Professional Web Applications Themes

Copying B/W Negatives - Photography

I want to make 1:1 copies of 35mm negatives. using a slide copier that is coupled to the camera. Which b/w film & developer do you recommend? Is it possible to use 35mm color print or slide film to make copies? Maximum size prints desired will be 4x5....

  1. #1

    Default Copying B/W Negatives

    I want to make 1:1 copies of 35mm negatives. using a slide copier
    that is coupled to the camera. Which b/w film & developer do
    you recommend? Is it possible to use 35mm color print or slide
    film to make copies? Maximum size prints desired will be 4x5.


    Marvin Rosen Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    "Marvin Rosen" <punsatt.net> wrote
    > I want to make 1:1 copies of 35mm negatives.
    Do you want to make slides from the negatives or do you want to
    make negatives from the negatives?

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio [email]nolindanix.netcom.com[/email]
    Consulting Engineer: Electronics; Informatics; Photonics.
    Nicholas O. Lindan Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    I should have been more explicit!
    I want to make negatives from negatives
    "Marvin Rosen" <punsatt.net> wrote in message
    news:eCRQa.55398$0v4.3784757bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > I want to make 1:1 copies of 35mm negatives. using a slide copier
    > that is coupled to the camera. Which b/w film & developer do
    > you recommend? Is it possible to use 35mm color print or slide
    > film to make copies? Maximum size prints desired will be 4x5.
    >
    >

    Marvin Rosen Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    Marvin Rosen wrote:
    > I should have been more explicit!
    > I want to make negatives from negatives
    Then you'll want either to have B&W film processed for reversal (don't know
    where to point you for that if you don't have your own darkroom) or use
    color slide film.

    --
    John Miller

    For men use, if they have an evil turn, to write it in marble:
    and whoso doth us a good turn we write it in dust.
    -Sir Thomas More

    John Miller Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    "Marvin Rosen" <punsatt.net> wrote
    > I want to make [B&W] negatives from [B&W] negatives
    The shortest route is to use a slide film.
    Three choices are:

    Kodak Edupe Ektachrome - made especially for use in slide
    duplicators, low contrast emulsion. The resulting
    negatives will have some color to them, but this shouldn't
    cause any problem when printing.

    Agfa Scala black & white slide film - a standard B&W slide
    film, you may have trouble controlling contrast

    T-Max 100 & reversal kit - reversal chemistry is available
    from Photographers' Formulary, contrast control may be
    an issue, you will need your own darkroom

    If I was doing this I would try the Edupe first.


    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio [email]nolindanix.netcom.com[/email]
    Consulting Engineer: Electronics; Informatics; Photonics.
    Nicholas O. Lindan Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    Marvin wrote:
    > From the standpoint of simplicity I am looking into
    > the "Kodak edupe ektachrome" Do you think i will
    > need any filters if all i'm interested in is duplicates of
    > b/w negatives? Also i could not find the ISO of this
    > film.
    Go to [url]http://www.kodak.com[/url] and search for Tech Pub E-2529

    Kodak is very coy about the EI. They recommend you look for
    it somewhere in the range 4 - 40. I guess they want you
    to have to buy two rolls: one to find the EI and the other
    one to make the dupes.

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio [email]nolindanix.netcom.com[/email]
    Consulting Engineer: Electronics; Informatics; Photonics.
    Nicholas O. Lindan Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    "Marvin Rosen" <punsatt.net> wrote in message news:<9FSQa.55442$0v4.3788674bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>...
    > I should have been more explicit!
    > I want to make negatives from negatives
    > "Marvin Rosen" <punsatt.net> wrote in message
    > news:eCRQa.55398$0v4.3784757bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > > I want to make 1:1 copies of 35mm negatives. using a slide copier
    > > that is coupled to the camera. Which b/w film & developer do
    > > you recommend? Is it possible to use 35mm color print or slide
    > > film to make copies? Maximum size prints desired will be 4x5.
    > >
    > >
    To be quite blunt, this makes no sense for most purposes, as a
    duplicate negative will never be as sharp as the original. Kodak make
    some B&W duplicating films for this purpose, and these are darkroom
    films that you expose and develop like paper. The films are 'printed'
    by contact with the original negative, as optical would be inferior.

    [url]http://www.kodak.com/global/en/business/docimaging/globalPages/tabbedContent.jhtml?id=3100020&show=3100131[/url]
    Michael Scarpitti Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    "Marvin Rosen" <punsatt.net> wrote in message news:<eCRQa.55398$0v4.3784757bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>...
    > I want to make 1:1 copies of 35mm negatives. using a slide copier
    > that is coupled to the camera. Which b/w film & developer do
    > you recommend? Is it possible to use 35mm color print or slide
    > film to make copies? Maximum size prints desired will be 4x5.
    Do you understand this will give you TERRIBLE negatives?

    Those slide copiers are horrible optically.
    Michael Scarpitti Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    In rec.photo.darkroom Nicholas O. Lindan <nolindanix.netcom.com> wrote:
    >
    > Peter <pirwinktb.net> wrote
    >> You might want to try Eastman 5360 Direct MP film. It is a very slow
    >> (around EI 0.3) copy film which forms direct positives (or in your
    >> case direct negative copies) with normal black and white developer.
    >
    > The directions for it imply contacting in a machine for making dupes
    > of B&W movies - which I sort of discounted most folks having access
    > to, and so I passed it by.
    >
    > But, yes, there is nothing to preclude cutting the stuff up in 6-exposure
    > strips and contacting it to the original negative strips. 5360 is ortho,
    > so you can use it with a red safelight, making the job easier.
    I had a go at dupliciating negatives tonight with 5360 in a Leitz
    Eldia contact printer. I think that 7 minutes in D76 1:1 is about
    right. My original estimate wasn't near enough. It also requires
    exposures several times those of fast enlarging papers or 5302
    Fine grain Release Positive.

    I won't know for sure until I print them, but I think that the
    duplicates are of decent quality. They certainly look sharp
    with a 10x loupe.
    > This may be the best solution. Chuck the slide duplicator.
    You could use 5360 in a good setup with a proper macro
    lens and it would make dust much easier to control.
    The Eldia contact printer does a wonderful job, but I find
    it very difficult to get all surfaces dust free.
    >On the emulsion side, [url]http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/lab/5234.shtml[/url],
    > appears to be Kodak's recommendation for the highest quality reproduction.
    > It is a negative/positive process, but you would end up with a set
    > of B&W slides as the 'internegative'.
    >
    Let me know if you can get 5234 neg and 5366 master positive film
    in short lengths. I think the smallest unit Kodak sells them in is
    1000 feet. They are pretty cheap by the foot, but it does seem
    like a lot to have in my fridge.

    Peter.
    ---
    [email]pirwinktb.net[/email]

    Peter Irwin Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    In article <bf50op$gkv$1dns.ktb.net>,
    Peter Irwin <pirwinktb.net> writes:
    >
    > I had a go at dupliciating negatives tonight with 5360 in a Leitz
    > Eldia contact printer. I think that 7 minutes in D76 1:1 is about
    > right. My original estimate wasn't near enough. It also requires
    > exposures several times those of fast enlarging papers or 5302
    > Fine grain Release Positive.
    >
    I wonder - would it be possible to make B&W slides from B&W negs by
    contact. Assuming contrast would be low I'd assume that one would need
    to push the film a lot to boost it. Would the result be too grainy?

    --
    [email]petepetezilla.co.uk[/email]
    [url]http://www.petezilla.co.uk[/url]

    Peter Chant Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives


    "Peter Chant" <petepetezilla.co.uk> wrote ...
    >>
    > I wonder - would it be possible to make B&W slides from B&W negs by
    > contact. Assuming contrast would be low I'd assume that one would need
    > to push the film a lot to boost it. Would the result be too grainy?
    >
    Well, one thing is for certain, it would give better results than trying to
    produce B&W slides by cross-processing some of the chromogenic C-41 B&W
    films in E-6 chemistry. Unless, of course, you like a nasty green cast on
    your B&W Slides


    Tony Parkinson Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Copying B/W Negatives

    In rec.photo.darkroom Peter Chant <petepetezilla.co.uk> wrote:
    > In article <bf50op$gkv$1dns.ktb.net>,
    > Peter Irwin <pirwinktb.net> writes:
    >>
    >> I had a go at dupliciating negatives tonight with 5360 in a Leitz
    >> Eldia contact printer. I think that 7 minutes in D76 1:1 is about
    >> right. My original estimate wasn't near enough. It also requires
    >> exposures several times those of fast enlarging papers or 5302
    >> Fine grain Release Positive.
    >>
    >
    > I wonder - would it be possible to make B&W slides from B&W negs by
    > contact. Assuming contrast would be low I'd assume that one would need
    > to push the film a lot to boost it. Would the result be too grainy?
    >
    You can use Eastman 5302 Fine Grain Release Positive film
    to print slides from negatives. It is movie print film,
    which has an emulsion similar to enlargement papers.
    You can use the same safelight that you use with paper.

    Developement in straight Dektol for 4 minutes give good results
    for many negatives. You can vary the contrast by choice of
    developer. D-76 gives softer results, I understand that D-19
    gives harder results, but I haven't tried it.

    The film is very fine grained, even when developed in Dektol.

    Peter.
    ---
    [email]pirwinktb.net[/email]
    Peter Irwin Guest

Similar Threads

  1. printing B&W negatives
    By Leslie_Parr@adobeforums.com in forum Adobe Photoshop Mac CS, CS2 & CS3
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: March 4th, 08:39 PM
  2. flatten negatives?
    By Jan Philips in forum Photography
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 7th, 05:44 PM
  3. negatives into positives
    By john firth in forum Photography
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 22nd, 12:21 PM
  4. How best to clean old negatives?
    By Editor www.nutritionsoftware.org in forum Photography
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 16th, 03:05 PM
  5. Cleaning Negatives
    By mcl in forum Photography
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 15th, 10:50 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139