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Does anyone know how to get a "stainless steel" look using filters, styles, etc..?...

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  1. #1

    Default filters

    Does anyone know how to get a "stainless steel" look using filters, styles, etc..?
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    Gretchen Steinbecker Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: filters

    google "steel tutorial photoshop"

    first result of about 4000:

    <http://www.stickysauce.com/tutorials/photoshop/steel.htm>
    dave milbut Guest

  3. #3

    Default filters

    Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial and
    error to take clear, nice shots.
    I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    Can you put more than one filter on at a time?

    Thanks for your help

    Fiona


    fi Guest

  4. Moderated Post

    Default Re: filters

    Removed by Administrator
    Warner Crump Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: filters

    On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 16:21:37 +1000, "fi" <fm30pacific.net.au> wrote:
    >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial and
    >error to take clear, nice shots.
    >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    >Thanks for your help
    >Fiona
    In many cases you can. Most filters have threads in the front that
    allow another filter to be ed ontop of it. Some slimline filters
    don't have the front threads.

    In some cases, though, you may not want to do this, because the
    additional filters may cause vignetting. This happens primarily on
    wide angle prime lenses or zooms with wide angle capability...however,
    it can happen on other focal lengths as well, just depends on the
    particular lens.

    There are some combination filters made, such as Skylight/Polarizer or
    Warming/Polarizer, which combine two filters into one.
    Slingblade Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: filters


    "Slingblade" <bladeREMOVEslingerearthREMOVElink.net> wrote in message
    news:ci8slvctagh16q4vptg3l09ab3h4qce3c04ax.com...
    > On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 16:21:37 +1000, "fi" <fm30pacific.net.au> wrote:
    >
    > >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial and
    > >error to take clear, nice shots.
    > >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    > >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    > >Thanks for your help
    > >Fiona
    >
    > In many cases you can. Most filters have threads in the front that
    > allow another filter to be ed ontop of it. Some slimline filters
    > don't have the front threads.
    >
    > In some cases, though, you may not want to do this, because the
    > additional filters may cause vignetting. This happens primarily on
    > wide angle prime lenses or zooms with wide angle capability...however,
    > it can happen on other focal lengths as well, just depends on the
    > particular lens.
    >
    > There are some combination filters made, such as Skylight/Polarizer or
    > Warming/Polarizer, which combine two filters into one.
    The filter factors have to be considered as well, as they are additive. The
    more you use the less light entering the lens, and the greater exposure
    needed. Cameras with through the lens metering should alert you to an
    appropriate setting, but some head scatching and calulating is in order when
    using a hand held light meter.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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    John Garrison Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: filters

    x-no-archive: yes
    "John Garrison"
    > > >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial and
    > > >error to take clear, nice shots.
    > > >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    > > >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    I'd be interested to know what specific combinations of filters he has in
    mind . . .

    He says that he is going to "start experimenting" with filters, and that he
    has just learned, through trial and error, to take "nice clear shots."

    I get the feeling that the term "filter factor" probably doesn't mean a
    thing to him, at his current level of expertise.


    Jeremy Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: filters


    "Jeremy" <jeremyno-spam-thanks.com> wrote in message
    news:aSr7b.2143$TC1.258newsread2.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
    > x-no-archive: yes
    > "John Garrison"
    > > > >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial
    and
    > > > >error to take clear, nice shots.
    > > > >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    > > > >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    >
    > I'd be interested to know what specific combinations of filters he has in
    > mind . . .
    >
    > He says that he is going to "start experimenting" with filters, and that
    he
    > has just learned, through trial and error, to take "nice clear shots."
    >
    > I get the feeling that the term "filter factor" probably doesn't mean a
    > thing to him, at his current level of expertise.
    >
    >
    Well perhaps, but would not the rest of my post let him infer that filter
    factor refers to the reduction of light transmission? It would though be
    prudent to say that filter factors are measured in stops. A 2x factor needs
    2 stops additional exposure, unless my math is as usual faulty.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system ([url]http://www.grisoft.com[/url]).
    Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 9/1/2003


    John Garrison Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: filters

    To answer your questions (hopefully)

    1) yes, you can put filters over filters. However, as others have pointed
    out, you have to be wary of vignetting. In other words, if you put too many
    filters on, vignetting is when the filters starting cutting off the image at
    the corners.

    2) some filters reduce the amount of light entering the lens. However, you
    most likely have a camera with thru the lens metering, so the camera meter
    will adjust for the filters

    3) with a polarizing filter, if you have a newer camera, you probably need a
    circular polarizer. If your camera is older, you might get by with a regular
    polarizer (but are regular polarizers available any more?)

    Now, sort of a soap box speech......

    Realize that I come from a photojournalism background. Thus, I sort of
    follow a minimalist approach to "gadgets" including filters. Other people
    will have different opinions.

    Use filters sparingly. When I started out with photography, I had visions in
    my mind of all the cool effects I could make with filters. Yes, they seemed
    neat then, but now, when going through my stock images, I cringe when I see
    all the Cokin filters I used. Personally, I think that the key to effective
    filter use is to create an image with little to no clue that a filter was
    used. If you want effects, scan it in and play with it with all the image
    enhancement software currently available.

    The filters I would recommend (if I may be so bold).....polarizer, gradiated
    neutral density, regular neutral density, a red one for black and white and
    black and white infrared (sorry, can't remember the number), and a SLIGHT
    warming filter.

    Focus your energy and creative passion on....
    - observing your surroundings. Many people with cameras are impatient, thus
    they take minimal amount of time to snap the shutter.
    - getting up close to your subjects. favor the 35mm lens range versus the
    telephoto range. the 35mm combined with getting up close to your subjects
    will pull your viewers in. yes, it's difficult to be comfortable operating
    so close, but learn how to do it before you learn how you can get neat
    effects with filters.
    - trying a bunch of different types of film. don't just stick with royal
    gold, kodak max, or whatever fuji and kodak are selling at target or
    walmart. try the pro films...you don't have to be one to use them. try the
    high speed and low speed. try chromes. learn what type of film best brings
    across what you'd like to bring across...not what a majority in this news
    group say is the film to use.

    This is by no means an exhaustive list, but I need to get to bed. Above all,
    experiment, but don't think that a bunch of special effects filters make a
    good image.

    just a thought,
    david




    "John Garrison" <jonnycandoyoumustremovethis.cox.net> wrote in message
    news:3Gr7b.40875$Nc.9749171news1.news.adelphia.ne t...
    >
    > "Slingblade" <bladeREMOVEslingerearthREMOVElink.net> wrote in message
    > news:ci8slvctagh16q4vptg3l09ab3h4qce3c04ax.com...
    > > On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 16:21:37 +1000, "fi" <fm30pacific.net.au> wrote:
    > >
    > > >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial and
    > > >error to take clear, nice shots.
    > > >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    > > >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    > > >Thanks for your help
    > > >Fiona
    > >
    > > In many cases you can. Most filters have threads in the front that
    > > allow another filter to be ed ontop of it. Some slimline filters
    > > don't have the front threads.
    > >
    > > In some cases, though, you may not want to do this, because the
    > > additional filters may cause vignetting. This happens primarily on
    > > wide angle prime lenses or zooms with wide angle capability...however,
    > > it can happen on other focal lengths as well, just depends on the
    > > particular lens.
    > >
    > > There are some combination filters made, such as Skylight/Polarizer or
    > > Warming/Polarizer, which combine two filters into one.
    >
    > The filter factors have to be considered as well, as they are additive.
    The
    > more you use the less light entering the lens, and the greater exposure
    > needed. Cameras with through the lens metering should alert you to an
    > appropriate setting, but some head scatching and calulating is in order
    when
    > using a hand held light meter.
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system ([url]http://www.grisoft.com[/url]).
    > Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 9/1/2003
    >
    >

    David Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: filters

    Just to clear Polarizing Filters up a little. When you say old camera you
    mean a camera that does not have "through the lens metering" (TTL) and when
    you say new camera you mean a camera that has "through the lens metering."

    No TTL = Linear Polarizer (which are still available)
    TTL = Circular Polarizer

    Have we thrown enough information at you? :oP

    Warner
    "David" <dkbowmanspamisreallyannoyingcox.net> wrote in message
    news:dqw7b.39128$Go4.31240lakeread01...
    > To answer your questions (hopefully)
    >
    > 1) yes, you can put filters over filters. However, as others have pointed
    > out, you have to be wary of vignetting. In other words, if you put too
    many
    > filters on, vignetting is when the filters starting cutting off the image
    at
    > the corners.
    >
    > 2) some filters reduce the amount of light entering the lens. However, you
    > most likely have a camera with thru the lens metering, so the camera meter
    > will adjust for the filters
    >
    > 3) with a polarizing filter, if you have a newer camera, you probably need
    a
    > circular polarizer. If your camera is older, you might get by with a
    regular
    > polarizer (but are regular polarizers available any more?)
    >
    > Now, sort of a soap box speech......
    >
    > Realize that I come from a photojournalism background. Thus, I sort of
    > follow a minimalist approach to "gadgets" including filters. Other people
    > will have different opinions.
    >
    > Use filters sparingly. When I started out with photography, I had visions
    in
    > my mind of all the cool effects I could make with filters. Yes, they
    seemed
    > neat then, but now, when going through my stock images, I cringe when I
    see
    > all the Cokin filters I used. Personally, I think that the key to
    effective
    > filter use is to create an image with little to no clue that a filter was
    > used. If you want effects, scan it in and play with it with all the image
    > enhancement software currently available.
    >
    > The filters I would recommend (if I may be so bold).....polarizer,
    gradiated
    > neutral density, regular neutral density, a red one for black and white
    and
    > black and white infrared (sorry, can't remember the number), and a SLIGHT
    > warming filter.
    >
    > Focus your energy and creative passion on....
    > - observing your surroundings. Many people with cameras are impatient,
    thus
    > they take minimal amount of time to snap the shutter.
    > - getting up close to your subjects. favor the 35mm lens range versus the
    > telephoto range. the 35mm combined with getting up close to your subjects
    > will pull your viewers in. yes, it's difficult to be comfortable operating
    > so close, but learn how to do it before you learn how you can get neat
    > effects with filters.
    > - trying a bunch of different types of film. don't just stick with royal
    > gold, kodak max, or whatever fuji and kodak are selling at target or
    > walmart. try the pro films...you don't have to be one to use them. try the
    > high speed and low speed. try chromes. learn what type of film best brings
    > across what you'd like to bring across...not what a majority in this news
    > group say is the film to use.
    >
    > This is by no means an exhaustive list, but I need to get to bed. Above
    all,
    > experiment, but don't think that a bunch of special effects filters make a
    > good image.
    >
    > just a thought,
    > david
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "John Garrison" <jonnycandoyoumustremovethis.cox.net> wrote in message
    > news:3Gr7b.40875$Nc.9749171news1.news.adelphia.ne t...
    > >
    > > "Slingblade" <bladeREMOVEslingerearthREMOVElink.net> wrote in message
    > > news:ci8slvctagh16q4vptg3l09ab3h4qce3c04ax.com...
    > > > On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 16:21:37 +1000, "fi" <fm30pacific.net.au> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial
    and
    > > > >error to take clear, nice shots.
    > > > >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    > > > >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    > > > >Thanks for your help
    > > > >Fiona
    > > >
    > > > In many cases you can. Most filters have threads in the front that
    > > > allow another filter to be ed ontop of it. Some slimline filters
    > > > don't have the front threads.
    > > >
    > > > In some cases, though, you may not want to do this, because the
    > > > additional filters may cause vignetting. This happens primarily on
    > > > wide angle prime lenses or zooms with wide angle capability...however,
    > > > it can happen on other focal lengths as well, just depends on the
    > > > particular lens.
    > > >
    > > > There are some combination filters made, such as Skylight/Polarizer or
    > > > Warming/Polarizer, which combine two filters into one.
    > >
    > > The filter factors have to be considered as well, as they are additive.
    > The
    > > more you use the less light entering the lens, and the greater exposure
    > > needed. Cameras with through the lens metering should alert you to an
    > > appropriate setting, but some head scatching and calulating is in order
    > when
    > > using a hand held light meter.
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > > Checked by AVG anti-virus system ([url]http://www.grisoft.com[/url]).
    > > Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 9/1/2003
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    Warner Crump Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: filters

    Not correct. A Canon AE-1 can take a regular polarizer, yet it has through
    the lens metering. The Canon F-1N (still an older camera) needs the
    circular. Many, if not all, of the autofocus cameras today need the
    circular.

    David
    "Warner Crump" <warner_crump> wrote in message
    news:6BG7b.25627$162.9890twister.austin.rr.com...
    > Just to clear Polarizing Filters up a little. When you say old camera you
    > mean a camera that does not have "through the lens metering" (TTL) and
    when
    > you say new camera you mean a camera that has "through the lens metering."
    >
    > No TTL = Linear Polarizer (which are still available)
    > TTL = Circular Polarizer
    >
    > Have we thrown enough information at you? :oP
    >
    > Warner
    > "David" <dkbowmanspamisreallyannoyingcox.net> wrote in message
    > news:dqw7b.39128$Go4.31240lakeread01...
    > > To answer your questions (hopefully)
    > >
    > > 1) yes, you can put filters over filters. However, as others have
    pointed
    > > out, you have to be wary of vignetting. In other words, if you put too
    > many
    > > filters on, vignetting is when the filters starting cutting off the
    image
    > at
    > > the corners.
    > >
    > > 2) some filters reduce the amount of light entering the lens. However,
    you
    > > most likely have a camera with thru the lens metering, so the camera
    meter
    > > will adjust for the filters
    > >
    > > 3) with a polarizing filter, if you have a newer camera, you probably
    need
    > a
    > > circular polarizer. If your camera is older, you might get by with a
    > regular
    > > polarizer (but are regular polarizers available any more?)
    > >
    > > Now, sort of a soap box speech......
    > >
    > > Realize that I come from a photojournalism background. Thus, I sort of
    > > follow a minimalist approach to "gadgets" including filters. Other
    people
    > > will have different opinions.
    > >
    > > Use filters sparingly. When I started out with photography, I had
    visions
    > in
    > > my mind of all the cool effects I could make with filters. Yes, they
    > seemed
    > > neat then, but now, when going through my stock images, I cringe when I
    > see
    > > all the Cokin filters I used. Personally, I think that the key to
    > effective
    > > filter use is to create an image with little to no clue that a filter
    was
    > > used. If you want effects, scan it in and play with it with all the
    image
    > > enhancement software currently available.
    > >
    > > The filters I would recommend (if I may be so bold).....polarizer,
    > gradiated
    > > neutral density, regular neutral density, a red one for black and white
    > and
    > > black and white infrared (sorry, can't remember the number), and a
    SLIGHT
    > > warming filter.
    > >
    > > Focus your energy and creative passion on....
    > > - observing your surroundings. Many people with cameras are impatient,
    > thus
    > > they take minimal amount of time to snap the shutter.
    > > - getting up close to your subjects. favor the 35mm lens range versus
    the
    > > telephoto range. the 35mm combined with getting up close to your
    subjects
    > > will pull your viewers in. yes, it's difficult to be comfortable
    operating
    > > so close, but learn how to do it before you learn how you can get neat
    > > effects with filters.
    > > - trying a bunch of different types of film. don't just stick with royal
    > > gold, kodak max, or whatever fuji and kodak are selling at target or
    > > walmart. try the pro films...you don't have to be one to use them. try
    the
    > > high speed and low speed. try chromes. learn what type of film best
    brings
    > > across what you'd like to bring across...not what a majority in this
    news
    > > group say is the film to use.
    > >
    > > This is by no means an exhaustive list, but I need to get to bed. Above
    > all,
    > > experiment, but don't think that a bunch of special effects filters make
    a
    > > good image.
    > >
    > > just a thought,
    > > david
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "John Garrison" <jonnycandoyoumustremovethis.cox.net> wrote in message
    > > news:3Gr7b.40875$Nc.9749171news1.news.adelphia.ne t...
    > > >
    > > > "Slingblade" <bladeREMOVEslingerearthREMOVElink.net> wrote in message
    > > > news:ci8slvctagh16q4vptg3l09ab3h4qce3c04ax.com...
    > > > > On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 16:21:37 +1000, "fi" <fm30pacific.net.au> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > >Hey, Im new to photography. The last yr just learning through trial
    > and
    > > > > >error to take clear, nice shots.
    > > > > >I feel good enough now to start experimenting with filters.
    > > > > >Can you put more than one filter on at a time?
    > > > > >Thanks for your help
    > > > > >Fiona
    > > > >
    > > > > In many cases you can. Most filters have threads in the front that
    > > > > allow another filter to be ed ontop of it. Some slimline
    filters
    > > > > don't have the front threads.
    > > > >
    > > > > In some cases, though, you may not want to do this, because the
    > > > > additional filters may cause vignetting. This happens primarily on
    > > > > wide angle prime lenses or zooms with wide angle
    capability...however,
    > > > > it can happen on other focal lengths as well, just depends on the
    > > > > particular lens.
    > > > >
    > > > > There are some combination filters made, such as Skylight/Polarizer
    or
    > > > > Warming/Polarizer, which combine two filters into one.
    > > >
    > > > The filter factors have to be considered as well, as they are
    additive.
    > > The
    > > > more you use the less light entering the lens, and the greater
    exposure
    > > > needed. Cameras with through the lens metering should alert you to an
    > > > appropriate setting, but some head scatching and calulating is in
    order
    > > when
    > > > using a hand held light meter.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > ---
    > > > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > > > Checked by AVG anti-virus system ([url]http://www.grisoft.com[/url]).
    > > > Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 9/1/2003
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    David Guest

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