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Can Finder tell you where something is? - Mac Applications & Software

This seems like a silly problem, and I'm probably missing something really obvious, but ... The problem is, when Finder finds something, how can I discover where it is, so I can tell another app about it? Example in hand: I just downloaded and installed the OSX version of the RealPlayer (which they seem to have renamed to "RealOne Player", so that it won't match a search for "RealPlayer", but that's another gripe ;-). When I click on a .rm link in, say, mozilla, of course it doesn't know that I want to use any particular program so it pops ...

  1. #1

    Default Can Finder tell you where something is?

    This seems like a silly problem, and I'm probably missing something really
    obvious, but ...

    The problem is, when Finder finds something, how can I discover where it is,
    so I can tell another app about it?

    Example in hand: I just downloaded and installed the OSX version of the
    RealPlayer (which they seem to have renamed to "RealOne Player", so that
    it won't match a search for "RealPlayer", but that's another gripe ;-).

    When I click on a .rm link in, say, mozilla, of course it doesn't know that
    I want to use any particular program so it pops up its little window for me
    to select something. When I say I want to pick an app, it pops up a window,
    and it's positioned in my home directory. But there's no sign of anything
    with "Real" in its name. So where the #$# did the little beast install
    itself. Looking in the obvious places turns up no matches.

    So I fire up the Finder, and tell it to look for "Real". It returns a long
    list, and in the middle of it is "RealOne Player". Aha! I just need to tell
    the silly browser to use that one.

    But how? Finder shows no clue as to where on the disk it fond the program.
    I dug through Finder's menus, wandered around the Help app, tried a few
    Preferences windows, all to no avail. I totally failed to trick it into
    telling me where the "RealOne Player" was living.

    One guess was that I could just drag the app's icon over to mozilla's window.
    The ghostly image dragged just fine, and when I let go the button, it just
    disappeared. I tried dropping it several places into mozilla's window, to
    no avail.

    I was reduced to telling mozilla to go into every directory, one by one,
    until I stumbled across it. Then I could select it, and it works fine. But
    this took over an hour. There are LOT of directories on the disk, and I'd
    have never have guessed the name of the one where I foundit.

    Is there a faster way than exhaustive search? It seems like the Finder
    should be able to tell me where it found something. But I can't find
    anything anywhere that tells it to do it. It will go down into directories,
    true, but there's no apparent way to make it back up. It seems to be just
    sitting there smirking, saying "Ha, ha; I know where it is and you don't!"

    There's gotta be something simple that I'm missing ...


    John Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    In article <bi6kih$9cc$news.rcn.net>,
    John Chambers <com> wrote:
     
    [snip] 

    Click on something in the Search Results window, and the bottom section
    of the window will show exactly where it is. You can make the bottom
    section bigger or smaller by dragging the divider bar. If you can't see
    the bottom section, try clicking the window's green "+" resize button.

    You can open a program, file, or folder from the Search Results window
    by double-clicking it. That includes the list of nested folders in the
    bottom section of the window.

    You can also drag files or folders from the Search Results window
    directly into the "Open" dialog of another program. The Open dialog
    will jump to the right folder and select that file. (This won't work
    for "Classic" programs.)
    Wayne Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    Wayne C. Morris <is.invalid> wrote:
     
    > really > obvious, but ... > > The problem is, when Finder finds something,
    > how can I discover where it is, > so I can tell another app about it?
    > [snip] > So I fire up the Finder, and tell it to look for "Real". It
    > returns a long > list, and in the middle of it is "RealOne Player". Aha!
    > I just need to tell > the silly browser to use that one. > > But how?
    > Finder shows no clue as to where on the disk it fond the program.
    >
    > Click on something in the Search Results window, and the bottom section of
    > the window will show exactly where it is. You can make the bottom section
    > bigger or smaller by dragging the divider bar. If you can't see the
    > bottom section, try clicking the window's green "+" resize button.
    >
    > You can open a program, file, or folder from the Search Results window by
    > double-clicking it. That includes the list of nested folders in the
    > bottom section of the window.
    >
    > You can also drag files or folders from the Search Results window directly
    > into the "Open" dialog of another program. The Open dialog will jump to
    > the right folder and select that file. (This won't work for "Classic"
    > programs.)[/ref]

    And while you're at it, you can drag a file on to the application's icon
    in the dock (assuming it's already there, of course).
    --
    Beware the SPAMblock - if your mailer doesn't see my Reply-To:, use
    john at yclept dot freeserve dot co dot uk
    John Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    Phil Stripling wrote:
     
    >
    > Click on the item in the list of found files. In the pane below that list,
    > you'll see the path, tortuous though it may be.[/ref]

    Hmmm ... I tried it with several searches, and all it ever says is "Macintosh
    HD". Clicking on that changes its background from white to yellow, presumably
    some sort of selection, but doesn't show any more information. A double click
    opens up a window titled "Macintosh HD", but that shows the usual top-level
    contents, with no apparent clue where the things I'm looking for may be hiding.

    I'm obviously missing something ...

     

    I don't think I follow this. I do leave the search results window open, and
    I have several on the screen. What does "track it down" mean? How do you do
    that? (This seems a description of what I was trying to do all along.)

    I'm more and more thinking that what I need is a very, very low-level doc that
    describes in excruciating detail how to do fun things with the trackpad and the
    button. I've seen other people do things that I have no clues about, and it's
    hardly possible to follow someone's fingers while watching what happens on the
    screen. I've been keeping an eye out for such a doc, but everything seems to
    assume that I "just know all that". I obviously don't.


    John Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    Greg Robbins wrote:
     
    >
    > Click once on the item in the search results window; at the bottom of
    > the window, the Finder shows the path. The bottom portion of the search
    > results window is resizable, so be sure it's not completely closed.[/ref]

    I assume you mean that little area that just says "Macintosh HD". That's
    all it seems to say, which is sorta pointless, because I'd guessed that the
    things I was searching for were probably on the HD (and I didn't expect the
    powerbook's Finder to search the nearby linux box's HD ;-).

    What does it mean to say that that portion is resizabl? It's mostly white
    space anyway, so there's no reason to resize it. Bu I tried. The resize
    thingy down in the corner changes only the height of the list of matches;
    it has no effect on anything else in the window. I dug around in the "Help"
    stuff, giving it assorted keywords, and didn't turn up anything that has
    any other effect.
     
    >
    > You can usually drag an icon for an application (or the icon for the
    > application's parent folder) into the file selection dialog like the one
    > Mozilla opened. That's a lot easier than manually navigating the file
    > selection dialog to the right spot on your hard drive.[/ref]

    Yeah; I tried that. Maybe I don't know how to do drag-and-drop right. I
    press and hold the button over the thing I want to drag, and use the trackpad
    to move the pointer. Iget a ghost image of the thing following the pointer
    across the screen. I release the button where I want it dropped (the mozilla
    or safari or whatever selection window), and the ghost image disappears. The
    selection window shows no sign of anything falling on its head.

    So what am I doing wrong? Or better, how do I do it right, so that D&D workd?

    This does seem the obvious way to get something from the Finder's search results
    window to someone else's selection window. So I keep trying it. But I've never
    seen it work.

    I also dug around for docs on drag and drop, found several, but they seem to
    assume that I understand the finger mechanics of it. I obviously don't. I've
    seen it work on linux and windoze boxes (sometimes; it's flakey on both of them).
    And I've seen it work the way I expect on OSX within single apps like iPhoto and
    the mailer. But I've never seen it work between apps.

    What magic am I missing?


    John Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    On Sun, 24 Aug 2003, John Chambers wrote: 
    > > Click once on the item in the search results window; at the bottom
    > > of the window, the Finder shows the path. The bottom portion of the
    > > search results window is resizable, so be sure it's not completely
    > > closed.[/ref]
    >
    > I assume you mean that little area that just says "Macintosh HD".
    > That's all it seems to say, which is sorta pointless, because I'd
    > guessed that the things I was searching for were probably on the HD
    > (and I didn't expect the powerbook's Finder to search the nearby
    > linux box's HD ;-).
    >
    > What does it mean to say that that portion is resizabl? It's mostly
    > white space anyway, so there's no reason to resize it. Bu I tried.
    > The resize thingy down in the corner changes only the height of the
    > list of matches; it has no effect on anything else in the window. I
    > dug around in the "Help" stuff, giving it assorted keywords, and
    > didn't turn up anything that has any other effect.
    >[/ref]

    When I do a cmd-F in the finder, and type in a string for the file
    match, say "gene" for instance, a bunch of files show up.
    I select one "genetic ysis".
    In the lower window, I see one of three things,depending on how many
    lines I've made available:

    1). Just the name of the hard disk -- when there's only one line available.
    AlaskaU1

    2). A sequence of names & icons separated by "arrows" -- when there are
    fewer lines than the number of names listed.
    AlaskU1 > jwd >Doents > Biochem,genetics > genetic ysis

    3). A sequence of lines, each with one file/folder name & icon on it,
    indented to show nesting -- when there are enough lines available.

    Sounds like you're seeing case 1.

    So, how do you make more lines available? You're right -- resizing the
    window doesn't do it -- it just increases the number of lines in the
    upper window. Here's the secret:

    Look carefully at the boundary between the windows. I see two separate
    parts -- the horizontal scrollbar from the upper window and a "not quite
    blank" line above the lower window. In the middle of that line there is
    a small icon -- looks like 3 horizontal dashes, one above the other, on
    my machine. Move the mouse over that bar, slowly -- it will change
    from a "pointer" to a "hand". When you push the mouse button, the hand
    will close -- you've grabbed the bar. Now, move the bar up -- Tada! More
    lines. Give it 4 or 5, and you'll be able to find things much easier.

    joe
    Joe Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    John Hill wrote:
     

    Hey, that probably would have never occurred to me. I'll give it a try,
    and see if I can find places where it works. Thanks.

    (Wherever do you learn these tricks? Is this list the only place they're
    doented? ;-)


    John Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    In article <bibbsp$rge$news.rcn.net>, John Chambers
    <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > Hey, that worked!
    >
    > I've gotta congratulate the folks at Apple at coming up with one of the
    > least obvious designs that I've seen so far. They certainly are inventive,
    > I've gotta give them that.[/ref]

    The Find window has worked that way since around Mac OS 8, and window
    dividers are older than that.

    Other ways to do it include:

    1) Use Get Info, it'll show the selected file's location next to "Where"
    2) Choose "Open Enclosing Folder" from the File menu or the context menu
    to select the file in its original folder, then use the pop-up menu
    in that window's title bar to see where it is. This is handy when
    you are interested in other files in the same folder.

    --
    Jerry Kindall, Seattle, WA <http://www.jerrykindall.com/>

    When replying by e-mail, use plain text ONLY to make sure I read it.
    Due to spam and viruses, I filter all mail with HTML or attachments.
    Jerry Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    In article <biangd$h8e$news.rcn.net>, John Chambers <com> wrote:
     

    "Mac OS X: The Missing Manual (second edition)" by David Pogue.

    --
    Jim Glidewell
    My opinions only
    Jim Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    In article <biao7n$ip9$news.rcn.net>,
    John Chambers <com> wrote:

    [...]

    [drag&drop]
     

    It depends on the app program whether or not inter-app drag&drop will
    work.

    In general you should be able to select text, and drag it from one app
    to the other. (Provided all apps involved support this.)

    When the text is something special, you ought t see adapted behaviour.
    For instance, I can drag a URL from a MT-NewsWatcher (my newsclient)
    window into an iCab (my webbrowser) window and have iCab go there
    (without iCab coming to the front, which is exactly as I expect it to
    be). I can drop that same URL on the Finder to create an "Internet
    Location File", which I can in turn drop on a browser window to send the
    browser there, or on a text app's window to get the text displayed.

    But in some apps nothing can be dragged, or no drops are accepted, or
    only partial drags and or drops are supported. I think in some browsers
    you can drag images, but not text, for instance. Another example: drag
    an image from iCab into iTunes' "Artwork" area. No go. Drag the iumage
    to the Finder, yes go. Drag it from the Finder to ITunes, yes go.

    The only thing that will make things better is complain to developers.
    Some of them understand the beauty/need of good drag&drop support,
    others need to be kicked ;)

    --
    Free and shareware at <http://www.euronet.nl/~tekelenb/software/>
    Sander Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    In article <biebql$ftc$news.rcn.net>,
    John Chambers <com> wrote:

    [...]

    [hand cursor]
     

    True, however, don't worry about it too much. Now that you know that
    every seemingly decorative thing may have a function, you can finally
    start your discovery trip ;)

    Additional hint to take on your trip: often when holding the Option key
    while doing something, a slight variation of the action gets executed.
    For instance, when you have several windows open, closing them while
    holdiong the Option key down, you'll close all of them; doubleclicking
    a file or folder in a Finder window will open it, and close the
    previous window. Lots more to discover.

    In menus, at least in 'real Mac' apps, when you hold the Option key
    you'll actually see menu items change. (Eudora is a very good example
    of this. - Poeple who whine about it's 'old fashioned' interface have
    no idea what they're talking about.)

    (Btw, on many keyboards the "Option" key is named "Alt".)
     

    Think Apple ;) Many people like how Apple makes stuff that isn't just
    usefull, but also looks nice. But people often forget that it's as much
    the other way around: just because it looks pretty doesn't mean it is
    only decorative...
     

    I agree that the 3 lines aren't completely self-explanatory. My guess
    is they meant to mimic the kind of relief (as in depth, not "to
    relieve") you often see on hardware devices, to allow fingers to get a
    grip on some part - typically a battery door. Often those devices have
    a couple of 'lines' of about 1 or 2 millimeter thick, so you can place
    a finger on it, and push the thing.
     

    Look at it more closey and with a more open mind ;) All it is is a
    hand. What do you use hands for? For grabbing. So grab something with
    that hand cursor. (Btw, you'll see this cursor in many apps, whenever
    there are objects to be dragged around.)
     

    You're too law-abiding - Think Different ;)

    [...]
     

    That's only because in practice the contextual menu unfortunately is
    often oxymoronized into a 'pop-up' menu, or even a 'right-click-menu'.

    A contextual menu is a menu that only lists menu items that make sense
    in the given context. A great concept, somewhat killed by developers
    just dumping everything in the menu always. However, the name stuck, so
    some of us now and then remember to complain loudly about certain
    developers ;)

    Those who don't realize it should be contextual tend to call it a
    'pop-up menu', or the 'right-click', (or, in a typical
    single-button-Mac-mouse
    situation: "Ctrl-click").

    Point at the object you want to manipulate when you want the
    contexual menu. Close your eyes if you just want a pop-up menu.

    End of rant ;)
     

    I couldn't follow everything, but my impression is you're still having
    problems recognizing some essential parts of the Search Results window
    in the sense of finding where the found files actually live. Consider
    that window a regular Finder window (set to "list view"), just without a
    Toolbar and with a special part at the bottom which you can resize
    with the hand cursor. The path to the file that you select in the top
    half of the window, will be shown in the bottom half. Yet you claim to
    see the bottom half to be empty, just saying "Macintosh HD". This leads
    me to believe all that's 'wrong' is that you have more than 1 file
    selected in the top half of the Search Results window. (Possibly as a
    result from trying to drag things out of there.) When you select
    multiple files, the bottom half will show you the path as far as it
    applies to *alll* files in your selection. The more files, the more
    likely that the only common item in their path is the name of the disk
    they all live on.

    Btw, assuming that now you do see file paths in the Search Results
    window's bottom half: typically that part of the window allows more
    interesting manipulation than the top half in my experience. For
    instance, you can double-click any folder in that path and have it
    opened in its own window. You can drop files in the found app to have
    them opened in it. You can Option-double-click it to have it opened and
    at the same time have the search Results window closed. Etc.


    HTH

    --
    Free and shareware at <http://www.euronet.nl/~tekelenb/software/>
    Sander Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    John Chambers <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > Hey, that probably would have never occurred to me. I'll give it a try,
    > and see if I can find places where it works. Thanks.
    >
    > (Wherever do you learn these tricks? Is this list the only place they're
    > doented? ;-)[/ref]

    I just do what seems obvious, and on a Mac it usually works. [Think: I
    have Doent X's icon visible and I want to open it with App Y, but the
    file type of Doc X is not associated with App Y, so double clicking Doc
    X's icon won't launch App Y. What is the most convenient way then to
    open Doc X in App Y? It is certainly *not* searching through the
    Application folder for App Y, double clicking on it and then opening Doc
    X from within it. Actually, dragging Doc X onto App Y icon in the
    Finder (once you've found App Y) will work [1]. But even easier - just
    drag Doc X onto the icon of App Y in the Dock.]

    How did I work out to do this? I just thought "What is the quickest and
    neatest way to achieve this task? Hmm, wouldn't it be great if I could
    just drag the doc onto the app in the Dock?" And of course on the Mac
    it works.

    For a piece of nifty Mac-esque, try getting rid of an unwanted icon from
    the Dock. You just drag it off the Dock and let it go. Notice how it
    disappears in a puff of smoke - quite literally. And the smoke has been
    made to look like a Simpson's cartoon, which made me laugh.

    Cheers,
    Vaughan

    [1] This method will also work in Windows. So it seems pretty much an
    accepted method. Mac just takes it a step further with the Dock.
    Vaughan Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Can Finder tell you where something is?

    John Chambers <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > Maybe, and that's probably helpful for those who've been using Macs since
    > OS 8. For newbies, there's not much intuitively obvious about it. It's
    > obvious only after you know it.[/ref]
    <snip> 

    You don't need to put the cursor near the 3-line "=" on the bar to get
    the "drag hand". *Anywhere* on the horizontal partition will do it.

    Also, the "drag hand" is not unique to the Mac. If you've ever used
    Adobe Acrobat Reader on a Windows (or any other) machine, you will know
    that it is the default cursor and used in the same way.

    Cheers,
    Vaughan
    Vaughan Guest

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