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CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas? - Adobe Photoshop 7, CS, CS2 & CS3

After dredging through the marketese on Pshop CS, I find that there are a couple of new features that I'd like to have, they've even got an enticing upgrade that would land me a couple of nice-to-have, though not needed programs in a "suite" deal. The product activation has soured it for me, though. What are my options? 1) Bend over and let Adobe have its way (painful). 2) Stick with version 7, which works well for me (Adobe gains no revenue, I don't get the new features). 3) Wait until there's a code hack, then buy (Adobe doesn't get ...

  1. #1

    Default CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    After dredging through the marketese on Pshop CS, I find that there
    are a couple of new features that I'd like to have, they've even got
    an enticing upgrade that would land me a couple of nice-to-have,
    though not needed programs in a "suite" deal. The product activation
    has soured it for me, though. What are my options? 1) Bend over and
    let Adobe have its way (painful). 2) Stick with version 7, which
    works well for me (Adobe gains no revenue, I don't get the new
    features). 3) Wait until there's a code hack, then buy (Adobe doesn't
    get the clue, they do get the revenue, I get the features).

    None of the above sound like a win-win to me.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Why would you define the product activation as a lose-lose situation?

    Adobe doesn't require you to sign away your firstborn, give up a limb or two, or make a pact with the devil or anything. You click a few buttons and its done.
    Oliver, Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Why should I give any software house more information that I want? Why should I let them know how often I change my kit, or move the program from one machine to another?

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    All activation does is make it harder/impossible to "casually" pirate the software - you know, install it on your friends' and your brother-in-law's machines as well as your own. Many of us may have gotten used to this sort of sharing over the years, but Adobe, like any other corporation, is in business to make money, and as part of that effort is closing off as many leaks in the revenue stream as they can.

    You would do the same if it was your company. Things aren't as much fun for the end user as they used to be, but that's life in the big, capitalist city.

    Enforcing the EULA is the software producer's right. As so many end users treat the rules casually, Adobe - and others - have little choice if they want to continue doing business. And it is, as Robert points out, a very small inconvenience to set up activation.

    It's a nicer approach than the RIAA has taken. Be grateful.
    johnson, Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Because that's the only way it's going to work, that's why. Stop being
    so damned paranoid. This activation scare is absolutely ridiculous.
    You'd think Adobe had installed spy cams in your bedroom.

    Bob

    Levine, Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    I do work for a software company, and am certainly not happy about piracy - I've reported commercial scams to other companies more than once. The only intallations which activation catches, that would mean more revenue for Adobe, is the businesses that fudge licenses; those that want the program but won't pay for it will find a way to cirvent. The rest of us will just let our privacy be eroded a grain at a time.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Robert, it isn't going to work that way, either. Take a cruise on the net, and you'll find programs broken before they're released.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    it's anonymous according to their description of it.
    milbut, Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    > The rest of us will just let our privacy be eroded a grain at a time.

    You've been watching too many movies. Just exactly how does this invade
    your privacy?

    Bob

    Levine, Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Tim,

    I work at a company that has dozens of Photoshop licenses in this building alone, and many more elsewhere. There is very strict management of license use here, and there are frequent spot checks on a random basis to make sure nothing fishy is going on. There is no fudging going on here. If there are more seats than licenses, we buy more licenses.

    There may in fact be corporate license fraud taking place, but not at the major studios. We have way too much to lose to play games.

    What individual home users do with their software has always been harder to control - until now. I think it's about time.
    johnson, Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Hi Dave,

    sure, this one is anonymous, but when this scheme doesn't work...

    You're still forced to feed their data gathering group. One of the major problems with any market research is how skewed the data source is, if they enforce global response, you're forced to be in a marketing data pool whether you want to or not... well, your option is not to buy.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Tim,

    It's not YOU that's in a marketing data pool, it's your machine. Nobody knows - or cares - who you are at Adobe.
    johnson, Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Hi Dennis,

    I've also seen licenses passed within companies with the understanding that they'll be made ligit, sometime. I agree that the casual user's passing copies is a leakage that we'd like to stop, but wonder if this is 1) a reasonable answer, and 2) one that works.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Hi Dennis,

    but I'm the one that is buying and reconfiguring my machines. As tied as I am to my machines, it's hard to tell the difference, sometimes.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Tim wrote:

    sure, this one is anonymous, but when this scheme doesn't work...




    Your comment here counts as FUD: Fear, Uncertainty, & Doubt. You're complaining about stuff that's not decided yet and may not ever happen. Come on.

    ~Hanford
    lemoore, Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Our company is so freaked about licensing that a recent audit turned up over 9500 licenses for an MS project planner when we only have about 3000 people using it. Instead of using the unused/turned over (layoff, job change, etc) licenses, they were just ordering new ones every time someone needed a copy. Sheesh. Talk about waste!
    milbut, Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    At least the money went to a good cause.
    r_harvey@adobeforums.com Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Hi Hanford,

    worry about it now, or worry about it later, and I'll self-censor before I get into a political discussion. I don't think that Adobe, or Macromedia, or Microsoft, are going to realise expected revenue from these schemes, nor do I think that they'll back off instead of turning the s tighter.

    Tim
    Spragens, Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Tim,

    "I don't think that Adobe, or Macromedia, or Microsoft, are going to realise expected revenue from these schemes, nor do I think that they'll back off instead of turning the s tighter."

    I think you're wrong here. Windows XP saw record sales and revenue for Microsoft, not an easy feat considering how much that company makes on most of their products, despite the much maligned product activation. I suspect a great part of these record sales were people finally realizing the game was up and if they wanted to use XP they had to pay for its use. I was part of the original Office 2000 activation beta test and currently use Windows XP. To this day I have had absolutely no problems with either and I still use Office 2000 (so much for the "forced upgrade gravy train" conspiracy theory) to this day. Product activation works for its intended prupose, casual copying of software whether it be for home or business use, and it is for this reason that Adobe considered using it for their new Creative Suite applications.
    McCoy, Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: CS - isn't that some sort of nerve gas?

    Will be interesting to see how things play out for Adobe and Macromedia.

    The Windows gravy train is new computer sales. That doesn't apply to Adobe and Macromedia.

    Adobe's gravy is probably from corporate users, and the Q/A on activation says it's not needed for corporate licenses.

    Maybe we individual purchasers are not significant to the revenue stream.

    But I'm voting with my few dollars -- against activation. I'll stick with Photoshop 7, just as I've stuck with Windows 2000.

    Would be nice to have the new features. But I want to be in control of my computer.
    Spragens, Guest

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