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Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

I want to be able to copy my /winxp partition on an old disk to a new disk and then boot from the new disk. It was no problem to copy everything over (while Linux was booted) but when I try to boot from the new disk it complains that the disk is not bootable. What do I need to do? I also made the new disk "FAT32" is that going to be a problem once I get it booted? Thanks in advance, John...

  1. #1

    Default Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux

    I want to be able to copy my /winxp partition on an old disk to a new
    disk and then boot from the new disk. It was no problem to copy everything
    over (while Linux was booted) but when I try to boot from the new disk it
    complains that the disk is not bootable. What do I need to do? I also
    made the new disk "FAT32" is that going to be a problem once I get it
    booted?


    Thanks in advance,


    John


    john Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux

    > I want to be able to copy my /winxp partition on an old disk to a new 

    Install a bootloader.

    Eric
    Eric Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux

    john wrote:
     

    .... "what" said the disk isnt bootable?
    ..
    --
    /// Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer, skydiver, \\\
    \\\ and author: "Inside Linux", "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed" ///
    Q: Where can you buy black lace crotchless panties for sheep?
    A: Fredrick's of Ithaca, New York.

    mjt Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux

    On 2003-10-30, john <net> wrote:
     

    What did you use to make the copy?
     

    You probably need to write a boot record for the XP partition. If you boot
    from your XP install CD, you should be able to get to the "Recovery
    Console" which has an option to create a new boot record.
     

    If the original XP installation was on an NTFS filesystem you will
    probably have to reinstall XP to get it to work. Is there a compelling
    reason why you want to use FAT32? NTFS may not be any great shakes as
    far as filesystems go, but it's still a darn sight better than FAT.

    --

    -John (rr.com)
    John Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 03:21:11 +0000, john wrote:
     

    Could be an NTFS issue as suggested -- if a bootloader doesn't work.

    The source machine dual-boots? I use MondoArchive to back up my wife's
    machine with an NT partition.

    If it isn't already dual-boot, a tad convoluted but if nothing else works
    you could do a Knoppix boot and use QtPartEd to make room for a linux dual
    boot -- then use Mondo.

    SMChristenson Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Copy WinXP partition to new disk using Linux

    Thanks for the replies. To clarify where I am on this...
    - 40 gig disk - dual boot with WinXP and Mandrake - works fine
    but can not write to NTFS from Linux.
    - want to move Windows to another disk so I can remove my 40 gig disk
    and switch file systems in the process to FAT32
    - booted Mandrake and made partiton and put on FAT 32 filesystem
    (FAT32 because I want to be able to write to the
    filesystem from Linux and I understand that writing to NTFS
    from Linux does not work yet.)
    - mounted new disk as /newdisk
    - mounted NTFS as /winxp
    - cd /winxp ; find | cpio -pdmvu /newdisk
    - removed 40 gig drive from system
    - tried Mr. Thompson's idea to boot from XP disk as shown below
    - went into recovery mode and ran: fixboot c:
    ( no help. still will not boot)

    - went into recovery mode and ran: fixmbr
    That did not work either
    Part of the motivation here is that if I use the Compaq recovery CD set
    to install the new disk
    it will not give me options about NTFS/FAT32 and will just install
    everything on NTFS including the applications. Compaq also gives
    a somewhat standard XP install CD so that way you can install XP
    the way you want but then there are no application CDs. Applications
    are only included on the special recovery CD set of CDROMS.


    John Thompson wrote: 
    >
    >
    > What did you use to make the copy?
    >

    >
    >
    > You probably need to write a boot record for the XP partition. If you boot
    > from your XP install CD, you should be able to get to the "Recovery
    > Console" which has an option to create a new boot record.
    >

    >
    >
    > If the original XP installation was on an NTFS filesystem you will
    > probably have to reinstall XP to get it to work. Is there a compelling
    > reason why you want to use FAT32? NTFS may not be any great shakes as
    > far as filesystems go, but it's still a darn sight better than FAT.
    >[/ref]

    john Guest

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