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dual booting gentoo and debian via grub question - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

Hello, I want to install gentoo and debian on my computer. This seems much harder than I originally anticipated. I have the following questions: Can they use the same swap partition or do I require two separate swap partitions? What should I put in my boot partitions? By this I mean, does the kernel actualy go into the boot partition or does it go on the various root partitions of debian and gentoo. Further to this, does it matter - can I just tell grub that both debian and gentoo linux kernels are in boot or inside their respective root ...

  1. #1

    Default dual booting gentoo and debian via grub question

    Hello,

    I want to install gentoo and debian on my computer. This seems much
    harder than I originally anticipated. I have the following questions:

    Can they use the same swap partition or do I require two separate swap
    partitions? What should I put in my boot partitions? By this I mean,
    does the kernel actualy go into the boot partition or does it go on
    the various root partitions of debian and gentoo. Further to this,
    does it matter - can I just tell grub that both debian and gentoo
    linux kernels are in boot or inside their respective root directories?
    If the kernel for each should go in boot (is this a best practise?)
    then how big should the boot partition be made to be?

    Any assistance is greatly appreciated, thanks,

    Rob
    Rob Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: dual booting gentoo and debian via grub question

    On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 17:58:07 -0700, Rob Baxter wrote:
     
    In general terms, here is one possible partition idea:
    s : swap
    b : boot (50+/- Meg)
    g : gentoo
    d : debian

    So when when gentoo is booted, these partitions are mounted:
    s : swap
    b : boot
    g : root
    d : not mounted by default

    And when debian is booted:
    s : swap
    b : boot
    g : not mounted by default
    d : root

    1. Both gentoo and debian can use the same swap partition. Use /etc/fstab
    to declare swap; see below.

    2. Debian and Gentoo should have there own separate root file system (on
    their respective partitions.)

    3. A boot partition is probably a good idea in this case, although not
    strictly necessary. It simplifies the settings in each system's
    /etc/fstab. Whether or not it is on a separate partition, /boot should
    contain the kernels which you will use. Also, the directory boot/grub
    should exist and have "stage files" and menu.lst. Consult grub docs.

    4. Setup /boot/grub/menu.lst to reference kernels and menu options.
    Consult grub docs.

    5. Run grub shell to install the grub loader. Consult grub docs.

    6. Fix each system's /etc/fstab to declare the mount points.
    Assuming debian is on partition "d" and gentoo is on partition "g, verify
    (partition d)/etc/fstab is appropriate for debian when partition d is
    mounted as root; and verify (partition g)/etc/fstab is appropriate for
    gentoo when partition y is mounted as root.

    7. Prepare a boot floppy for each system (so you can recover from any
    errors or failures.)

    If you have more questions, then post your chosen disk partitioning
    scheme, etc.

    --
    Douglas Mayne
    Douglas Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: dual booting gentoo and debian via grub question

    > In general terms, here is one possible partition idea: 

    Wow - excellent answer, thanks. I'll try this out tonight and post
    the results. One question: how big is the kernel when it is compiled?
    Does it vary depending on what's compiled into it by a large amount?
    I'd like to be able to test out a few different kernel configurations
    in addition to my core, or stable gentoo and debian kernels.

    Thanks again,

    Rob
    Rob Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: dual booting gentoo and debian via grub question

    On Tue, 25 Nov 2003 07:42:17 -0700, Rob Baxter wrote: [/ref]
    <snip> 
    >
    > Wow - excellent answer, thanks. I'll try this out tonight and post the
    > results. One question: how big is the kernel when it is compiled?
    > Does it vary depending on what's compiled into it by a large amount?
    > I'd like to be able to test out a few different kernel configurations in
    > addition to my core, or stable gentoo and debian kernels.
    >
    > Thanks again,
    >
    > Rob
    >[/ref]
    My suggestion to use about 50M for a boot partition gives room for several
    kernels, with room to spare. You could use 100M if you want. You probably
    have plenty of space to spare on your disk.

    A typical bzImage of a "modular" linux kernel of the 2.4 series is about a
    megabyte (750k - 1.5M). Looking at my system, the modules, which are
    dynamically loaded, are about 4M total. The modules are stored in the
    directory /lib/modules/2.4.x, where x is the release number - so they
    don't count in the space needed for the boot partition. If you were to
    make a non-modular kernel, I guess it would be about 5M with the same
    options- but I don't think this would really make sense.

    --
    Douglas Mayne
    Douglas Guest

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