Professional Web Applications Themes

Describing ASP.NET - Macromedia Dreamweaver

A client of mine just asked me to explain the difference between ASP and ASP.NET. I have managed his pages for 2 years now, they were originally in bland HTML, progressed to dynamic ASP with databases, and now he is thinking of upgrading to ASP.NET. Of course, i have no problem with this, but he wants to know what ASP.NET is. Anyone have any ideas what to tell him? Jordan...

  1. #1

    Default Describing ASP.NET

    A client of mine just asked me to explain the difference between ASP and
    ASP.NET. I have managed his pages for 2 years now, they were originally in
    bland HTML, progressed to dynamic ASP with databases, and now he is thinking
    of upgrading to ASP.NET. Of course, i have no problem with this, but he
    wants to know what ASP.NET is. Anyone have any ideas what to tell him?
    Jordan


    Jordan Marton Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Describing ASP.NET

    A good place to start is this page:

    [url]http://www.asp.net/whitepaper/whyaspnet.aspx?tabindex=0&tabid=1[/url]

    Many will say it's just MS marketing hype and it is, but it also happens to
    be accurate :)

    Once you get into ASP.NET you will never look back, it makes ASP look
    primitive in comparison.

    --
    Kevin Marshall
    WebXeL.com Ltd
    [url]http://www.webxel.com[/url]

    ASP.NET Dreamweaver Extensions
    [url]http://www.webxel-dw.co.uk[/url]



    "Jordan Marton" <JMartonHAHAmarketaxess.com> wrote in message
    news:bf33bv$vs$1forums.macromedia.com...
    > A client of mine just asked me to explain the difference between ASP and
    > ASP.NET. I have managed his pages for 2 years now, they were originally in
    > bland HTML, progressed to dynamic ASP with databases, and now he is
    thinking
    > of upgrading to ASP.NET. Of course, i have no problem with this, but he
    > wants to know what ASP.NET is. Anyone have any ideas what to tell him?
    > Jordan
    >
    >

    Kevin Marshall Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Describing ASP.NET

    > Once you get into ASP.NET you will never look back, it makes ASP look
    > primitive in comparison.
    Definetly...and for that matter once you get into C# you'll never do
    VB6/VB.NET/VBScript again.

    Anyways, what type of site is it? Theres alot of features that the .NET
    Framework brings with it (ASP.NET is the web portion of the Framework, as
    WinForms is the desktop application portion - they are both unified and
    equal because of the Framework). For one, exchange of information between
    application is extremely through web services, example:

    Suppose your market is real estate companies, offering them a web based
    interface to manage property listings and display to clients. Through your
    genious and planning you knew all along that eventually these companies
    would have the need to share infomation between each other - i.e CompanyA
    Real Estate has their database of listings, CompanyB has their database of
    listings. If a client to CompanyB wants a property from CompanyA they have
    to go to CompanyA and drop CompanyB. But if CompanyA allows CompanyB to view
    its listings...then CompanyB has become a referrer to CompanyA. The real
    estate industry has MLS, but you have to leave the company's site in order
    to access it's search features. Through your .NET designed system, a client
    can view listings on CompanyB's site, with no knowledge that the listings
    are coming from different databases - data provided through web services.
    Web Services is literally a plug and play model - the web service developer
    provides the API, the client developer accesses data through that API. The
    service provider can charge for use of the service (i.e CompanyA can charge
    per-month for CompanyB's usage of the service).

    Since .NET applications (ASP.NET, WinForms, MobileForms) run on the .NET
    Framework, there is that commonality among them. They all share and utilize
    the same assemblies provided by the Framework. Applications developed with
    the framework are themselves assemblies (unless using in-line scripting as
    in traditional ASP). Since they are assemblies, they can be used by other
    ..NET applications. So reuse of application logic is a big benefit.

    Maybe these thoughts are a bit on the techical side of the topic, but those
    are my two main factors, with the third being able to develop on object
    oriented models.

    --
    Ron


    Ron Guest

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139