority mode, is the shutter speed being slowed down
    > or sped up? Likewise, in shutter priority mode, is the aperture being changed
    > (causing depth of field considerations)?
    >
    > Or is the camera messing around with the ASA setting, thus leaving shutter
    > speeds and f-stops essentially where they are at the "0" bracketing position?
    >
    > Just wondering what is happening.
    >
    > Tom
    In P, A and S modes, if you change the aperture or the speed; then the
    camera will change the speed or the aperture reciprocally. Hence you
    control depth of field and/or motion-blur, but you are NOT bracketing
    the exposure.

    Bracketing means taking extra shots when unsure of the
    lighting/metering. In difficult lighting you might get a meter reading
    that seems just right, but you're worried the meter may have been fooled
    by the current condition. So you offset the exposure with the exposure
    compensation adjustment. If you don't have an exposure compensation
    wheel, then another way is to change the ISO setting. This is prone to
    error as it is easy to forget that you changed it and it requires
    thinking to remember that a lower ISO leads to a greater exposure.
    There is nothing wrong with thinking, but you are adding to the list of
    variable...

    An example of exposure compensation is shooting a scene that is largely
    white (snow scene). Pure white is about two stops more reflective than
    18% grey (where the meter is "centered"). So you decide to compensate.
    You set the exp comp at +2 and shoot that. (Or set ISO 25 with ISO
    100 film). Why +2 and not -2? Since white reflects more light to the
    meter, the meter thinks that that 18% grey is really bright and tells
    the shutter to speed up (or the aperture to crunch down). This will
    lead of course to under exposure, so we + it up to get what we want...

    A bracketing example could be where you meter off of a yellow flower.
    You don't know how much brighter than 18% grey that flower is. It's not
    as reflective as white. So you decide to shoot it as metered (1 shot)
    at +2/3 and at +1.5. That's bracketing.

    Read your manual to know how the bracketing works in your camera. For
    example if you are in "A" mode, then bracketing through exposure
    compensation should affect shutter speed. If you are in "S" mode, then
    the aperture should be affected. Read carefully to know how it works
    when at the limits of the aperture (or speed).

    In Manual, bracketing is easilly accomplisehd by simply watching the
    meter and letting it go either side of bang-on with the speed or
    aperture setting.

    Hope that helps.

    Alan.

    Alan Browne Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: bracketing question



    TWK53 wrote:
    > I just inherited a Nikon FA (lucky me, it's in pristine shape--maybe 10 rolls
    > of film through it). I have a question about the bracketing feature.
    >
    > In the various exposure modes (P, A, S, and M) what is being manipulated to
    > achieve bracketing?
    >
    > For example, in aperture priority mode, is the shutter speed being slowed down
    > or sped up? Likewise, in shutter priority mode, is the aperture being changed
    > (causing depth of field considerations)?
    >
    > Or is the camera messing around with the ASA setting, thus leaving shutter
    > speeds and f-stops essentially where they are at the "0" bracketing position?
    >
    > Just wondering what is happening.
    >
    > Tom
    In P, A and S modes, if you change the aperture or the speed; then the
    camera will change the speed or the aperture reciprocally. Hence you
    control depth of field and/or motion-blur, but you are NOT bracketing
    the exposure.

    Bracketing means taking extra shots when unsure of the
    lighting/metering. In difficult lighting you might get a meter reading
    that seems just right, but you're worried the meter may have been fooled
    by the current condition. So you offset the exposure with the exposure
    compensation adjustment. If you don't have an exposure compensation
    wheel, then another way is to change the ISO setting. This is prone to
    error as it is easy to forget that you changed it and it requires
    thinking to remember that a lower ISO leads to a greater exposure. There
    is nothing wrong with thinking, but you are adding to the list of
    variable...

    An example of exposure compensation is shooting a scene that is largely
    white (snow scene). Pure white is about two stops more reflective than
    18% grey (where the meter is "centered"). So you decide to compensate.
    You set the exp comp at +2 and shoot that. (Or set ISO 25 with ISO
    100 film). Why +2 and not -2? Since white reflects more light to the
    meter, the meter thinks that that 18% grey is really bright and tells
    the shutter to speed up (or the aperture to crunch down). This will
    lead of course to under exposure, so we + it up to get what we want...

    A bracketing example could be where you meter off of a yellow flower.
    You don't know how much brighter than 18% grey that flower is. It's not
    as reflective as white. So you decide to shoot it as metered (1 shot)
    at +2/3 and at +1.5 (two more shots). That's bracketing. You can
    bracket with one more shot, you can bracket over and under the meter,
    you can bracket with 7 shots, you can bracket at 1/2 stop intervals,
    2/3, 1 ... whatever).

    Read your manual to know how the exposure compensation works in your
    camera. For example if you are in "A" mode, then bracketing through
    exposure compensation should affect shutter speed. If you are in "S"
    mode, then the aperture should be affected. Read carefully to know how
    it works when at the limits of the aperture (or speed).

    In Manual, bracketing is easilly accomplisehd by simply watching the
    meter and letting it go either side of bang-on with the speed or
    aperture setting.

    Hope that helps.

    Alan.

    Alan Browne Guest

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