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Can't leave setup well enough alone - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

I can't leave my system well enough alone. Once I get it doing what I want, I want to add new stuff, invaribly leading to my clobbering it. Is there a cure for this? If not, is there is a way to revert to stable set-ups, and where can I look to learn how to do that? Thanks, -- Ken...

  1. #1

    Default Can't leave setup well enough alone

    I can't leave my system well enough alone. Once I get it doing what I
    want, I want to add new stuff, invaribly leading to my clobbering it.
    Is there a cure for this? If not, is there is a way to revert to
    stable set-ups, and where can I look to learn how to do that?

    Thanks,

    --
    Ken
    Ken Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Can't leave setup well enough alone

    Ken Loomis wrote:
     

    .... how about citing a couple of examples of what you
    have done to clobber your system? it could be just an
    invalid approach to system updates/installations.
    ..
    --
    /// Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer, skydiver, \\\
    \\\ and author: "Inside Linux", "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed" ///
    \\\ http://pages.sbcglobal.net/mtobler/mjt_linux_page.html ///
    The mosquito is the state bird of New Jersey. - Andy Warhol

    mjt Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Can't leave setup well enough alone

    On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 16:12:53 GMT, mjt
    <com> wrote:
     

    Running an old version of Apache for a few hours and getting attacked,
    I think. My router showed I was sending out a continuous stream of
    data for several hours. Getting my ipchains fouled up, and not really
    understanding what I was doing. Getting into a dependency loop.
    Losing identification of my mouse. An inadequate partition scheme.

    Current remedies: I have registered with rhn. I'm using lokkit. I
    reinstalled to get the mouse right (there must be an easier way?).

    Remaining current issues: I seem not to have enough space to download
    all rhn updates, even though I'm only running apache, gnome, and
    Postgres. The updates download to /home/mydir under the default
    RedHAt 7.2 partition scheme. Maybe there a better place to put them?

    There's no way of my knowing I won't do something stupid or unknowing
    in the future. It would be great if I could revert to a stable setup.

    Ken



    Ken Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Can't leave setup well enough alone

    On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 12:08:00 -0400, Ken Loomis wrote: 

    I have a backup copy on another partition for just in case and fast restore.
    Another copy on another partition for testing.
    I boot test copy and play around. If works, boot production copy,
    install change. Still works, copy production into backup partition.

    Copying partitions is done using rescue mode from cd.

    mount partitions on from_dir and to_dir
    cd /from_dir
    cp * -a /to_dir
    Bit Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Can't leave setup well enough alone


     [/ref]

    If you don't have anything worth keeping on your box, why not
    reformat/reinstall?

    If that's an option, next time you get to the partition stage, use this
    setup:

    - create 80MB /boot partition
    - create a swap partition which is double your RAM size (at least 256MB)
    - use the rest of the space for /

    If you don't mind forking out some cash, you could buy a copy of VMware
    and run test configuration inside a VM, mess around, and use VMware's
    "revert" feature to get back to where you started from. It's *really*
    cool, but ~$300.

    John


    Ken Loomis wrote:
     
    >
    >
    > Running an old version of Apache for a few hours and getting attacked,
    > I think. My router showed I was sending out a continuous stream of
    > data for several hours. Getting my ipchains fouled up, and not really
    > understanding what I was doing. Getting into a dependency loop.
    > Losing identification of my mouse. An inadequate partition scheme.
    >
    > Current remedies: I have registered with rhn. I'm using lokkit. I
    > reinstalled to get the mouse right (there must be an easier way?).
    >
    > Remaining current issues: I seem not to have enough space to download
    > all rhn updates, even though I'm only running apache, gnome, and
    > Postgres. The updates download to /home/mydir under the default
    > RedHAt 7.2 partition scheme. Maybe there a better place to put them?
    >
    > There's no way of my knowing I won't do something stupid or unknowing
    > in the future. It would be great if I could revert to a stable setup.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    >
    >[/ref]

    John Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Can't leave setup well enough alone

    Sound like a plan. Thanks.

    Ken


    On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 17:51:29 GMT, Bit Twister
    <localdomain> wrote:
     
    >
    >I have a backup copy on another partition for just in case and fast restore.
    >Another copy on another partition for testing.
    >I boot test copy and play around. If works, boot production copy,
    >install change. Still works, copy production into backup partition.
    >
    >Copying partitions is done using rescue mode from cd.
    >
    >mount partitions on from_dir and to_dir
    >cd /from_dir
    >cp * -a /to_dir[/ref]

    Ken Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Can't leave setup well enough alone


    "Ken Loomis" <com> wrote in message
    news:com... 
    I also have backup partitions and have the volume labels with a "1" in
    front of the regular name. My fstab uses almost exclusively
    "LABEL=volume_name" as entries. That way, when I hose every thing I can use
    a rescue CD and edit fstab to reflect the "known good" unless it is a
    configuration file or setting located in /etc. I have had to learn the
    hard way to make out a plan on paper of what I want to do and look up the
    files which will be effected.by whatever tools I may use. (I do have a
    back-up of /etc as well.)

    I didn't even know about using rsync for copying partitions until I read it
    in a posting here. I'll have to play with that.

    Another thing I haven't had the time to play with is KickStart and the
    respective equivalent auto-magic installation script generators. I've read
    the docs and played a little, but haven't really gotten to know all of the
    possibilities through practice.

    The docs indicate that the purpose of those programs is to be able to
    recreate your system, all of it's settings and scripts, all of the
    application settings and scripts, and all the updates. This means you burn
    the updates and environmental settings on to a CDR along with a backup of
    the KickStart script (and pre/post install scripts). This gives you a
    complete fresh working and custom install to which you add your mail,
    bookmarks, and other personal stuff.

    The suggestion is to have two different scripts, one exactly matching your
    hardware and one for non-matching hardware (using the detection routines).

    The specific to hardware is really fast--it uses no detection routines; it j
    ust hammers in the files, applies the updates, and then copies in the
    settings and other scripts you created on a working system. I'ts kind of
    cool to watch, the tray pops out for the next CD in a hurry. Not anything
    like the original install.

    You can even script the partition layout or change the partition layout
    completely. Just like with your original install, you can preserve your
    windows, and other O.S. partitions and nuke the rest. The thing is that you
    never will have to go through the install process again. The files are not
    specific to the Version of the Distribution. If a system is rock solid but
    hasn't been updated since Redhat 7.0, the whole thing could be running
    Redhat 9 in less than 30 minutes. (I have spend much more time than that on
    a restoration/repair of a hosed system.)

    It is a text file, and you can make one up for any machine you can get a
    hardware list for. You put it on a vfat floppy.

    It saves all of that disk space for something productive. Your saved files,
    mail, and data should be on their own partition, just like with windows.
    Those things rarely get hosed. Just keep an exact map of the partition
    information. I was able to recover everything after all my partition tables
    got hosed on three out of five drives. You should still keep a backup, but
    gpart saved my whole system, combined with rough map of the drive.

    One thing I still find amazing is how easy it is to update the
    distribution--or--even make a custom set of installation CDs built from the
    originals. It takes some editing, but it isn't the nightmare I imagined the
    process to be.



    Eric Guest

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