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Excessive spam - Mac Networking

Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with the Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting worse. There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could, supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but have lost the details. Can any kind soul remind me of the URL ...

  1. #1

    Default Excessive spam

    Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with the
    Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam
    adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting
    worse.
    There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but have
    lost the details.
    Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?

    Kind regards,
    Devi Jankowicz

    Devi Jankowicz Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    In article
    <0001HW.BB849498001C1575F0080600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>, Devi
    Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    > Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with the
    > Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam
    > adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting
    > worse.
    > There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    > Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    > supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    > the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but have
    > lost the details.
    > Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?
    Forget it. I wouldn't trust any of them.

    Options are,

    1. Server side filter.
    2. Change your email address.
    3. Live with it and filter on client side.
    Whytoi Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    In article
    <0001HW.BB849498001C1575F0080600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>,
    Devi Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    > Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?
    No such thing in this world. That'd only work for spammers who cared
    about the people on their lists. Since that's a null set, all you'd be
    doing is giving them your information again.

    --
    Today, on Paper-view: Pulp Fiction!
    Howard S Shubs Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    Devi Jankowicz wrote:
    > There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    > Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    > supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    > the marketers' mailing lists.
    It would be like sending letters to all the local burglars
    with your address and times you're absent, then asking them
    not to steal your jewellery.
    George Williams Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    In article
    <0001HW.BB849498001C1575F0080600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>,
    Devi Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    > Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with the
    > Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam
    > adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting
    > worse.
    > There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    > Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    > supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    > the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but have
    > lost the details.
    > Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?
    If you actually want to do more than changing your address...

    Start, I think, by looking through
    [url]http://www.symantec.com/legal/privacy.html[/url]

    Near the bottom is a means of updating your information...update the
    email address to a throw-away address you create for the purpose.

    See if the flood to your regular address abates (it won't go away). It
    will take a while...these are computers, so they're slow. ;-)

    If the flood doesn't abate, try the addresses at the very bottom of the
    page noted above. Look up Symantec in Standard & Poors or whereever,
    and address your (calmly written, with substanting facts) paper letter
    to the CEO. CC: the message to a paper mail contact you find within
    Trust-e by following the link at the top (CC it by email if necessary).

    I use a different and trackable address for every vendor I register a
    product with. I haven't received any outpouring of email from my
    registration of Windows Norton SystemWorks (I did every available
    opt-out, as usual). For problem addresses, I have my ISP silently dump
    any mail to the address on the floor...a venerable maker of PDAs can no
    longer send me mail at my registered address as a result of the handy
    tracking.

    (Note...one of the drop-on-the-floor addresses is the email address
    appearing in this message.)

    --John

    --
    Email to above address discarded by provider's server. Don't bother sending.
    John Baxter Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 22:20:36 +0100, James Meiss wrote
    (in message <jdm-F22A88.15203610092003peabody.colorado.edu>):
    > In article
    > <0001HW.BB849498001C1575F0080600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>,
    > Devi Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with
    >> the
    >> Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam
    >> adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting
    >> worse.
    >> There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    >> Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    >> supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    >> the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but
    >> have
    >> lost the details.
    >> Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?
    >>
    >> Kind regards,
    >> Devi Jankowicz
    >>
    >
    > The Direct Marketing association claims to do this. No idea if it
    > works...I actually tried it (against my better judgement), but haven't
    > noticed any difference. Of course most spam is from sbags who would
    > ignore this list.
    >
    > See <http://www.dmaconsumers.org/consumers/optoutform_emps.shtml>
    >
    >
    Dear James,
    Many thanks: this is the address I had in mind.
    Kind regards,
    Devi

    Devi Jankowicz Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 22:47:34 +0100, John Baxter wrote
    (in message <news.collectivize-B8B318.14473310092003corp.supernews.com>):
    > In article
    > <0001HW.BB849498001C1575F0080600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>,
    > Devi Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with
    >> the
    >> Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam
    >> adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting
    >> worse.
    >> There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    >> Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    >> supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    >> the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but
    >> have
    >> lost the details.
    >> Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?
    >
    > If you actually want to do more than changing your address...
    >
    > Start, I think, by looking through
    > [url]http://www.symantec.com/legal/privacy.html[/url]
    >
    > Near the bottom is a means of updating your information...update the
    <snip>
    > --John
    >
    >
    Thanks you for taking the time, John; I shall certainly try this.

    Kind regards,
    Devi

    Devi Jankowicz Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Excessive spam

    In article
    <0001HW.BB8567F20009124DF0101600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>,
    Devi Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 22:47:34 +0100, John Baxter wrote
    > (in message <news.collectivize-B8B318.14473310092003corp.supernews.com>):
    >
    > > In article
    > > <0001HW.BB849498001C1575F0080600news.cache.cable. ntlworld.com>,
    > > Devi Jankowicz <animusntlworld.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Ever since I stupidly answered a 'free offer' advert that came along with
    > >> the
    > >> Norton Utilities registration site, I have been flooded with e-mailed spam
    > >> adverts. I use my filters, of course, but it's up to 150 a day and getting
    > >> worse.
    > >> There used to be a special-purpose service (rather like the Mailing
    > >> Preference Service for non-electronic postal services) where one could,
    > >> supposedly, enter one's details to get one's name _genuinely_ removed from
    > >> the marketers' mailing lists. I used it once and it seemed to work, but
    > >> have
    > >> lost the details.
    > >> Can any kind soul remind me of the URL please?
    > >
    > > If you actually want to do more than changing your address...
    > >
    > > Start, I think, by looking through
    > > [url]http://www.symantec.com/legal/privacy.html[/url]
    > >
    > > Near the bottom is a means of updating your information...update the
    > <snip>
    > > --John
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Thanks you for taking the time, John; I shall certainly try this.
    >
    One would expect Symantec and their "carefully selected partners" to
    honor the DMA list. One might, of course, be wrong.

    You might want to avoid trying the DMA direct to Symantec solutions at
    the same time, so you can tell which one works if the flow actually does
    reduce.

    --John

    --
    Email to above address discarded by provider's server. Don't bother sending.
    John Baxter Guest

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