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CD-rs can go bad - Photography

A recent post asked about image storage. For those who think CD-Rs are a good archive medium, take a look at the following: http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/Bad_CD.txt and http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/Bad_CD.jpg Make backups of backups and store them in separate locations. Orrin...

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  1. #1

    Default CD-rs can go bad

    A recent post asked about image storage. For those who think CD-Rs
    are a good archive medium, take a look at the following:

    http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/Bad_CD.txt
    and
    http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/Bad_CD.jpg

    Make backups of backups and store them in separate locations.

    Orrin

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    Orrin Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    You usually get what you pay for. That looked like a generic brand.

    I found it somewhat surprising that 7 months of pictures takes up less than
    one CD, though.


    Ed Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    7 months=1CD?
    I guess you don't take many photos then or have a low resolution camera,
    unless you don't save them all? I just took a quick count, my last years
    shooting is backed up on 55 CD's..not all are full but most are. This
    represents about 10,000 5 megapixel images. I think I'm going to switch to a
    new backup medium, this is too many CDs to keep, they are starting to pile
    up.

    --

    Mikey
    http://www.mike721.com


    "Ed E." <MyPants.net> wrote in message
    news:supernews.com... 
    than 


    Mikey Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    Now that I'm getting into photography more, I'm looking into ways of
    filing negatives, slides, digi images. Once you get them onto a CD, what
    method do you use for being able to locate a photo when you have
    thousands of photos? Is there a program that will print out small
    images of what is on the CD after you burn it?

    Thanks,
    Carole

    Mikey wrote: 

    Carole Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad


    "Carole" <com> wrote in message
    news:bo67pn$14b49o$news.uni-berlin.de... [/ref]
    years [/ref]
    to a [/ref]
    pile 
    >[/ref]
    Windows XP allows you to view thumbnails in a folder, just load in your CD
    and go to explorer, then click on a folder within the CD ,then click view,
    then thumbnails.
    You can even view them as a slideshow using windows XP's picture and fax
    viewer.

    DVD's store gigabytes of information, as opposed to CD's holding a maximum
    of about 750MBs, Then you could always add one , or several, extra hard
    drives to your system and store, at the moment, upto 250GB's on each drive.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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    brian Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    That's what I was thinking. I'm up to my 16th DVD for the past year, but
    I'm also scanning older film for posterity. The last wedding I shot barely
    fit on 2 DVD's.


    Ed Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    Orrin Iseminger wrote: 


    a) as was said before: You get what you pay for. Buying cheap
    "see-through quality" CD-Rs you can't expect much.
    b) CD-Rs as all digitalmedia have got a certain read-write
    lifecycle which amounts to close to infinity for quality cdrs,
    although atm one is advised to store CD-Rs in *dry* and
    dark places, as they are prone to oxidise in the long run.
    The latter being a problem of *all* CDRs and DVDRs alike
    at the moment, although already a new coating has been
    anounced that won't oxidise. Don't know when those are
    to hit the market though.

    All I can recommend:
    * Only Buy quality CDRs (with jewel or slim cases)
    * One Shooting, one CDR (usually amounts to 600mb for
    me anyways).
    * Store them in a location that is suited

    and you're likely to not encounter any of the problems
    mentioned.

    Mathias


    Mathias Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    I see you note to use jewel cases..is there an advantage to storing them
    that way?

    I keep mine on a spindle, I don't handle them much at all, just keep adding
    new ones to the pile, since I also have a full archive on hard disk and
    these are just backup storage. 1 spindle per year seems a logical way to
    organize them, though this could change.

    Keeping them on a spindle makes them much easier to keep in one place. I can
    see that if I was pawing through them all the time this could potentially
    scratch them, but since I don't, I think a spindle is a good way to store
    them.
    Comments?

    --

    Mikey
    http://www.mike721.com


    "Mathias Schmid" <com> wrote in message
    news:bo6g8k$pki$07$t-online.com... 


    Mikey Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    Ed E. wrote:
     

    Huh? Do you shoot at 320x240 or do you just take 10
    shots per month? ;-)

    DVD-R is the way to go. New +/- 4x burners can now be
    had online for $120 or so and blank discs cost as little as
    50 cents each, when bought in bulk (yeah, bulk disc are
    probably not top quality, but for that kind of price, anybody
    can afford to have 4-5 or more backups...)


    Paolo Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    Carole wrote: 

    Windows XP does that, but it's terribly slow with a CD/DVD.
    Firehand Ember (shareware) is MUCH better.


    Paolo Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    Mikey wrote:
     

    ....but a nightmare when you have lots of them and
    you're looking for a particular one. :-)
     

    Exactly, that's another valid issue.
     

    Not needed, you answered yourself. :-)


    Paolo Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 07:03:49 -0800, Orrin Iseminger
    <com> wrote:
     

    One thing that might be a factor - write on them only with pens that
    are designed to write on CDs. I was at Staples looking for a pen
    designed to write on CDs, and they said "we just use these". From
    what I read, standard felt-tip pens will bleed through, making the CD
    unreadable. (I've never experienced that, but I use the proper pens.)
    They said "we just use these". Sure you can write on them with
    standard felt-tip pens, but can you read the disk back in a year
    later?

    Jud Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    After reading all the various viewpoints on the subject, I'll still
    stick with my method of having multiple hard drives in the computer
    for redundancy, and a firewire harddrive externally so I can transport
    them if need be. Granted this requires the other computer has to have
    firewire, but in my world that is exactly why I chose firewire. And
    if I need to burn some files to cd, I can copy them there and treat
    that cd as if were totally expendible.

    2 more cents for the pot.....

    steve
    S Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    On Tue, 04 Nov 2003 02:04:32 GMT, net (S Smith) wrote:
     

    I have 3 computers on my home network, and I have copies of important
    stuff on at least 2 of them. I also make backups to CD.

    Jud Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad



    Paolo Pizzi wrote:
     

    Thanks, I'll take a look at Firehand Ember...I don't have Windows XP. I
    have an old computer which has to do me until I can find a job in
    Seattle somewhere...a new computer is on my wish list though :-)))

    Carole Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    Carole wrote: 
    >
    > Thanks, I'll take a look at Firehand Ember...I don't have Windows XP.
    > I have an old computer which has to do me until I can find a job in
    > Seattle somewhere...a new computer is on my wish list though :-)))[/ref]

    Sorry, I forgot the URL, it will spare you a google search. :-)
    Here it is:

    http://www.firehand.com


    Paolo Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    On Tue, 04 Nov 2003 02:04:32 +0000, S Smith wrote:
     

    for sure!

    I store on 2 hdd's on my pc, and on another computer, and backup on cd
    about once every 3 months (reburning all the cd's)
    it might cost me 15 cd's or so each back, but that $5 of cd's is a cheap
    insurance for a lot of images!
    cvt Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

     

    Not me - I was talking about the original thread author - Orrin.


    Ed Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: CD-rs can go bad

    > After reading all the various viewpoints on the subject, I'll still 

    For what it's worth, I have the same setup. A couple of drives in a RAID-1
    (mirror.) Lightning hit near my house and made it's way up my telephone
    line and fried my motherboard while my PC was on. The motherboard was kind
    enough to mangle the array just before it died. So much for redundancy in
    that case. I had everything backed up onto DVD, but imagine if I depended
    on the drives for archival use.

    Also, hard drives go bad after a few years. You may not even notice that
    bad sectors are popping up under your image files until it's too late. You
    really do need more than one backup method. I personally burn two or three
    identical DVD's on quality media and keep them in separate locations.


    Ed Guest

  20. #20

    Default lightfastness of CDR's

    I personally have very strong supspitions about lightfastness of CDR's.

    The company I used to work for lost quite a lot of data because of CDR
    failure. The thing is that the CD's were only used for a short period, like,
    one month, while a new computer was being built. Of course we checked them
    as we wrote them, and then left them in a pile. The disks were all
    unreadable, and they had all been left in a pile together in the sunlight
    from a window. The pattern on the top was visibly faded.

    So I can't guarantee, but I'm convinced that you should keep CD's in an
    opaque box.


    "Mathias Schmid" <com> wrote in message
    news:bo6g8k$pki$07$t-online.com... 
    >
    >
    > a) as was said before: You get what you pay for. Buying cheap
    > "see-through quality" CD-Rs you can't expect much.
    > b) CD-Rs as all digitalmedia have got a certain read-write
    > lifecycle which amounts to close to infinity for quality cdrs,
    > although atm one is advised to store CD-Rs in *dry* and
    > dark places, as they are prone to oxidise in the long run.
    > The latter being a problem of *all* CDRs and DVDRs alike
    > at the moment, although already a new coating has been
    > anounced that won't oxidise. Don't know when those are
    > to hit the market though.
    >
    > All I can recommend:
    > * Only Buy quality CDRs (with jewel or slim cases)
    > * One Shooting, one CDR (usually amounts to 600mb for
    > me anyways).
    > * Store them in a location that is suited
    >
    > and you're likely to not encounter any of the problems
    > mentioned.
    >
    > Mathias
    >
    >[/ref]


    Martin Guest

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