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Difference between MySQL and MS Access - MySQL

Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can make fast changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view. Does MySQL install via my web's FTP the same way? Or is it on a remote server like MS SQL? (I'm not that concerned with user bandwidth, it's a restricted intranet.)...

  1. #1

    Default Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can make fast
    changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.

    Does MySQL install via my web's FTP the same way? Or is it on a remote server like MS
    SQL?

    (I'm not that concerned with user bandwidth, it's a restricted intranet.)



    Victor Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access



    Gary L. Burnore wrote:
    > On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 17:02:22 -0500, "Victor" <VicMoore028>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can make fast
    >>changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.
    >
    >
    > You'll have to explain what you mean by "in by web FTP". FTP is a
    > protocal. Not a location.
    >
    >
    I'll bet his using the ftp server capabilities in IE and in IIS to upload files and he doesn't have direct access to the web server.
    With Access if the odbc driver is setup, then just drop the database file in place and it will work. No installation of executables.
    If that's the case, then no it won't work the same. While it can run on the same machine and has a local API along with odbc and
    other methods of access, it needs to be installed like any other application.

    Just a guess however.

    >
    >
    >>Does MySQL install via my web's FTP the same way? Or is it on a remote server like MS
    >>SQL?
    >
    >
    > See above.
    >
    > If you mean "Can I run on the same server as my webserver and can that
    > be windows?", Yes.
    >
    >
    >>(I'm not that concerned with user bandwidth, it's a restricted intranet.)
    >
    >
    Dennis Willson Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    Comments inline.

    "Michael Vilain" <vilainspamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:vilain-099A4A.16253108112005comcast.dca.giganews.com...
    > In article <VvSdndcmyrwTvezenZ2dnUVZ_tadnZ2dcomcast.com>,
    > "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote:
    >
    >> Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can
    >> make fast
    >> changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.
    >>
    >> Does MySQL install via my web's FTP the same way? Or is it on a remote
    >> server
    >> like MS
    >> SQL?
    >>
    >> (I'm not that concerned with user bandwidth, it's a restricted intranet.)
    >
    > Not sure what you're asking as you're not to clear in your request. If
    > you mean "Can I update or manage a database remotely?", the answer is
    > yes. There's phpMyAdmin, a web-base MySQL administration tool:
    >
    > [url]http://www.phpmyadmin.net/home_page/[/url]
    >
    > Since you have to pay for MS Access
    True... (Well, mostly. There are "evaluation" versions available. :) )
    > and it only runs on Windows locally
    > on your desktop,
    False.
    This must be split into 2 categories:
    1 - MS Access as a front-end tool can be used over various remote desktop
    technologies. It can and does connect easily to almost every type of
    database out there.
    2 - MS JET database (which is what the poster appears to refer to) can be
    set up as a backend database on a web server interface. It isn't that much
    harder or different than any other method of database deployment. It
    actually runs quite clean when the DB resides on the web server.
    > how would you run it as the backend database for a web
    > site?
    Like anything else, if you set up your server properly, it will work just
    fine.
    > MySQL, php, and Apache can do this for free.
    False... well that depends really on your MySQL deployment and use scenario.
    If the service is free and you stand to gain nothing from it's
    implementation, and meet some other criteria then it seems to be generally
    understood that it is free. Other wise you must purchase a license.

    Opensource != Freeware: Read_the_license
    > --
    > DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...
    Personally, if the implementation is small, and you have a lot of control
    over the web server, MS JET will work just fine as a database. If it starts
    to amass a lot of data and users, then it is time to move up to a full
    server based DB that can handle concurrent calls and faster response rates.

    I think MySQL would be a good choice (irregardless of licensing needs).

    However, the poster is not clear about how his database is interfaced or
    used with his web site. It all depends on the needs of the implementation.

    ~ Duane Phillips.


    Duane Phillips Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access


    "Dennis Willson" <giganewstaz-mania.com> wrote in message
    news:mZCdnbvyGN0z0OzenZ2dnUVZ_sGdnZ2dbaytsp.com.. .
    >
    >
    > Gary L. Burnore wrote:
    > > On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 17:02:22 -0500, "Victor" <VicMoore028>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can make fast
    > >>changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.
    > >
    > >
    > > You'll have to explain what you mean by "in by web FTP". FTP is a
    > > protocal. Not a location.
    > >
    > >
    > I'll bet his using the ftp server capabilities in IE and in IIS to upload files and he
    doesn't have direct access to the web server.
    > With Access if the odbc driver is setup, then just drop the database file in place and
    it will work. No installation of executables.

    I have access to a shared server using my FTP Client (FTP Surfer). I can just
    drag-and-drop mydb.mdb into a subdir on my shared web, and - voila! - can access it from
    my pages after setting up the driver.

    The nice thing about it is, for FAST changes and mods, I can just double-click mydb.mdb
    and it opens in Access. I can quickly add columns & change data if I wanted.

    Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to view & modify
    the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the database.


    Can I use mySQL the same was as Access is described above?



    Victor Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    > "Duane Phillips" wrote...
    :
    > However, the poster is not clear about how his database is interfaced or
    > used with his web site. It all depends on the needs of the implementation.
    Sorry.... this is used with a website, on a shared server.

    See my new post from a few minutes earlier for clarification.






    Victor Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    Victor,

    You are confusing JET with Access. They are not the same thing.
    You can use Access as a front end tool to nearly any type database.

    That includes MS SQL Server.
    That includes MySQL, Oracle, DB2, FOX Pro, CSV files, Excel sheets, etc.

    It does not matter where DB server is, just so long as you can access it.
    The rest is just details.

    Your statement is very telling:
    "Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to
    view & modify the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the
    database."

    It appears you do not know the joy (and and sometimes the pain) of server
    class DB systems. Once your user count and concurrent transactions hit a
    certain level, JET is no longer an viable option.

    But you still have not described anything about your DB needs.

    ~ Duane Phillips.

    "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote in message
    news:J_6dnaCvZMdmxu_eRVn-tAcomcast.com...
    >
    > "Dennis Willson" <giganewstaz-mania.com> wrote in message
    > news:mZCdnbvyGN0z0OzenZ2dnUVZ_sGdnZ2dbaytsp.com.. .
    >>
    >>
    >> Gary L. Burnore wrote:
    >> > On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 17:02:22 -0500, "Victor" <VicMoore028>
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >>Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I
    >> >>can make fast
    >> >>changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > You'll have to explain what you mean by "in by web FTP". FTP is a
    >> > protocal. Not a location.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> I'll bet his using the ftp server capabilities in IE and in IIS to upload
    >> files and he
    > doesn't have direct access to the web server.
    >> With Access if the odbc driver is setup, then just drop the database file
    >> in place and
    > it will work. No installation of executables.
    >
    > I have access to a shared server using my FTP Client (FTP Surfer). I can
    > just
    > drag-and-drop mydb.mdb into a subdir on my shared web, and - voila! - can
    > access it from
    > my pages after setting up the driver.
    >
    > The nice thing about it is, for FAST changes and mods, I can just
    > double-click mydb.mdb
    > and it opens in Access. I can quickly add columns & change data if I
    > wanted.
    >
    > Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to
    > view & modify
    > the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the database.
    >
    >
    > Can I use mySQL the same was as Access is described above?
    >
    >
    >

    Duane Phillips Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    MySQL does not exactly work like Access... It can run on the same server, it doesn't have run on a separate server. There are plenty
    of tools (some free, some not) for modifying the database and/or data locally or remotely. If your application doesn't do lots of
    updates/deletes and/or inserts, then Access may be just fine. However if you do lots of updates or database changes and the dataset
    is going to get any size at all, then Access is going to become problematic. You can't run maintainace tasks on Access while it's
    running, while you can run most routine stuff on MySQL live. I do it with a timed job to be sure the database tables and indexes are
    all in good shape and running at peak performance.

    Actually your not directly accessing the databases, your accessing them through the Access program. MySQL (as with most databases)
    have tools that allow you to access the database tables and data via a GUI instead of issuing SQL commands just like Access.

    You DO however have to get MySQL installed on the server before you can use it. It requires a program install to get the MySQL
    service going, then the ODBC driver installed before you can use it.

    Victor wrote:
    > "Dennis Willson" <giganewstaz-mania.com> wrote in message
    > news:mZCdnbvyGN0z0OzenZ2dnUVZ_sGdnZ2dbaytsp.com.. .
    >
    >>
    >>Gary L. Burnore wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 17:02:22 -0500, "Victor" <VicMoore028>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can make fast
    >>>>changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>You'll have to explain what you mean by "in by web FTP". FTP is a
    >>>protocal. Not a location.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>I'll bet his using the ftp server capabilities in IE and in IIS to upload files and he
    >
    > doesn't have direct access to the web server.
    >
    >>With Access if the odbc driver is setup, then just drop the database file in place and
    >
    > it will work. No installation of executables.
    >
    > I have access to a shared server using my FTP Client (FTP Surfer). I can just
    > drag-and-drop mydb.mdb into a subdir on my shared web, and - voila! - can access it from
    > my pages after setting up the driver.
    >
    > The nice thing about it is, for FAST changes and mods, I can just double-click mydb.mdb
    > and it opens in Access. I can quickly add columns & change data if I wanted.
    >
    > Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to view & modify
    > the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the database.
    >
    >
    > Can I use mySQL the same was as Access is described above?
    >
    >
    >
    Dennis Willson Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    The actual structure for MySQL myisam is that a database is a directory, a table is a file and the indexes for a table are a file.
    Once MySQL has been properly installed, you can create the appropreate directory and then copy the files in and restart MySQL and
    the have the databases recoqnized (I have actually done this) and you can even do this between Linux and Windows (I have actually
    done this). For InnoDB all tables go in a single file.

    No, Access does not support any of the stored procedures, triggers, transactions, etc... the way the Access Jet works is to lock
    users out of the DATABASE when another user is accessing it. On a web application where the webserver user is the one doing the
    access, then it doesn't appear to Access as multi-user, so the application has to take some care that concurrent web users don't
    cause a database inconsistancy. On MySQL myisam does table level locking and InnoDB does row level locking.

    Michael Vilain wrote:
    > In article <J_6dnaCvZMdmxu_eRVn-tAcomcast.com>,
    > "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>"Dennis Willson" <giganewstaz-mania.com> wrote in message
    >>news:mZCdnbvyGN0z0OzenZ2dnUVZ_sGdnZ2dbaytsp.com ...
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Gary L. Burnore wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 17:02:22 -0500, "Victor" <VicMoore028>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can
    >>>>>make fast
    >>>>>changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>You'll have to explain what you mean by "in by web FTP". FTP is a
    >>>>protocal. Not a location.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>I'll bet his using the ftp server capabilities in IE and in IIS to upload
    >>>files and he
    >>
    >>doesn't have direct access to the web server.
    >>
    >>>With Access if the odbc driver is setup, then just drop the database file
    >>>in place and
    >>
    >>it will work. No installation of executables.
    >>
    >>I have access to a shared server using my FTP Client (FTP Surfer). I can just
    >>drag-and-drop mydb.mdb into a subdir on my shared web, and - voila! - can
    >>access it from
    >>my pages after setting up the driver.
    >>
    >>The nice thing about it is, for FAST changes and mods, I can just
    >>double-click mydb.mdb
    >>and it opens in Access. I can quickly add columns & change data if I wanted.
    >>
    >>Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to view
    >>& modify
    >>the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the database.
    >>
    >>
    >>Can I use mySQL the same was as Access is described above?
    >
    >
    > Ah. Much clearer. Since MySQL isn't a single data file, but a series
    > of files and a server process that handles the SQL queries, my guess
    > would be no. Leastways, it's a bunch of files on my MacOS X box but
    > your shared server may implement the database differently.
    >
    > If you've used or managed an Oracle database, the concept of the
    > tablespace where the data is stored and instance where the code and
    > structures that define the database manager are used to describe a DBMS
    > environment. A single-file database as you've described isn't the same
    > thing at all, even if there are multiple tables within that file.
    >
    > With MySQL 5.0, more true DBMS features are being implemented,
    > transactions and stored procedures--to name a few. Does MS Access JET
    > implement these?
    >
    Dennis Willson Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access


    "Duane Phillips" <askmeaskme.askme> wrote in message
    news:-rqdnfP01JFM9u_eRVn-rwgiganews.com...
    > Victor,
    >
    > You are confusing JET with Access. They are not the same thing.
    > You can use Access as a front end tool to nearly any type database.
    >
    > That includes MS SQL Server.
    > That includes MySQL, Oracle, DB2, FOX Pro, CSV files, Excel sheets, etc.
    >
    > It does not matter where DB server is, just so long as you can access it.
    > The rest is just details.
    >
    > Your statement is very telling:
    > "Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to
    > view & modify the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the
    > database."
    >
    > It appears you do not know the joy (and and sometimes the pain) of server
    > class DB systems. Once your user count and concurrent transactions hit a
    > certain level, JET is no longer an viable option.
    I understand this, and I've heard all about how JET can't handle high volume
    transactions, but in reality, even with 230,000 monthly visitors I've had absolutely no
    problems. If I ever do have problems, I'll just cache the database calls & I'm good to
    go.
    >
    > But you still have not described anything about your DB needs.
    I've already described what I need. My main need is TIME. I want to save TIME. With JET,
    with an Access database *directly* accessible on my shared server via FTP I can view &
    modify the database instantly. That's what I want. That is my main need. The technical
    details I can more than handle.





    Victor Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access


    "Dennis Willson" <giganewstaz-mania.com> wrote in message
    news:KOSdnaH7JMCAHO_eRVn-jQbaytsp.com...
    > The actual structure for MySQL myisam is that a database is a directory, a table is a
    file and the indexes for a table are a file.
    > Once MySQL has been properly installed, you can create the appropreate directory and
    then copy the files in and restart MySQL and
    > the have the databases recoqnized (I have actually done this) and you can even do this
    between Linux and Windows (I have actually
    > done this). For InnoDB all tables go in a single file.
    >
    > No, Access does not support any of the stored procedures, triggers, transactions,
    etc... the way the Access Jet works is to lock
    > users out of the DATABASE when another user is accessing it. On a web application
    where the webserver user is the one doing the
    > access, then it doesn't appear to Access as multi-user, so the application has to take
    some care that concurrent web users don't
    > cause a database inconsistancy. On MySQL myisam does table level locking and InnoDB
    does row level locking.

    Thanks!



    Victor Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access


    "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote in message
    news:MPSdnZ6uONODE-_enZ2dnUVZ_t2dnZ2dcomcast.com...
    >
    >>
    >> But you still have not described anything about your DB needs.
    >
    > I've already described what I need. My main need is TIME. I want to save
    > TIME. With JET,
    > with an Access database *directly* accessible on my shared server via FTP
    > I can view &
    > modify the database instantly. That's what I want. That is my main need.
    > The technical
    > details I can more than handle.
    >
    <snipped a bunch for brevity>

    Once again, for clarity:
    JET is a database.
    Access is a GUI (not a database).
    YES, you can view and modify server-based DBMS from your desktop, without
    having to directly type the SQL commands yourself. In fact you can use
    ACCESS to do it, provided you have the rights to set up the path and
    security on the server.

    MySQL, in particular, also has some web based GUIs that have been developed
    (like PHP MyAdmin). But you can still use Access as your front end if you so
    desire.

    230K hits is not many, depending on the application. Yes, you stated you use
    it on a web server. That was in your first post. But the scope of
    implementation was not.

    So, back to your original question:

    "Nice thing about MS Access is it can be installed in my web FTP and I can
    make fast
    changes to the database by double-clicking in FTP view.

    Does MySQL install via my web's FTP the same way? Or is it on a remote
    server like MS
    SQL?

    (I'm not that concerned with user bandwidth, it's a restricted intranet.)"

    If accessing JET via FTP is what you like, stick with it. But it isn't
    easier. The bigger your file gets, the longer it takes to port over for
    changes and back again. Whereas a server based system can be accessed with a
    variety of GUI's directly (such as Access), without having to port the file
    over.

    No, MySQL does not "install" via FTP (at least not easily). But it doesn't
    need to. It is your front end tools understanding that is tripping you up.

    HTH.

    ~ Duane Phillips.


    Duane Phillips Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access


    "Duane Phillips" <askmeaskme.askme> wrote in message
    news:JJCdnTyC_eYuNu_enZ2dnUVZ_sqdnZ2dgiganews.com ...
    >
    > "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote in message
    > news:MPSdnZ6uONODE-_enZ2dnUVZ_t2dnZ2dcomcast.com...
    > >
    > >>
    > >> But you still have not described anything about your DB needs.
    > >
    > > I've already described what I need. My main need is TIME. I want to save
    > > TIME. With JET,
    > > with an Access database *directly* accessible on my shared server via FTP
    > > I can view &
    > > modify the database instantly. That's what I want. That is my main need.
    > > The technical
    > > details I can more than handle.
    > >
    > <snipped a bunch for brevity>
    >
    > Once again, for clarity:
    > JET is a database.
    I use the JET connectivity to get to my database.
    > Access is a GUI (not a database).
    Access is a database. It can be used on a deaktop or a webserver. JET is the type of
    connection. I realize that you'd rather turn this into an argument about semantics, but
    to me this is about functionality.
    > MySQL, in particular, also has some web based GUIs that have been developed
    > (like PHP MyAdmin). But you can still use Access as your front end if you so
    > desire.
    I'm beginning to realize here that MySQL is incapable of fitting my needs.

    >
    > 230K hits is not many, depending on the application. Yes, you stated you use
    > it on a web server. That was in your first post. But the scope of
    > implementation was not.
    I never said it was 230K *hits* - it's "230,000 monthly visitors". Hits is about
    3Million hits per month.



    Victor Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote in message
    news:5KCdnQ4sDMv2Ee7eRVn-rQcomcast.com...
    >
    > "Duane Phillips" <askmeaskme.askme> wrote in message
    > news:JJCdnTyC_eYuNu_enZ2dnUVZ_sqdnZ2dgiganews.com ...
    >>
    >> "Victor" <VicMoore028> wrote in message
    >> news:MPSdnZ6uONODE-_enZ2dnUVZ_t2dnZ2dcomcast.com...
    >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> But you still have not described anything about your DB needs.
    >> >
    >> > I've already described what I need. My main need is TIME. I want to
    >> > save
    >> > TIME. With JET,
    >> > with an Access database *directly* accessible on my shared server via
    >> > FTP
    >> > I can view &
    >> > modify the database instantly. That's what I want. That is my main
    >> > need.
    >> > The technical
    >> > details I can more than handle.
    >> >
    >> <snipped a bunch for brevity>
    >>
    >> Once again, for clarity:
    >> JET is a database.
    >
    > I use the JET connectivity to get to my database.
    >
    >> Access is a GUI (not a database).
    >
    > Access is a database. It can be used on a deaktop or a webserver. JET is
    > the type of
    > connection. I realize that you'd rather turn this into an argument about
    > semantics, but
    > to me this is about functionality.
    >
    >> MySQL, in particular, also has some web based GUIs that have been
    >> developed
    >> (like PHP MyAdmin). But you can still use Access as your front end if you
    >> so
    >> desire.
    >
    > I'm beginning to realize here that MySQL is incapable of fitting my needs.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> 230K hits is not many, depending on the application. Yes, you stated you
    >> use
    >> it on a web server. That was in your first post. But the scope of
    >> implementation was not.
    >
    > I never said it was 230K *hits* - it's "230,000 monthly visitors". Hits is
    > about
    > 3Million hits per month.
    >
    Not an argument my friend. You have other resources to verify the facts.
    (Try comp.databases.ms-access for instance... try telling them that Access
    is a database and JET is merely the connection type). It is not semantics.
    You are using a JET driver because you are connecting to a JET database...
    just like you would use a MS SQL Server driver to connect to a MS SQL Server
    database, and a MySQL driver to connect to a MySQL database. MS JET is the
    default database for MS Access. Using linked tables you can connect to
    Access any type of database. Judging by your statements here, you will
    remain ignorant of the facts, for you do not comprehend it. It would seem
    you have only begun to scratch the surface of the capabilities of MS Access.

    Functionally, you are dragging your entire database accross the wire every
    time you want to edit it, when you could be editing your data where it
    sits... still using a GUI (like Access). Not only that, you stated this
    thing was on a private intranet... so, using Access is even easier to
    implement _regardless_ of your selected type of backend. Where you _lose_
    with Access, is in query speed. Regardless of the database used, with linked
    tables Access drags the entire dataset(s) involved to local machine to
    perform it's queries. With a server-side database, the queries are sent to
    the server and processed _on_the_server_, and only the result set is sent
    over the wire, saving tremendous resources on both server, network, and
    local ram/cache. But as you stated at first:

    "(I'm not that concerned with user bandwidth, it's a restricted intranet.)"

    ~ Duane Phillips.


    Duane Phillips Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Difference between MySQL and MS Access

    Victor wrote:
    > Now, compared to MS SQL, which is on a seperate server. The only way to
    > view & modify the database is by SQL commands - I can't directly view the
    > database.
    >
    >
    > Can I use mySQL the same was as Access is described above?

    Victor,
    You're confusing the two. mysql is not a file-based database like Access.
    You "access" (pardon the pun) the mysql database through a mysql server,
    Oh, and yes, I get the part about simply being able to upload a file to a
    certain spot, and "voila", however it really isn't that much harder than
    accessing a mysql server, as long as you're making the changes at one
    place. Also, the problem is is that (in my not so humble experience)
    access file based databases tend to corrupt quite easily. I know that's
    hard to imagine, a Microsoft product being corrupt...
    John Meyer Guest

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