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CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to the shape of another object??? - Adobe Illustrator Windows

Say I have an oval...and I want to fit the word "Adobe" into that oval so that it takes on the oval shape - without dinking around with envelopes, etc. Is this an option?...

  1. #1

    Default CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to the shape of another object???

    Say I have an oval...and I want to fit the word "Adobe" into that oval so that it takes on the oval shape - without dinking around with envelopes, etc.

    Is this an option?
    Tom_Walace@adobeforums.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    I suspect you'll find yourself "dinking around" with an envelope or a warp.

    Maybe someone else will come up with an alternative.
    John Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Why in the world would you not want to "dink around" with an Envelope? That's all an envelope is, is a way to fit one object into the shape of another. There has to be some command that means "do it", and the name of that command is "Object>Envelope Distort>Make with Top Object". Very simple.

    You can Expand the envelope after making it, if the issue is that having made it once, you no longer want to adjust the envelope shape.
    Teri Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Is there a way I can type the word "Adobe" into Illustrator--you know, without having to dink around with the text tool?

    ;-)

    JET
    James_E._Talmage@adobeforums.com Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    I didn't think you had it in you, JET, being a smart butt...
    Bert Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Hahaha...you're kidding right Bert? There's a never ending supply of smart ss's around. ;-)

    Teri - I fully understand and use the Envelope tool....however, the propensity of the Envelope feature creating very wavy vertical strokes of lettering when manipulated is a real problem - in many cases.

    A simple "snap to fit" function could be a very nice feature...and I was thinking there was something like this in CS2....I may be confusing that with CorelDraw....I'll double check Draw.

    Adobe should really consider getting their hands on a copy of Flexi or Gerber Omega or some of the other vector sign software titles.....they have some phenomenal features that would cross over beautifully into Illustrator. I cannot imagine any Illustrator user having a problem with that.

    In the interim of checking back here - I did use the Envelope tool to distort the lettering - - and then used that lettering (complete with whacked out vertical strokes, etc.) as a template and redrew each letter to straighten things out.....no problem...but just thinking there might have been some "fit to object" function here.

    Thanks all.
    Tom_Walace@adobeforums.com Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Tom, i don't know what your original post was all about, it's the same in Omega and CorelDraw, just that it's named differently. I mean you still have to execute a command. And i don't think Illustrator can learn anything from Omega - Well there was a couple of things i thought of once, but anyway, it certainly wasn't the way it handled "envelope distortation". First of all - How the hell are you supposed to distort stuff without a "decent" preview?
    Dean_M@adobeforums.com Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Tom:

    Here's a pdf (customized just for YOU!) that can be opened in Illustrator with some envelopes that don't distort funny.

    <http://www.itchybug.com/distortadobe.pdf>

    Bert
    Bert Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Nice warping Bert!
    Dean_M@adobeforums.com Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Damn straight!
    Bert Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    As a rule of thumb, as long as you move anchors and/or control points straight up and down, the distortion will be along the vertical axis only.

    Place guides right on the anchors/control points (because smart guides are buggy with envelope meshes) to stay on track.

    It helps to warp a grid before applying the mesh to the final object, just so you can see the distortion "live".

    Bert
    Bert Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???



    In the interim of checking back here - I did use the Envelope tool to
    distort the lettering - - and then used that lettering (complete with
    whacked out vertical strokes, etc.) as a template and redrew each letter
    to straighten things out.....no problem...but just thinking there might
    have been some "fit to object" function here.




    OK, you seem to be confusing the issue of whether or not objects get reshaped horizontally as well as vertically with the matter of whether there is a "Fit to Shape" command. The fact that you wish your objects to maintain their vertical lines and distort in height only is completely separate from whether the command is called Fit to Shape versus Make with Top Objct.

    The meaning of "fitting" something to a shape usually is to fit it in all directions. For example, what if the object you were fitting the text to was shaped like an hourglass, where it is straight on the top and bottom and the only curvature is on the sides? How in the world could anything be fit into that shape without distorting the verticals? If the shape to which it is being fit has curvature at the sides, and you are not making the object you're fitting to it stretch to follow those side curves, you are not really fitting it to that shape!

    So, if you want the vertical lines to stay straight, you have two choices:

    1. Do not use a shape to define the distortion. Instead, use one of the predefined Warps that is set to distort only the height and leave the verticals straight. These include Arch, Lower Arc, Upper Arc, and Bulge. Note that you can combine a sequence of multiple distortions. For example, you can apply Upper Arc followed by Arch if you want to curve both the top and the bottom, but you want to curve the top more than the bottom. You can use either Envelope Distort>Make with Warp or the warp live effect from the Effect>Warp menu.

    2. Use a shape, but construct that shape so that the left and right sides are straight and only the top and the bottom curve. For example, here are two shapes that I am about to use as envelopes:

    And here is how they look after Envelope Distort>Make with Top Object:


    In both cases it is fitting the text to the shape that is given.

    There is no way in Illustrator to get the right hand distortion if you start with the left hand selection. If that is what you want, you aren't really asking for "Fit to Shape", you are asking for "Fit Vertically to Shape". Although there is no specific command for Fit Vertically to Shape, one of the two methods above should enable you to get the results you want.
    Teri Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Teri:

    I may have described things inaccurately, then. I understood that making an envelope with the top object (which is what I usually start with) essentially creates a mesh with one column and one row, or at least an object that operates as such. Is that incorrect?

    Bert
    Bert Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Bert,

    No, you are right that Make with Top object converts the path to a mesh with one row and one column, pretty much the same as if you had selected the path and said Create Gradient Mesh and then entered 1 in both fields, and then made the Envelope from that mesh.

    Like I said, it will work perfectly fine to start with a mesh and then move the mesh points. I just wouldn't think of explicitly making a mesh as being the easiest way to start unless you wanted to have more than one row or column and adjust them to control the interior detail of the distortion. Otherwise it's like the mesh isn't "buying" you anything that starting with a path wouldn't give you.
    Teri Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Thanks Teri - that's what I'm looking for....how'd I miss that? I was thinking there was some fit to shape kind of thingy available.
    Tom_Walace@adobeforums.com Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: CS2 - Can you "Fit" an object to theshape of another object???

    Well, Tom, my main point was that there is a "fit to shape kind of thingy" available, but you don't really want a "fit to shape kind of thingy". You want a "fit to shape vertically only ignoring any curves on the sides of the shape" kind of thingy, and there isn't exactly one of those.

    But for many standard shapes, the warps work, and for other shapes, making sure the sides of the shape you're fitting to are straight will work.
    Teri Guest

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