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Copying Directory Structures - SCO

"Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message news:tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03... > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5 server > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new server > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed and can > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to copy > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact, from > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I > believe that ...

  1. #1

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message
    news:tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03...
    > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5 server
    > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new server
    > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed and
    can
    > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to copy
    > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact,
    from
    > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    > believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up from
    > one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    > process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    > something else? What is the syntax of the command. Let's say, for the
    > purposes of this example, that the names of the systems are "oldsystem"
    and
    > "newsystem" and the IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2
    > respectively.
    >
    > Thank you for any help you can give.
    >
    > Joe Burns, President
    > CompuGeek, L.L.C.
    If the two machines are on the same local network, why not mount the
    directory of the first machine to the second and just 'copy' at will?

    Ron



    Ronald J Marchand Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    In article <tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03> "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> writes:
    $ Now I need to copy
    $the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact, from
    $the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    $believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up from
    $one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    $process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    $something else?

    I'm not claiming this is necessarily the best way, but I've done
    this before using rcmd - something like (run this on the source machine):

    find | cpio -o | rcmd destinationmachine "cd /wherever; cpio -i"

    You'll have to add appropriate arguments to the find and cpio
    and cpio commands; the man pages for those two have plenty of
    information.

    Doing it this way, you don't have any temporary files; the output
    of cpio on the source machine is fed across the network to the input
    of cpio on the destination machine.
    --
    Stephen M. Dunn <stephenstevedunn.ca>
    >>>----------------> [url]http://www.stevedunn.ca/[/url] <----------------<<<
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Say hi to my cat -- [url]http://www.stevedunn.ca/photos/toby/[/url]
    Stephen M. Dunn Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    Stephen M. Dunn typed (on Tue, Jul 22, 2003 at 04:40:04PM +0000):
    | In article <tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03> "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> writes:
    | $ Now I need to copy
    | $the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact, from
    | $the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    | $believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up from
    | $one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    | $process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    | $something else?
    |
    | I'm not claiming this is necessarily the best way, but I've done
    | this before using rcmd - something like (run this on the source machine):
    |
    | find | cpio -o | rcmd destinationmachine "cd /wherever; cpio -i"
    |
    | You'll have to add appropriate arguments to the find and cpio
    | and cpio commands; the man pages for those two have plenty of
    | information.
    |
    | Doing it this way, you don't have any temporary files; the output
    | of cpio on the source machine is fed across the network to the input
    | of cpio on the destination machine.

    Is this any better than using rdist (or rsync)?

    --
    JP
    Jean-Pierre Radley Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    I have never done that in SCO. Can you, or someone else, give me the
    command to do so? I also need to ensure that all of the privileges and
    ownerships remain the same.

    Thank you,

    Joe Burns

    "Ronald J Marchand" <rojomarcovad.net> wrote in message
    news:bfjah8$sse$1sun-news.laserlink.net...
    > "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message
    > news:tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03...
    > > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5
    server
    > > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new
    server
    > > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed and
    > can
    > > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to
    copy
    > > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact,
    > from
    > > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    > > believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up
    from
    > > one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    > > process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    > > something else? What is the syntax of the command. Let's say, for the
    > > purposes of this example, that the names of the systems are "oldsystem"
    > and
    > > "newsystem" and the IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2
    > > respectively.
    > >
    > > Thank you for any help you can give.
    > >
    > > Joe Burns, President
    > > CompuGeek, L.L.C.
    >
    > If the two machines are on the same local network, why not mount the
    > directory of the first machine to the second and just 'copy' at will?
    >
    > Ron
    >
    >
    >

    Joe Burns Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message
    news:YgmTa.25140$b03.24330lakeread03...
    > I have never done that in SCO. Can you, or someone else, give me the
    > command to do so? I also need to ensure that all of the privileges and
    > ownerships remain the same.
    >
    > Thank you,
    >
    > Joe Burns
    >
    This group takes a "dim" view of top posting.

    Start by reading "man nfs" and "man exports". This should get you started
    on the yellow brick road. Then if you have a specific question, just ask
    away.

    Ron

    > "Ronald J Marchand" <rojomarcovad.net> wrote in message
    > news:bfjah8$sse$1sun-news.laserlink.net...
    > > "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message
    > > news:tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03...
    > > > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5
    > server
    > > > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new
    > server
    > > > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed
    and
    > > can
    > > > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to
    > copy
    > > > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc
    intact,
    > > from
    > > > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    > > > believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up
    > from
    > > > one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    > > > process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    > > > something else? What is the syntax of the command. Let's say, for
    the
    > > > purposes of this example, that the names of the systems are
    "oldsystem"
    > > and
    > > > "newsystem" and the IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2
    > > > respectively.
    > > >
    > > > Thank you for any help you can give.
    > > >
    > > > Joe Burns, President
    > > > CompuGeek, L.L.C.
    > >
    > > If the two machines are on the same local network, why not mount the
    > > directory of the first machine to the second and just 'copy' at will?
    > >
    > > Ron

    Ronald J Marchand Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    Joe Burns made comment on Tue Jul 22 12:58:17 2003 :
    > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5 server
    > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new server
    > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed and can
    > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to copy
    > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact, from
    > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    > believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up from
    > one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    > process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    > something else? What is the syntax of the command. Let's say, for the
    > purposes of this example, that the names of the systems are "oldsystem" and
    > "newsystem" and the IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2
    > respectively.
    >
    One option that has not been mentioned yet:

    OldSystem> tar cvf /tmp/blah /path/to/directory/to/copy
    OldSystem> gzip /tmp/blah

    Now use rcp, ftp, floppy, tape etc. to copy /tmp/blah.gz to NewSystem

    NewSystem> gzip -d /tmp/blah.gz
    NewSystem> tar xvf /tmp/blah

    Yes you could use a couple of pipelines to reduce the number of
    commands and temp files - but it is easy to follow this way :-)

    Tom

    --
    ================================================== ======================
    Tom Melvin [email]tomtkrh.demon.co.uk[/email] [url]http://www.tkrh.demon.co.uk[/url]
    Veterinary Solutions Ltd Sysop Compuserve Unixforum
    ================================================== ======================
    Tom Melvin Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    Dear Joe

    edit /etc/hosts in your new system and add the name and Ip address for
    the old system. You should add the following line to the file:

    oldsystem 192.168.1.2

    edit (or create) the file /etc/exports in your old system. It should
    mention the filesystems you want to export (make available) for the
    new system: It should look something like this (I assume you have a /u
    filesystem created, in case the name of it is different use the one
    that corresponds)

    /
    /u

    Once you did these, you should be able to run this command in your
    newsystem:

    mount -f NFS oldsystem:/ /mnt (this mounts the root filesystem)

    or

    mount -f NFS oldsystem:/u (this mounts the /u filesystem)

    Then can use any ¨copy¨ command you like, I usually run

    copy -mrov /mnt /u

    This will copy the whole contents of your old /u filesystem to your
    new /u filesystem. You can be more specific if you like. copy will
    create directories for you if they do not exist previously.

    Beware of file permissions if they already exist in your new
    filesystem, they may not be rewriten depending on them.

    Good luck

    "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message news:<tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03>...
    > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5 server
    > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new server
    > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed and can
    > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to copy
    > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact, from
    > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    > believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up from
    > one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    > process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    > something else? What is the syntax of the command. Let's say, for the
    > purposes of this example, that the names of the systems are "oldsystem" and
    > "newsystem" and the IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2
    > respectively.
    >
    > Thank you for any help you can give.
    >
    > Joe Burns, President
    > CompuGeek, L.L.C.
    Jose Tabisi Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    Thanks for the input. I was able to get the files using the following
    steps:

    1. Used "tar cvf" to create a backup file of the "/usr2" filesystem
    2. Used "ftp" to copy my backup file to the other system
    3. Setup all user IDs and groups EXACTLY like they did on the old system
    on the new
    4. Used "tar xvf" to extract the contents of my backup to the new server

    All of the files were created where I wanted them with the security settings
    the way I wanted.

    I would like to thank everyone for their help.

    Now I have two new problems. First, some files appear to be simply
    reference pointers to other files in other locations - potientally to other
    file systems. How do I identify these items and get them transferred fairly
    easily - or do I have to go file by file. The second is an easy one that I
    can't remenber. I need to have "ctree" start automatically at startup
    ("ctstart") and also shutdown gracefully (ctstop) when the system is
    shutdown. I have looked in all of the files in "/etc/rc2.d" with no
    success. Any ideas?

    Thanks again:

    Joe Burns

    "Jose Tabisi" <josetabisitecnitower.com.ar> wrote in message
    news:c8f61b71.0307251321.4f2c2a6dposting.google.c om...
    > Dear Joe
    >
    > edit /etc/hosts in your new system and add the name and Ip address for
    > the old system. You should add the following line to the file:
    >
    > oldsystem 192.168.1.2
    >
    > edit (or create) the file /etc/exports in your old system. It should
    > mention the filesystems you want to export (make available) for the
    > new system: It should look something like this (I assume you have a /u
    > filesystem created, in case the name of it is different use the one
    > that corresponds)
    >
    > /
    > /u
    >
    > Once you did these, you should be able to run this command in your
    > newsystem:
    >
    > mount -f NFS oldsystem:/ /mnt (this mounts the root filesystem)
    >
    > or
    >
    > mount -f NFS oldsystem:/u (this mounts the /u filesystem)
    >
    > Then can use any ¨copy¨ command you like, I usually run
    >
    > copy -mrov /mnt /u
    >
    > This will copy the whole contents of your old /u filesystem to your
    > new /u filesystem. You can be more specific if you like. copy will
    > create directories for you if they do not exist previously.
    >
    > Beware of file permissions if they already exist in your new
    > filesystem, they may not be rewriten depending on them.
    >
    > Good luck
    >
    > "Joe Burns" <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote in message
    news:<tF9Ta.23684$b03.1019lakeread03>...
    > > I am in the process of converting a customer from an old SCO 5.0.5
    server
    > > (they have been running this hardware for about 10 years) to a new
    server
    > > running SCO 5.0.6. I have the new SCO Enterprise version installed and
    can
    > > do a "rlogin" across the network to the other system. Now I need to
    copy
    > > the entire contents, with the same file ownerships, groups, etc intact,
    from
    > > the old system to the new system. I can't remember how to do that. I
    > > believe that I used to use UUCP between servers when I would dial-up
    from
    > > one city to the other (about 10 years ago), but I never had to do this
    > > process across an Ethernet connection. Would I use "uucp" or "rcp" or
    > > something else? What is the syntax of the command. Let's say, for the
    > > purposes of this example, that the names of the systems are "oldsystem"
    and
    > > "newsystem" and the IP addresses are 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2
    > > respectively.
    > >
    > > Thank you for any help you can give.
    > >
    > > Joe Burns, President
    > > CompuGeek, L.L.C.

    Joe Burns Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    In article <HxkXa.12243$tf.6706lakeread03>,
    Joe Burns <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote:
    >Thanks for the input. I was able to get the files using the following
    >steps:
    >
    >1. Used "tar cvf" to create a backup file of the "/usr2" filesystem
    >2. Used "ftp" to copy my backup file to the other system
    >3. Setup all user IDs and groups EXACTLY like they did on the old system
    >on the new
    >4. Used "tar xvf" to extract the contents of my backup to the new server
    >
    >All of the files were created where I wanted them with the security settings
    >the way I wanted.
    >
    >I would like to thank everyone for their help.
    >
    >Now I have two new problems. First, some files appear to be simply
    >reference pointers to other files in other locations - potientally to other
    >file systems. How do I identify these items and get them transferred fairly
    >easily - or do I have to go file by file.
    Depending on your application, it may be appropriate to replace those pointers
    with the contents of the files they point to. In that case you can use tar to
    create a backup as you originally did, but also using the 'L' tar keyletter.
    See the tar man page.
    >The second is an easy one that I
    >can't remenber. I need to have "ctree" start automatically at startup
    >("ctstart") and also shutdown gracefully (ctstop) when the system is
    >shutdown. I have looked in all of the files in "/etc/rc2.d" with no
    >success. Any ideas?
    Start it in /etc/rc2.d/P87USRDAEMON. Create a script in /etc/rc0.d (using one
    of the existing scripts as a template) to stop it.

    John
    --
    John DuBois [email]spcecdtarmory.com[/email] KC6QKZ/AE [url]http://www.armory.com/~spcecdt/[/url]
    John DuBois Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Copying Directory Structures

    Thank you. I will look into the "L" switch - I must have missed that one.
    Hopefully this will finish this task.

    Joe Burns

    "John DuBois" <spcecdtdeeptht.armory.com> wrote in message
    news:3f2ebf39$0$1102$8eec23anewsreader.tycho.net. ..
    > In article <HxkXa.12243$tf.6706lakeread03>,
    > Joe Burns <joeburnscallageek.com> wrote:
    > >Thanks for the input. I was able to get the files using the following
    > >steps:
    > >
    > >1. Used "tar cvf" to create a backup file of the "/usr2" filesystem
    > >2. Used "ftp" to copy my backup file to the other system
    > >3. Setup all user IDs and groups EXACTLY like they did on the old
    system
    > >on the new
    > >4. Used "tar xvf" to extract the contents of my backup to the new
    server
    > >
    > >All of the files were created where I wanted them with the security
    settings
    > >the way I wanted.
    > >
    > >I would like to thank everyone for their help.
    > >
    > >Now I have two new problems. First, some files appear to be simply
    > >reference pointers to other files in other locations - potientally to
    other
    > >file systems. How do I identify these items and get them transferred
    fairly
    > >easily - or do I have to go file by file.
    >
    > Depending on your application, it may be appropriate to replace those
    pointers
    > with the contents of the files they point to. In that case you can use
    tar to
    > create a backup as you originally did, but also using the 'L' tar
    keyletter.
    > See the tar man page.
    >
    > >The second is an easy one that I
    > >can't remenber. I need to have "ctree" start automatically at startup
    > >("ctstart") and also shutdown gracefully (ctstop) when the system is
    > >shutdown. I have looked in all of the files in "/etc/rc2.d" with no
    > >success. Any ideas?
    >
    > Start it in /etc/rc2.d/P87USRDAEMON. Create a script in /etc/rc0.d (using
    one
    > of the existing scripts as a template) to stop it.
    >
    > John
    > --
    > John DuBois [email]spcecdtarmory.com[/email] KC6QKZ/AE
    [url]http://www.armory.com/~spcecdt/[/url]


    Joe Burns Guest

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