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Finally got it. - Photography

I got my D70 today. I've just been using it in Auto mode, and tried some of my older Nikon lenses on it in manual mode. So far my impressions are that it is extremely fast, both focusing and shooting. It feels like a "real" camera, very solid and nice to hold. JPEG photos look very good, but it's gonna take me awhile to get past the learning curve. Also, the controls seem to be well placed, including all the buttons. Everything just seems to fall into place when you hold it. One nice touch is that the diopter adjustment ...

  1. #1

    Default Finally got it.

    I got my D70 today. I've just been using it in Auto mode, and tried some of
    my older Nikon lenses on it in manual mode. So far my impressions are that
    it is extremely fast, both focusing and shooting. It feels like a "real"
    camera, very solid and nice to hold. JPEG photos look very good, but it's
    gonna take me awhile to get past the learning curve. Also, the controls
    seem to be well placed, including all the buttons. Everything just seems to
    fall into place when you hold it.

    One nice touch is that the diopter adjustment works extremely well. I wear
    contacts set to monovision: My left lens is set to distance while my right
    is set to reading. I was very concerned about this, hoping I wouldn't have
    to get new contacts, or wear glasses all the time. One quick adjustment on
    the diopter and everything just snapped into focus.

    You get an adaptor that holds 3 CR-2 batteries for emergencies, but three of
    these things cost almost as much as a spare rechargeable, so I've already
    ordered a second battery and an AC adaptor (why is the AC adaptor so
    expensive compared to the other models?). I got the AC adaptor in case I
    have to clean the CCD. Figured it was cheaper than a repair if the battery
    gave out.

    Thanks to all for the help, and I'm sure I'll have more questions as I
    stumble through the manual. Can't wait to get my micro lens back from
    conversion. That should be fun, although the lens that comes with the "kit"
    focuses pretty close.

    Also, hard to get used to the Auto feature lowering the shutter speed to the
    point where you can't hand-hold it. I'm learning.

    Sheldon
    net


    Sheldon Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 21:36:17 -0700, "Sheldon" <net>
    wrote:
     

    But the idea is that in an emergency you can go to a shop and buy some. They
    also have a high shelf life, so you could keep three for emergencies and they'll
    still be good as new when you need them.

     

    You'll soon learn to get away from auto.

    --
    Chris Pollard


    CG Internet café, Tagum City, Philippines
    http://www.cginternet.net
    Christopher Guest

  3. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Removed by Administrator
    Sheldon Guest
    Moderated Post

  4. #4

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 21:36:17 -0700, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
    "Sheldon" <net> wrote:
     

    Please do yourself a favor and stop using Auto mode ASAP. You really gain
    nothing from using Auto over Programmed mode. You do however introduce a
    whole bunch of uncontrolled in camera processing when shooting in Auto. The
    in camera adjustments are made dependent upon the image content. IMO,
    you're better off using Program mode AND going into the menus and setting
    all the adjustments ( sharpening, saturation, contrast, etc.) to fixed
    values so you know what you are getting and can get up on the learning
    curve more quickly. See Optimizing Images p.56 of the manual. Specifically,
    I'm talking about choosing the custom option. This allows direct control of
    all the settings.
     

    I just make sure I pop in a freshly charged batt, myself.
     

    I'd recommend Thom Hogan's e-book. Depends on your point of view. The kit
    lens focuses as close as 1.2 ft. Coming from a CP-990 and 5700 which get
    down to 1cm, it takes a bit to remember this. Especially, as I still use
    the other two, especially for macros at work.
    ----------
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Ruf.com)
    See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
    Ed Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Sheldon wrote:
     

    Congrats!

    I reccomend that you shoot in "A" mode as much as possible and control the DOF
    for the desired composition. "A" mode is 'semi auto' in that you choose your
    aperture and the camera computes the speed based on the meter reading.

    (or "S" where motion control is a priority).

    Really learn the metering system. Examine the histograms and adjust exposure comp.
     

    These chargers contain a DC-DC converter, not just a simple xfrmr-rectifier, so
    they do cost more.
     

    Shoot "S" priority to be in control of the shutter speed.
    Shoot "A" priority to be in control of DOF.
    Use a tripod.
    Focus manually too.
    Post results.

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Finally got it.


    "Alan Browne" <ca> wrote in message
    news:ct89qi$7p1$gazeta.pl... 
    >
    > Congrats!
    >
    > I reccomend that you shoot in "A" mode as much as possible and control the
    > DOF for the desired composition. "A" mode is 'semi auto' in that you
    > choose your aperture and the camera computes the speed based on the meter
    > reading.
    >
    > (or "S" where motion control is a priority).
    >
    > Really learn the metering system. Examine the histograms and adjust
    > exposure comp.

    >
    > These chargers contain a DC-DC converter, not just a simple
    > xfrmr-rectifier, so they do cost more.

    >
    > Shoot "S" priority to be in control of the shutter speed.
    > Shoot "A" priority to be in control of DOF.
    > Use a tripod.
    > Focus manually too.
    > Post results.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Alan[/ref]

    I'm pretty familiar with a lot of this stuff, except it did take me awhile
    to figure out why I couldn't do much in Automatic mode. So far all I want
    to do is take some shots and make sure all is working well. I have a lot of
    photos of my foot, and other things around the living room. :-) No time yet
    to go out and get serious with the thing. After all, I've gotta pay for it.
    :-(

    Compared to my P&S, I'm looking forward to having the opportunity to play a
    bit with depth of field. Really adds a lot to many photos, especially
    portraits.

    Thanks.

    Sheldon


    Sheldon Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Finally got it.


    "Sheldon" <net> wrote in message
    news:com... 

    <snip>
     


    Sheldon,

    From one newbie to another, I just went through the same learning curve with
    my Canon 300D. I made the mistake of starting out in Auto mode and was very
    disappointed. Soon there after I moved to Program mode, gained back the
    control I had with my manual camera and haven't gone back to Auto since.
    I've been very happy.

    The second thing I did was to start shooting in RAW mode and using Capture
    One for RAW image manipulation and conversion. After C1, I use Photoshop
    for any further editing, although my PS skills are very limited. Note that
    PScs has RAW conversion built (free download) in but I have PS7.

    In any event, the quality of the final images are much better then anything
    I was able to get from Auto mode.

    --

    Rob





    Robert Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Sheldon wrote:
     

    Then "A" or "M" mode. I say "M" 'cause I shoot portraits without TTL flash
    (either studio strobes, natural light or sometimes hot lights). An incident
    meter (or spot meter that can do flash as well) is of course a key tool, but
    with a digital camera you can find acceptable exposure via the monitor/histogram.

    If you have a lens with close focus (pref. a macro but 50mm f/1.8 isn't bad)
    then there area all kinds of things you can find around the house to practice on.

    Cheers,
    Alan


    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Alan Browne <ca> wrote:
     

    Not with a digital... until someone makes one with a proper focusing screen,
    at least. It's next to impossible to manually focus a D70, even with an
    f/1.8 lens, which is about my only complaint with it.

    Luckily, Nikon's autofocus can be mastered; I can get it to focus on what
    I want, even though branches or whatever. The only defect with Nikon is
    that it's a bit slow in initial target acquisition sometimes, which can
    get annoying if you're shooting wildlife or something. I'd really want
    a proper focusing screen for that situation. (I understand that Canon's
    autofocus does somewhat better at that, but that one thing is far from
    enough to get me to switch.)

    --
    Jeremy | com
    Jeremy Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 20:24:22 -0000, Jeremy Nixon <com>
    wrote:
     
    >
    >Not with a digital... until someone makes one with a proper focusing screen,
    >at least. It's next to impossible to manually focus a D70, even with an
    >f/1.8 lens, which is about my only complaint with it.[/ref]

    I've had good success doing this, with the kit lens.
     

    If you think you can focus faster than the D70, why not switch it to
    manual, and use the little green "you've got focus" light at the far
    left of the viewfinder to assist you. I do this to prevent the AF from
    hunting when using long lenses.

    Keep the designated focus area locked to the center one, and then the
    process is similar to using a split-screen. Focus, re-frame, shoot. I
    also keep CSM-16 (AE lock on half-press) switched off to allow matrix
    to work properly. Keep your eye on the subject, and you'll see the
    focus light illuminate in your peripheral vision.

    I too would prefer to use the old screen, but we do the best with what
    we have.

    --
    Owamanga!
    Owamanga Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Jeremy Nixon wrote:
     
    >
    >
    > Not with a digital... until someone makes one with a proper focusing screen,
    > at least. It's next to impossible to manually focus a D70, even with an
    > f/1.8 lens, which is about my only complaint with it.
    >
    > Luckily, Nikon's autofocus can be mastered; I can get it to focus on what
    > I want, even though branches or whatever. The only defect with Nikon is
    > that it's a bit slow in initial target acquisition sometimes, which can
    > get annoying if you're shooting wildlife or something. I'd really want
    > a proper focusing screen for that situation. (I understand that Canon's
    > autofocus does somewhat better at that, but that one thing is far from
    > enough to get me to switch.)[/ref]

    The Maxxum's use "acat" screens which are fairly easy to focus except in very
    low light. There is a special version of the screen for very shallow DOF (at
    the expense of some light loss in the viewfinder). The Acat is a very good
    screen and Leica (or is it Hasselblad?) buy it from Minolta for their cameras.

    AF in general, regardless of the camera maker, is not as accurate as manual
    focus, assuming the VF allows you to do so.

    OTOH, MF with an AF lens is also harder as there is less "drag" resulting in
    'nervous' manual focus. MF lenses are naturally "draggy" and it damps out fine
    finger movement.

    Cheers,
    Alan



    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Owamanga <com> wrote:

     
    >
    > I've had good success doing this, with the kit lens.[/ref]

    I can't do it worth a damn, not with critical accuracy. I can't even do
    it with critical accuracy with the 50/1.8. Well, okay, I probably could,
    but it would take too long and be somewhat hit-or-miss. The combination
    of no focusing screen and the tiny viewfinder area just destroys my
    manual focus chops.

    Did you practice and eventually get used to it? I gave up on it pretty
    quickly.
     

    Well, that's just it -- I *don't* think I can focus faster than the D70
    with the viewfinder the way it is. And the green light isn't very useful
    when many of the situations where I'd want to manually focus are the
    exact ones where AF won't work. :)

    I'm good enough with the AF that I really only have the desire to switch
    to manual when the AF can't get the job done -- low light (in which case
    speed is rarely a concern) or tricky situations in which, with a proper
    focusing screen, I *could* focus faster than the AF (and used to, with
    my old film SLR) because it's going to get confused and lock onto the
    wrong thing.
     

    You know, it's interesting. Coming from that background, I found that
    I was almost always using the center AF sensor. But lately I'm using
    the arrow keypad to move it around a bit more and I'm finding that
    quite useful, though it takes a little getting used to. I haven't
    dared to try the "automatic" mode where it decides what to use on its
    own; that gives me the willies.
     

    Yep. This one little thing *definitely* isn't enough to get me to ever
    deal with film again. :)

    --
    Jeremy | com
    Jeremy Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Finally got it.


    "Alan Browne" <ca> wrote in message
    news:ct8omu$npv$gazeta.pl... 
    >
    > Then "A" or "M" mode. I say "M" 'cause I shoot portraits without TTL
    > flash (either studio strobes, natural light or sometimes hot lights). An
    > incident meter (or spot meter that can do flash as well) is of course a
    > key tool, but with a digital camera you can find acceptable exposure via
    > the monitor/histogram.
    >
    > If you have a lens with close focus (pref. a macro but 50mm f/1.8 isn't
    > bad) then there area all kinds of things you can find around the house to
    > practice on.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Alan[/ref]

    I have a 55 micro and an 85 1.8. The latter is what I plan on using for
    portraits. Most will be natural light or flash fill from the camera. I
    don't want to get back into studio photography.



    Sheldon Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    Not sure what the complaint is. On my F's I got rid of the fancy focus
    screens and replaced then with clear centers. I'd rather use my own eyes to
    focus than let a fancy screen do it. Have you played with the diopter
    adjustment? Not sure why, but the smaller area, compared to a full size
    focus screen, doesn't really bother me.

    Sheldon

    "Jeremy Nixon" <com> wrote in message
    news:supernews.com... 
    >>
    >> I've had good success doing this, with the kit lens.[/ref]
    >
    > I can't do it worth a damn, not with critical accuracy. I can't even do
    > it with critical accuracy with the 50/1.8. Well, okay, I probably could,
    > but it would take too long and be somewhat hit-or-miss. The combination
    > of no focusing screen and the tiny viewfinder area just destroys my
    > manual focus chops.
    >
    > Did you practice and eventually get used to it? I gave up on it pretty
    > quickly.

    >
    > Well, that's just it -- I *don't* think I can focus faster than the D70
    > with the viewfinder the way it is. And the green light isn't very useful
    > when many of the situations where I'd want to manually focus are the
    > exact ones where AF won't work. :)
    >
    > I'm good enough with the AF that I really only have the desire to switch
    > to manual when the AF can't get the job done -- low light (in which case
    > speed is rarely a concern) or tricky situations in which, with a proper
    > focusing screen, I *could* focus faster than the AF (and used to, with
    > my old film SLR) because it's going to get confused and lock onto the
    > wrong thing.

    >
    > You know, it's interesting. Coming from that background, I found that
    > I was almost always using the center AF sensor. But lately I'm using
    > the arrow keypad to move it around a bit more and I'm finding that
    > quite useful, though it takes a little getting used to. I haven't
    > dared to try the "automatic" mode where it decides what to use on its
    > own; that gives me the willies.

    >
    > Yep. This one little thing *definitely* isn't enough to get me to ever
    > deal with film again. :)
    >
    > --
    > Jeremy | com[/ref]


    Sheldon Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 21:10:18 -0000, Jeremy Nixon <com>
    wrote:
     
    >>
    >> I've had good success doing this, with the kit lens.[/ref]
    >
    >I can't do it worth a damn, not with critical accuracy. I can't even do
    >it with critical accuracy with the 50/1.8. Well, okay, I probably could,
    >but it would take too long and be somewhat hit-or-miss. The combination
    >of no focusing screen and the tiny viewfinder area just destroys my
    >manual focus chops.
    >
    >Did you practice and eventually get used to it? I gave up on it pretty
    >quickly.[/ref]

    I only do this when out shooting birds. And no, my hit rate isn't
    brilliant because the damn birds move all the time. I haven't done
    anything remotely like a scientific test.
     
    >
    >Well, that's just it -- I *don't* think I can focus faster than the D70
    >with the viewfinder the way it is. And the green light isn't very useful
    >when many of the situations where I'd want to manually focus are the
    >exact ones where AF won't work. :)[/ref]

    I learned using firstly an OM-2 and then a Minolta something, both had
    split-screen focusing circle right bang in the middle of the screen. I
    always used that, so always choosing the center spot for focusing and
    then re-framing is something I am completely used to.
     
    >
    >You know, it's interesting. Coming from that background, I found that
    >I was almost always using the center AF sensor. But lately I'm using
    >the arrow keypad to move it around a bit more and I'm finding that
    >quite useful, though it takes a little getting used to. I haven't
    >dared to try the "automatic" mode where it decides what to use on its
    >own; that gives me the willies.[/ref]

    ...and doesn't work that well (D70 anyway). I've tried several times
    with birds in flight. Simple enough - that there is the bird, then the
    sky. Two things, and the bird is always closer. Keeping the damn bird
    over at least one of those focus areas *all* of the time is
    impossible, so the sky wins.

    ;-)
     
    >
    >Yep. This one little thing *definitely* isn't enough to get me to ever
    >deal with film again. :)[/ref]


    --
    Owamanga!
    Owamanga Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Finally got it.

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 21:36:17 -0700, "Sheldon" <net>
    wrote:
     

    Great! Can't wait to see your work on alt.binaries.photos.original !
     

    First - put it into 'P' mode at least!! In this mode you can choose other
    settings just by turning the thumb wheel. For example, if the camera picks
    1/25sec and F16 and you don't like the slow shutter, just spin the wheel until
    it says maybe 1/100 at 5.6 or whatever... you get the same shot. Or if you want
    to limit the DOF, spin it to the maximum F 3.5 or whatever, at maybe 1/500 or
    whatever - again, same shot. ( say 'whatever' a lot...)

    Watch for an indicator in the top display to tell you that you have selected a
    custom exposure or the camera choice exposure.

    Once you learn this, go into the CSM menu and turn on EXP COMP, and now the
    other wheel becomes a compensator dial, allowing you to brighten or darken the
    image. There is a little 'meter' to show what you are doing.

    You would be surprised at all you can do with this setting.

    Next, you can learn "manual"!
     

    You'll find the battery's last for thousands of shots!! Not like the P&S!
     

    see above!

    One feature you may like is the fact that with a telephoto lens, the camera will
    pick high shutter speeds automatically.
     

    Bob Guest

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