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hi, when creating of files or direcotries, what are the reasons when to use filesystems or raw device?...

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  1. #1

    Default filesystem or rawdevice

    hi, when creating of files or direcotries, what are the reasons when
    to use filesystems or raw device?
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    yls177 Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: filesystem or rawdevice

    yls177 wrote:
    >
    > hi, when creating of files or direcotries, what are the reasons when
    > to use filesystems or raw device?
    Filesystems contain files or directories. Raw devices do not. If
    you wish to create a directrory inside of a raw device, a filesystem
    is the only way.

    So it has something to do with what's possible and impossible at
    that layer of the onion.
    Doug Freyburger Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: filesystem or rawdevice

    [email]dfreybur[/email] (Doug Freyburger) wrote in message news:<7960d3ee.0408091100.4376b1a4posting.google. com>...
    > yls177 wrote:
    > >
    > > hi, when creating of files or direcotries, what are the reasons when
    > > to use filesystems or raw device?
    >
    > Filesystems contain files or directories. Raw devices do not. If
    > you wish to create a directrory inside of a raw device, a filesystem
    > is the only way.
    >
    > So it has something to do with what's possible and impossible at
    > that layer of the onion.
    filesystems are a logical thing. they resides on the disks itself and
    their access is through the file system buffer cache, and they uses
    block devices.

    for raw devices, they bypasses the file system's buffer cache and
    gives you "direct" access to the device.

    i search the web and find the below
    "There are two ways to access a device (hard drive, floppy, CD-ROM,
    what
    have you). One is the standard method, which uses block devices. The
    other method for accessing these devices is via the raw device
    interface. You're accessing the same hardware, but the raw device
    bypasses the file system's buffer cache and gives you "direct" access
    to
    the device. This can be very convenient for particular purposes, but
    you need to be careful if you ever intend to mix block and raw
    accesses
    to the same device."

    1) filesystem is in the block device category?
    2) when will we decide which category(block or raw) to use?
    yls177 Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: filesystem or rawdevice

    yls177 wrote:
    > Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > > Filesystems contain files or directories. Raw devices do not. If
    > > you wish to create a directrory inside of a raw device, a filesystem
    > > is the only way.
    >
    > filesystems are a logical thing. they resides on the disks itself and
    > their access is through the file system buffer cache, and they uses
    > block devices.
    >
    > for raw devices, they bypasses the file system's buffer cache and
    > gives you "direct" access to the device.
    Realistically there's no difference between raw devices and block
    devices like that. It is a historical distinction no longer used.
    > 1) filesystem is in the block device category?
    Irrelevant block vs raw. Filesystem is formatting method. Raw
    or block is unformatted method. Filesystems live inside of
    logical volumes, block devices, raw devices, etc.

    Filesystem is inside of block device. Layer of the onion not
    a question of categories.
    Doug Freyburger Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: filesystem or rawdevice

    [email]dfreybur[/email] (Doug Freyburger) wrote in message news:<7960d3ee.0408200847.2c551ca6posting.google. com>...
    > yls177 wrote:
    > > Doug Freyburger wrote:
    > >
    > > > Filesystems contain files or directories. Raw devices do not. If
    > > > you wish to create a directrory inside of a raw device, a filesystem
    > > > is the only way.
    > >
    > > filesystems are a logical thing. they resides on the disks itself and
    > > their access is through the file system buffer cache, and they uses
    > > block devices.
    > >
    > > for raw devices, they bypasses the file system's buffer cache and
    > > gives you "direct" access to the device.
    >
    > Realistically there's no difference between raw devices and block
    > devices like that. It is a historical distinction no longer used.
    >
    > > 1) filesystem is in the block device category?
    >
    > Irrelevant block vs raw. Filesystem is formatting method. Raw
    > or block is unformatted method. Filesystems live inside of
    > logical volumes, block devices, raw devices, etc.
    >
    > Filesystem is inside of block device. Layer of the onion not
    > a question of categories.


    hi, thanks for replying. So the difference between raw (or block) and
    filesystem is the format method. Filesystem is format method while the
    other is unformat.

    Could u please elaborate more about this?

    Thanks
    yls177 Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: filesystem or rawdevice

    yls177 wrote:
    > Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > > Realistically there's no difference between raw devices and block
    > > devices like that. It is a historical distinction no longer used.
    ....
    > > Filesystem is inside of block device. Layer of the onion not
    > > a question of categories.
    >
    > So the difference between raw (or block) and
    > filesystem is the format method. Filesystem is format method while the
    > other is unformat.
    No, the primary difference is what layer of the onion. Devices are
    at a layer that doesn't address the content inside the device.
    Filesystems are at the layer of the onion that does include the
    content so filesystems are the format of the content.

    In layered modular design of Unix is important to understand. Learn
    what layers contain what function and you will be able to understand
    the difference. Fail to learn the layered nature of Unix and you
    will continue asking the question in a way that doesn't lead to a
    sensible answer. Layer after layer, Unix peels like an onion.
    Learn what is in each layer.

    In fact, the 7-layer ISO networking model is expressed like it is
    a Unix system. Starting at the hardware and moving out to the user
    interface. Your filesystem or raw device is rather like asking
    layer 2 or 3 in the ISO networking model.
    Doug Freyburger Guest

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