Professional Web Applications Themes

Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug" - Mac Applications & Software

I stumbled across a strange Apple bug recently, do not have the foggiest idea how it originated. Can wiser heads than mine shed some light on this strange bug? The "Volume Modification" sector of my HFS+ partitions, sector two of any partition you care to look at, shows a "Volume Modification Date" of August 11, 2003, in a narrow range of times between 10:00 AM and 11:20 AM (those times are in the _future_) Now unless I accidentally invented a time-machine in my fooling around here, the present time according to my computer clock right now this instant is 3:34 ...

  1. #1

    Default Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"


    I stumbled across a strange Apple bug recently, do not have the
    foggiest idea how it originated.

    Can wiser heads than mine shed some light on this strange bug?

    The "Volume Modification" sector of my HFS+ partitions, sector two of
    any partition you care to look at, shows a "Volume Modification Date"
    of August 11, 2003, in a narrow range of times between 10:00 AM and
    11:20 AM (those times are in the _future_)

    Now unless I accidentally invented a time-machine in my fooling around
    here, the present time according to my computer clock right now this
    instant is 3:34 AM on the 11th of August, 2003.

    I first noticed this flaw yesterday, August 10th, the "Volume
    Modification Date" was exactly the same as described above.

    If I wait 7 more hours, at least the "Volume Modification Date" will
    not be in the future.

    Did I invent a futuristic time machine, or is there a more rational
    explanation?

    Gotta know real quick, because if this thingy is a time machine, I
    won't be able to prove it if more than 7 hours go by.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <110820030346061721%invalid>, Mark Conrad
    <invalid> wrote:
     

    its greenwich mean time not your own timezone.

    just look at the headers in your post:

    Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003 10:43:00 GMT
    NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003 03:43:00 PDT
    nospam Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <110820030346061721%invalid>,
    Mark Conrad <invalid> wrote:
     

    You really are too stupid to breathe! Such a parochial IDIOT!

    --
    Enough <com>
    Enough Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <110820030420054409%invalid>, nospam
    <invalid> wrote:
     
    >
    > its greenwich mean time not your own timezone.
    >
    > just look at the headers in your post:
    >
    > Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003 10:43:00 GMT
    > NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003 03:43:00 PDT[/ref]


    Whoops, you are correct.

    Someone told me that a long time ago and I forgot it.

    BTW, perhaps you also might know how that time can me manually set by
    the user.

    I tried it with a low level disk editor, and naturally the time
    _appeared_ to be set to the time I specified after "writing" the new
    time to disk with the disk editor - - - but of course when I rebooted
    the computer, something inside said "aha - that guy has 'modified' my
    disk" - - - and the computer promptly changed my manually set date and
    time to the GMT time of the reboot. grrr

    Perhaps I can temporarily change my computer's clock to fool the
    computer into putting in any GMT date and time of modification that I
    desire.

    Yeah, that should work, but it seems there should be a simplier way of
    doing it.<g>

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 14:58:51 GMT,
    Mark Conrad (invalid) wrote:
     

    Why is it so important to you that the volume modified date/time be
    displayed in PDT instead of GMT?

    Also, out of curiosity, what low level disk editor did you use, and
    what did you modify?

    Bev
    --
    Bev A. Kupf
    "The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne" -- Chaucer
    Bev Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <110820030802028046%invalid>,
    Mark Conrad <invalid> wrote:
     

    When you boot the computer, things change on the disk.
     

    Yep. Of course, that'll affect lots of other things on your computer as
    well, from the timestamps on email messages that you send to the use of
    cookies in your web browser.

    -Eric

    --
    Eric Albert edu
    http://rescomp.stanford.edu/~ejalbert/
    Eric Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <110820030802028046%invalid>,
    Mark Conrad <invalid> wrote:
     
    > >
    > > its greenwich mean time not your own timezone.[/ref][/ref]

    It's now officially known as UT (Universal Time), but a lot of people
    and programs still refer to it as GMT.

     

    Don't. It's using Universal Time because that's unambiguous, and can be
    interpreted correctly even if you move the computer into another time
    zone. Trying to trick it into using a different time might have
    undesirable side effects, because other software (such as disk repair
    utilities) will still interpret the value as Universal Time.

    The real problem is with the software you're using to peek at the disk's
    modification time. If it's displaying it as a time, it SHOULD convert
    and display it as local time, or else display "UT" or "GMT" after it.
    If it doesn't, complain to whoever produced that program.

    Take the Finder, for example. If you browse your disk in "List" View,
    or use "Get Info" on a disk or file, you'll see the modification times
    displayed in local time, even though that information is stored on the
    disk as Universal Time.
    Wayne Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <mimnet.northwestern.edu>, Bev
    A. Kupf <mimnet.northwestern.edu> wrote:
     
    >
    > Why is it so important to you that the volume modified date/time be
    > displayed in PDT instead of GMT?[/ref]

    It is not important to me that the modified date/time be _displayed_
    in PDT instead of GMT.

    I am quite content to see the time displayed as GMT (UTC)

    On the other hand, I would like the option of changing that time for
    special purposes, if any.

    Say for example, to get two "dd" backups of my OS X drive to more
    closely match each other, similar to 2 simultaneous RAID backups.

    I would like to be able to set the modification time of two backups to
    the same identical time, right down to the hundredths of a second.

     

    Symantec's "Disk Editor +" version 6.0 (2000 AD) - included as part of
    "Norton Utilities" package.

    Booting from OS9, the editor is used to modify all sectors of an OS X
    partition on another disk, including such 'non-partition' and
    'non-file' sectors as the Driver Descriptor Map of the disk.

    For example, just to amuse myself, I inserted the string ALI BABA (hex
    41 4C 49 20 42 41 42 41) into bytes 485 thru 492 of absolute sector one
    of the physical disk.

    This string of characters was inserted in an unused free-space area of
    the main Partition Map for the disk, therefore does no harm whatever.

    The string survives all ordinary actions, such as erasing the OS X
    partition. The string will not survive a re-partition, of course.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Definite Geek Question, Strange Apple "Bug"

    In article <stanford.edu>, Eric
    Albert <edu> wrote:
     
    >
    > When you boot the computer, things change on the disk.[/ref]

    Well, yes and no.

    I can reboot the computer until hell freezes over, and not detect any
    changes.

    However, if I use a low-level disk editor, _then_ reboot, I notice
    changes.


    I think the key to resolving the problem is to boot from a different
    OS-X disk, then make changes with a low-level editor, then
    _immediately_ create a dd backup _before_ rebooting.

    That way, the dd backup should retain the changes made by the editor.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

Similar Threads

  1. SMTP: "to" or/and "recipient" question.
    By Serguei.Goumeniouk@cibc.ca in forum PERL Modules
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: November 11th, 06:31 PM
  2. Download-Script: strange "[1]." in Filename
    By Kornelius Finkenbein in forum PHP Development
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: November 17th, 02:02 PM
  3. Question about "Public Sub" vs "Private Sub" vs "Sub"
    By michaaal in forum ASP Database
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: October 18th, 07:15 PM
  4. strange error "Unsuccessful stat on filename "
    By Michael P. Broida in forum PERL Miscellaneous
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: August 16th, 03:40 AM
  5. "Next Message" In Apple's Mail.app
    By Tim Beckwith in forum Mac Networking
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 21st, 05:12 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139