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Exposure Compensation - Photography

If I have a set shuuter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct aperature reads say F9 . But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field. Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop larger aperature? Also what would my F stop be here? Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.). EEO...

  1. #1

    Default Exposure Compensation

    If I have a set shuuter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct
    aperature reads say F9 .
    But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop larger
    aperature?
    Also what would my F stop be here?
    Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).


    EEO


    Eyron Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Exposure Compensation


    "Eyron" <odd1rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:iDZWa.56671$hOa.42696news02.bloor.is.net.cab le.rogers.com...
    > If I have a set shuuter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct
    > aperature reads say F9 .
    > But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    > Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop
    larger
    > aperature?
    Yes - that is what "stop" means -
    > Also what would my F stop be here?
    I'm not sure, but you can just use either aperture or shutter priority AE
    mode and run the other up or down and find out. If you are in shutter
    priority mode, then increase shutter speed until you get the f-stop you
    desire. If you go aperture priority, just set the aperture you desire, and
    if there is enough range, the shutter speed will match.
    > Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).
    You aren't talking about exposure compensation; you are just setting normal
    exposure. There is no drawback to any set or range of exposure combinations.
    Just the effects of high vs low aperture and high vs low shutter speed.

    Gary Eickmeier



    Gary Eickmeier Guest

  3. #3

    Default exposure compensation

    The camera is in manual mode and is a Fuji S2 Pro.
    If I have a set shutter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct
    aperature reads say F9 .
    I need the shutter speed to be 1/125 sec.
    But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop larger
    aperature?
    Also what would my F stop be here?
    Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).


    EEO



    Eyron Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: exposure compensation

    If I understand you correctly, you say that you are fixing the F stop but
    that you have already fixed the shutter speed, and now you want to change
    the F stop to affect the depth of field. You would have to raise (higher
    number) the F stop to increase the depth of field, and visa versa. But
    since you have fixed the shutter speed, the exposure will not longer be
    correct. I believe this is a digital camera? If this camera gives you a
    RAW file output, then I think you can push or pull the picture +/- two stops
    (at least I can with my Canon). If you want to do more than that, I'm not
    sure. Also, if your camera does NOT give you a RAW file, then what you
    propose may not or will not work.

    "Eyron" <odd1rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:Oq%Wa.57581$hOa.18574news02.bloor.is.net.cab le.rogers.com...
    > The camera is in manual mode and is a Fuji S2 Pro.
    > If I have a set shutter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct
    > aperature reads say F9 .
    > I need the shutter speed to be 1/125 sec.
    > But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    > Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop
    larger
    > aperature?
    > Also what would my F stop be here?
    > Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).
    >
    >
    > EEO
    >
    >
    >

    Dave Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: exposure compensation

    Eyron wrote:
     

    Wrong way to do this, since your exposure will be way off.
     

    Improper exposure. You would be better off setting the ISO speed three stops
    different to force a larger aperture (smaller number). Your other option, if
    you cannot alter the ISO setting that far, would be to place a three stop ND
    filter over the front of the lens. The ND filter can get you exactly where you
    want to be, without changing the ISO setting. Those with film cameras reading
    this post can also do the same thing, and is one of the best reasons to own an
    ND filter.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    Alliance Graphique Studio
    <http://www.allgstudio.com>

    Gordon Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Exposure Compensation

    It sounds like you should only post your message once, and don't do so
    much cross posting, it is considered bad manner. Some of the groups you
    included have little to do with your digital camera.

    You should be able to change the "film speed" on your camera. Lower it
    to force a larger stop and less depth of field or raise it for more depth of
    field. ND (neutral density) filters also work and they work on digitals.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "JK" <JK9821netcape.net> wrote in message
    news:3F2C7003.FC95827Anetcape.net...
    >
    >
    > Eyron wrote:
    >
    > > If I have a set shuuter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec)
    >
    > > and the correct
    > > aperature reads say F9 .
    >
    > So the camera is in shutter priority mode, or is it in program mode?
    >
    > >
    > > But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    > > Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop
    larger
    > > aperature?
    >
    > First of all, -3 means 3 stops less exposure. In shutter priority mode,
    > this would close the aperture further, which is exactly the opposite
    > of what you want. So you neeed to to get to f3.5 or so to have much less
    > depth of field. Going with a +3 setting will give you less depth of field,
    > but your image will be 3 stops overexposed. What you really want to do
    > is set the camera in aperture priority mode, then pick around f2.8 or
    > f3.5 if you want shallow depth of field. The camera will then choose the
    > appropriate shutter speed, which in this case would be 1/1000th of
    > a second. If you have an slr, flash usually wouldn't work properly
    > at such a high shutter speed(since at high shutter speeds, the
    > shutter curtain is never fully open over the whole film frame or sensor)
    > In that case, you would want to lower the ISO rating the camera is set
    > at if there is room to do that. So if you lower the ISO rating by three
    > stops(ie from 400 ISO to 50 ISO), you can get roughly f3.5 at 1/125th
    > of a second exposure.
    >
    > >
    > > Also what would my F stop be here?
    > > Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).
    > >
    > > EEO
    >

    Joseph Meehan Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Exposure Compensation

    Just keep in mind that one 'stop' worth of exposure time is a factor of
    two, while one stop difference is a factor of about 1.4 (or 0.7), since
    exposure goes as f/stop squared. That is, going from f/5.6 to f/8 is
    one stop difference, and would take a doubling of exposure time.

    Eyron wrote:
    >
    > If I have a set shuuter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct
    > aperature reads say F9 .
    > But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    > Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop larger
    > aperature?
    > Also what would my F stop be here?
    > Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).
    >
    > EEO
    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota
    [email]staufferusfamily.net[/email]
    webpage- [url]http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer[/url]
    Don Stauffer Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: exposure compensation

    Try a ND filter, about 1.0. That will force the aperture to a larger
    setting at the specified shutter duration.

    Don

    --
    Experience is what lets you recognize
    a mistake when you make it again.


    "Gordon Moat" <net> wrote in message
    news:net... [/ref]
    larger 
    >
    > Wrong way to do this, since your exposure will be way off.

    >
    > Improper exposure. You would be better off setting the ISO speed three[/ref]
    stops 
    if 
    ND 
    you 
    reading 
    own an 



    Don Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: exposure compensation


    "Eyron" <odd1rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:Oq%Wa.57581$hOa.18574news02.bloor.is.net.cab le.rogers.com...
    > The camera is in manual mode and is a Fuji S2 Pro.
    > If I have a set shutter speed (ie sync at 1/125 sec) and the correct
    > aperature reads say F9 .
    > I need the shutter speed to be 1/125 sec.
    > But I need a lower F stop to limit depth of field.
    > Will minus 3 stops of exposure control alow this and give me a 3 stop
    larger
    > aperature?
    > Also what would my F stop be here?
    > Are there any drawback to use exposure compensation. ( ie noise etc.).
    >
    >
    Why has this been posted twice in the same group?

    Gary Eickmeier


    Gary Eickmeier Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: exposure compensation


    "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmeitampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:5NdXa.9704$On2.633100twister.tampabay.rr.com ...
    >
    > (snip)
    >
    > Why has this been posted twice in the same group?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier
    >
    >
    Uh.. he's trying to get more "exposure" for his question? ;-)

    Danny


    Danny Guest

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    Eyron Guest
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    Tesselator Guest
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  13. #13

    Default Exposure Compensation

    Hello. My camera's manual says to use the exposure compensator when
    there are very bright or very dark objects in the frame. I've also
    read that you should use a grey card. Which method is best? Or do they
    achieve the same results?
    PandaBear Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Exposure Compensation

    Yes, they're both best. The grey card isn't the be all and end all of
    exposure determination, either - at least, I don't think so. Scenes with
    extremes of contrast in one image will sometimes have to lean a little more
    one way than the other, for example, and the let the opposite extreme
    blacken or whiten. The grey card won't tell you that. Extremely dark scenes
    might have to be brought up a bit from a grey card reading, to get usable
    content, and vice versa. Using the grey card properly takes a little
    knowledge - the same light has to fall on it as on your subject. I don't
    think the standardization of grey cards is all that great, at least not the
    inexpensive ones that I've seen.

    You can use one method to check that you're "close" with the other.

    And still bracket.

    Do I take it that you're not thinking of a specific composition when you ask
    this?

    And, slide, print or digital? They'll be handled a bit differently.

    ====

    Charles T. Low
    com - remove "UN"
    www.boatdocking.com/Photos/ - gallery
    www.ctlow.ca/Photo/ - essay

    ====

    "PandaBear" <com> wrote in message
    news:google.com... 


    Charles Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Exposure Compensation

    A grey card will give you the middle of the road exposure. It would
    probably be the best for most photos. If you are shooting long
    exposures (ie. 1 second or more) then you will still want to use
    exposure compensation. If shooting with B&W film, a good rule of thumb
    is to expose for the shadows and develop for the lights. In other
    words, overexpose to bring out the details in the shadows, and
    underdevelop so the light areas are not "nout", to just be a white
    area void of detail.

    PandaBear wrote: 

    lohort@sbcglobal.net Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Exposure Compensation

    On 14 Dec 2003 09:09:23 -0800, com (PandaBear) wrote:
     


    Your best bet is to take a metered reading off your subject, be it via
    the camera's own internal meter or a hand held meter.

    Many cameras offer spot metering...which allows you simply point the
    center of your frame at your main subject, then meter...you can then
    frame the photo however it pleases you best. With some cameras you
    can walk up to a subject (say a person for instance)...take a reading
    off them and press a metering select button, then back away and shoot
    your photo with the same metered reading off the subject rather than
    the entire scene.

    Same thing holds true, say you want the sun IN the picture of a scene
    with something else. You'd need to meter off the "something else"
    without getting a reading off the sun, then include the sun in the
    image...otherwise, it'll turn out way too dark.

    Other times, like when you're shooting dark scenes...such as Xmas
    trees, you're not going to get much more than the lights in the photo
    unless you make a proper exposure off the "tree" itself, or atleast
    use a flash or some fill-in lighting to help bring out the details of
    the tree.
    Slingblade Guest

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