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DVD Burning: ISO9660 vs. UDF - FreeBSD

I'm trying to burn a (data) DVD, to back up some older stuff, but I've hit a bit of a snafu. Everything I've read has said to use 'growisofs' (or 'mkisofs') to create an ISO9660 filesystem, which then gets burned to the disc. Which is fine; I can do that, and it works. But one of the files I need to burn is just over 3GB, and ISO9660 no likey files that big. And I'm not sure it matters, but I'm using both Joliet and Rock Ridge extensions. There are a couple of ways I can work around this, but ...

  1. #1

    Default DVD Burning: ISO9660 vs. UDF

    I'm trying to burn a (data) DVD, to back up some older stuff, but I've hit a
    bit of a snafu.

    Everything I've read has said to use 'growisofs' (or 'mkisofs') to create an
    ISO9660 filesystem, which then gets burned to the disc. Which is fine; I
    can do that, and it works. But one of the files I need to burn is just over
    3GB, and ISO9660 no likey files that big. And I'm not sure it matters, but
    I'm using both Joliet and Rock Ridge extensions.

    There are a couple of ways I can work around this, but I was wondering, how
    does one burn a UDF filesystem to a DVD (or any medium, for that matter)?
    Or, how can I coax CD9660 to like files that big? (I'm near positive I
    can't.)

    Again, please Cc: me in any reply, as I'm not subscribed to -questions.

    - Damian
    Damian Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: DVD Burning: ISO9660 vs. UDF

    Thus spake Damian Gerow (org) [09/04/05 21:33]:
    : There are a couple of ways I can work around this, but I was wondering, how
    : does one burn a UDF filesystem to a DVD (or any medium, for that matter)?
    : Or, how can I coax CD9660 to like files that big? (I'm near positive I
    : can't.)

    Answering my own question: mkisofs supports '--udf' as a way to enable an
    alpha-quality pseudo-UDF filesystem.

    (I've been looking too deep. man is your friend.)
    Damian Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: DVD Burning: ISO9660 vs. UDF

    On Sat, Apr 09, 2005 at 09:48:51PM -0400, Damian Gerow wrote: 

    If you're only backing up data, this is not so important, but if you're
    backing up whole systems, you may want to consider a more pragmatic
    approach:

    The real question here is: can you read UDF from a freshly installed
    system without having to install additional programs, and without
    having to restore from that very UDF backup? Or, asked differently:
    can you actually READ your UDF backups when booting from the fixit CD?

    When doing backups, it's always best to be really conservative about
    the formats you use.

    If your file is >1GB, you could always split(1) it into 1GB chunks
    before running growisofs (be sure to doent it in some way though,
    e.g. fileN.1o4, fileN.2o4, fileN.3o4, fileN.4o4).

    Another way is to tell your backup utility to create chunks <1GB.
    dump(8) can do this for you. gtar perhaps too (--tape-length).

    Cheers,
    -cpghost.

    --
    Cordula's Web. http://www.cordula.ws/
    cpghost@cordula.ws Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: DVD Burning: ISO9660 vs. UDF

    Thus spake ws (ws) [09/04/05 23:34]:
    : If you're only backing up data, this is not so important, but if you're
    : backing up whole systems, you may want to consider a more pragmatic
    : approach:

    Of course. Were I backing up a whole system, chances are, I'd not be
    dealing with 3GB tarballs; in that case, ISO9660 should work just fine.

    : The real question here is: can you read UDF from a freshly installed
    : system without having to install additional programs, and without
    : having to restore from that very UDF backup? Or, asked differently:
    : can you actually READ your UDF backups when booting from the fixit CD?
    :
    : When doing backups, it's always best to be really conservative about
    : the formats you use.
    :
    : If your file is >1GB, you could always split(1) it into 1GB chunks
    : before running growisofs (be sure to doent it in some way though,
    : e.g. fileN.1o4, fileN.2o4, fileN.3o4, fileN.4o4).

    split is a pretty handy utility. It's saved me more than once, and I /was/
    considering using it again here. The question, in this case, was a little
    more academic: is it /possible/? If so, how? I didn't want to address the
    "Is it a good idea?" aspect of my approach.

    Luckily, in my case, the system I'm backing up is a, "Oh, we just got
    hacked, here's a few dumps for the entire system. Now we need to flatten
    and re-install."

    I'm backing up more for just-in-case purposes; I will never, ever be
    'required' to pull the data from this backup. I may, one day down the road,
    be curious as to something that was on the system, but it's been about six
    months since the re-install, so the likelihood of me needing the data again
    is about as close to zero as you can get. So, again, this was more of a
    can-I-do-this question than a should-I-do-this question.

    But thanks for the pointers, anyhow: I had never used dump's tape length
    option (now, does dump for ext3 handle it as well...).

    - Damian
    Damian Guest

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