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can't partition with RH 9? - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

I need advice about partitioniong with Red Hat 9. I have a single 13 gig IDE hard drive system with Windows 98 loaded. The setup is one primary DOS partition, drive C:, then an extended partition with two logical drives, D: and E:. These together take up half of the drive. Today I tried to install RH 9. I downloaded the ISOs on July 7th, 2003. The installer refused to partition the drive. I fell back on Disk Druid and successfully created a 1 gig root partition and a 150 meg swap partition. When I try to allocate the remaining ...

  1. #1

    Default can't partition with RH 9?

    I need advice about partitioniong with Red Hat 9.

    I have a single 13 gig IDE hard drive system with Windows 98 loaded.
    The setup is one primary DOS partition, drive C:, then an extended
    partition with two logical drives, D: and E:. These together take up
    half of the drive. Today I tried to install RH 9. I downloaded the
    ISOs on July 7th, 2003. The installer refused to partition the drive.
    I fell back on Disk Druid and successfully created a 1 gig root
    partition and a 150 meg swap partition. When I try to allocate the
    remaining space to /home I get a message saying the partition can not
    be created. No reason given. Lots of space remaining.

    Ideas, pointers to more info much appreciated.

    Dave
    Dave Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: can't partition with RH 9?

    Dave Stevens wrote: 

    You would be ahead to make 2 primary partitions for windows if
    that is what you want and leave the rest of the drive as free
    disk space. Then during the linux install make a primary for the
    root partition and any other linux partitions as logical partitions.
    Keep it simple make both swap and /home logical partitions.

    / = 2 to 4 GB depending what you plan to install. RedHat will
    take around 6GB if you install everything included.

    swap = no more than around 256 MB unless you are building a
    server with the possibility of heavy traffic.

    /home = rest of free disk space for linux.
    This will make it easier to upgrade.

    Once you have a better understanding of linux you may find other
    partitions useful. Such as placing /usr & /var on separate
    partitions.

    --
    Confucius: He who play in root, eventually kill tree.
    Registered with The Linux Counter. http://counter.li.org/
    Slackware 9.1.0 Kernel 2.4.22 SMP i686 (GCC) 3.3.2
    Uptime: 20 days, 10:53, 1 user, load average: 0.09, 0.06, 0.01

    David Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: can't partition with RH 9?

    > I need advice about partitioniong with Red Hat 9.

    No. You need advise on partitioning itself.
    This problem has nothing to do with RedHat 9
     

    You ran out of primary partitions. (you can only have 4 of them)
    Either make less linux partitions, or add the free space to the extended
    partition that now only contains D: and E: and create logical partitions

    Eric
    Eric Guest

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