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file name and hostname in UNICODE - Linux / Unix Administration

Hello guys, We are modifying our application to accomodate UNICODE. Our application uses TCP/IP and file resources a lot. Please let us know if UNIX file names and hostnames can be in languages other than English and if they can be in UNICODE. Are there other UNIX system resources that we should keep in mind while making our app work with UNICODE? Please reply to ca Thank you, Alona...

  1. #1

    Default file name and hostname in UNICODE

    Hello guys,

    We are modifying our application to accomodate UNICODE. Our application
    uses TCP/IP and file resources a lot.

    Please let us know if UNIX file names and hostnames can be in languages
    other than English and if they can be in UNICODE.

    Are there other UNIX system resources that we should keep in mind while
    making our app work with UNICODE?

    Please reply to ca


    Thank you,
    Alona

    allab@sympatico.ca Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: file name and hostname in UNICODE

    In article <googlegroups.com>,
    ca wrote:
     

    I would seriously doubt it. The standard for many years has been ASCII
    characters excluding certain characters. You might be able to name a
    machine something in UNICODE, but I don't think DNS or NIS or LDAP is
    UNICODE compatible so what would be your point?

    Better stay within the standard UNIX namespace of ASCII letters, first
    must be a letter, and no punctuation.

    If this is a requirement, what systems will it interoperate with?
    Windows, UNIX, or something else? If you're in a stand-alone
    environment, you might get away with it, but the rest of the internet
    may not like it.

    --
    DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...



    Michael Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: file name and hostname in UNICODE

    ca wrote: 

    File names do not have any specific standards other
    than forbidding forward slash and null, but the
    fact that you can create files with unicode name
    does not mean you should.

    Hostnames have a more powerfull issue. DNS requires
    simple character names in A records but has no such
    requirement in CNAME records. It is possible to
    have names as simple as serial numbers for the A
    records and use CNAME records with unicode. Of
    course this sort of stunt is an abysmally bad idea:
    Every time the host name is displayed it uses the
    A record or PTR record and both must use the simple
    set. Doing it would confuse the users.

    Languages other than English does not have to be
    a unicode issue, though. Ich kann auf Deutsch
    ohne unicode screiben. Most/all languages should
    offer a transliteration method that is all
    desirable than unicode but that still works.
     

    This is the "should" issue I mentioned with filenames.
    If you end up with shell special characters, or if
    even one of the applications you use is not unicode
    compatible you're in trouble.

    So try it with files in a test environment and see
    if all of your programs handle it. Forget hostnames.
    Do them phonetically in other languages if you wish
    but stay with simple characters. En francais, non
    sedilla.

    Doug Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: file name and hostname in UNICODE

    Doug,

    We are not going to name our computers or files in other languages. We
    developed an application that must read computer names and file names.
    So far, our application has been non-UNICODE and our clients around the
    world were required to use English with our program.

    Now we want to be more user-friendly and we want our program to "speak"
    other languages. Can our UNIX clients in Italy or Germany have a
    computer name that contains national characters? Can our Russian
    clients have files containing Russian national characters? We are not
    talking about transliteration, but we want to accomodate real life
    situation.

    Regards,
    Alona

    allab@sympatico.ca Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: file name and hostname in UNICODE

    ca wrote: 

    No. The RFCs require that hostnames use a very limited
    set of characters.
     

    Yes. UNIX filenames are not restricted by those RFCs.
     

    It would be a very good idea to translate all of your
    messages and canned responses by language. Allow your
    clients to use what filenames they wish. That choice
    is not available with hostnames. Two different
    situations, two different answers.

    Doug Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: file name and hostname in UNICODE

    On 29 Sep 2005 09:02:27 -0700,
    Doug Freyburger <com> wrote:

     
    >
    > File names do not have any specific standards other
    > than forbidding forward slash and null, but the
    > fact that you can create files with unicode name
    > does not mean you should.
    >[/ref]

    When talking about UNICODE you also should think about its encoding.
    For utf-8 encoded UNICODE the kernel code can hardly tell the difference
    between that and any other 8-bit encoded character set. Utf-16, however,
    when seen as a string of 8-bit values, usualy contains too many binary
    zeroes to be valied file names as far as the kernel is concerned.

    Villy
    Villy Guest

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