Professional Web Applications Themes

Focusing woes... - Photography

Hi all, Does anyone have any tips for sharp focusing? I've got a manual focus camera, and I find it quite hard to get my subject in focus - or I'll think that my is subject in focus but when the pics come back from the lab the subject is a bit fuzzy (but the leaves behind are perfect!!!). Is it just a case of practice makes perfect? How long did it you guys to regularly get things in focus? or do you all use auto focus cameras? Oh, and the kind of photos I'm talking about are of the ...

  1. #1

    Default Focusing woes...

    Hi all,

    Does anyone have any tips for sharp focusing?
    I've got a manual focus camera, and I find it quite hard to get my subject
    in focus - or I'll think that my is subject in focus but when the pics come
    back from the lab the subject is a bit fuzzy (but the leaves behind are
    perfect!!!). Is it just a case of practice makes perfect? How long did it
    you guys to regularly get things in focus?
    or do you all use auto focus cameras?
    Oh, and the kind of photos I'm talking about are of the point & shoot
    variety, ie catching the kids doing somthing in the garden, rather than a
    posed + tripod kind of pics (where I've got all the time I need to focus
    etc...)

    Thanks in advance for your opinions...
    ChrisB


    Chris Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    >From: "Chris Buckett" com 

    Hi Chris!

    The way I focus on an SLR is to focus right past the object and then snap back
    to bring it in sharp. And then leave it - don't fiddle!

    What is the maximum aperture of the lens you're using..?



    Duncan Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    50mm f1.8 typically.
    Fiddling could well be the problem as I'm never sure if it's quite spot
    on...

    ChrisB

    "Duncan Ross" <commercial> wrote in message
    news:aol.com... 
    >
    > Hi Chris!
    >
    > The way I focus on an SLR is to focus right past the object and then snap[/ref]
    back 


    Chris Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    >From: "Chris Buckett" com 
    >>
    >> Hi Chris!
    >>
    >> The way I focus on an SLR is to focus right past the object and then snap[/ref]
    >back 
    >
    >[/ref]

    That's a problem that took me some time to be rid of! :^D

    Certainly the lens is ideal for manual focus.


    Duncan Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 09:46:10 +0100, "Chris Buckett"
    <com> wrote:

    Chris, I am assuming that you have a SLR and with the lens you
    are using, the depth-of-field when focusing is as short as you can get
    for any focusing distance so the focusing will be more precise than
    when you take the photo. At that time, the lens will stop down to
    what the film needs.
    Any reduction of aperture increases the depth-of-field (zone
    of focus).
    Choose a shutter speed that is low enough to get a smaller
    aperture and a greater depth-of-field for focusing.
    If you need a faster shutter speed to get rid of image motion,
    whether it is caused my subject motion or camera motion, then the
    aperture will have a shorter range for any given film speed;
    therefore, consider a faster film to get the faster shutter and
    smaller aperture.
    Isn't photography fun?
    It really is and you have the correct camera to learn how much
    fun it can be.
    If by chance, you are using a RF camera, you could have a
    faulty range finder; one that is focusing one place but the lens is
    being focused on another place. This is not uncommon and can be
    corrected.

    Ken Cashion

     

    Ken Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    There's a lot more in focus behind the point at which you focus, so if you set
    it just a tiny bit in front of the subject, there will be a lot more "in"; OR
    the camera was at some point dropped, and the lens to film distance was
    changed; OR you can go to faster film and increase your depth of field, OR the
    mirror is slightly out of alignment and giving bad info. Years ago, cameras
    were set up for the slightly near-sighted, if you're not near-sighted, maybe a
    diopter would help. Try putting down a yardstick and focusing on the 2
    carefully, with the lens at f2. There should be twice as much in focus behind
    the 2 than in front. If the picture shows differently, there's something wrong
    with it. In the winter when my eyes start to tear and I can't focus or when I
    use a range finder, I just focus by the numbers.Bob Hickey
    Hickster0711 Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 14:42:52 +0100, "Bhup" <com> wrote:
     

    I will often have to turn the camera vertical to focus so
    the split field will be easier to use. I think there are more
    horizontal things in the world than vertical (did I really write
    that?) and I was wondering why so many split screens are horizontal.
    This is another reason I like the mechanical Yashica FX3 I am
    using again for a throw-around camera. It has a diagonal split field.
    I have never seen this on another camera but I think it a good idea.

    Ken Cashion, who really knows there are a lot of vertical
    things, too.
    Ken Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    I hope you have a microprism or split field focusing aid in your focusing
    screen .

    They are the best ways to focus a manual camera.
    Also its important to have good Eyesight as this reduces the error in
    focusing

    B
    "Chris Buckett" <com> wrote in message
    news:mP1_a.3061$blueyonder.co.uk... 
    come 
    it 


    Bhup Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    Hi,

    Thanks all for the comments, I am using an SLR (om10), with a split field
    focussing screen,
    I guess as time goes on, with experience I'll remember the relationship
    between aparature, dof and shutter speed.

    ChrisB


    "Bhup" <com> wrote in message
    news:o96_a.244$server.ntli.net... [/ref]
    subject 
    > come [/ref]
    did [/ref]

    >
    >[/ref]


    Chris Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    com (Ken Cashion) writes:
     

    The Nikon L and P focusing screens have diagonal split field
    indicators, too. Canon has screens with crossed (both horizontal
    and vertical) split field indicators.

    I prefer screens without microprisms or split-field indicators,
    but when I still used them, the P screen was my favorite.

    Regards,
    Chris

    --
    Bokeh test images: http://www.bokeh.de/en/bokeh_images.html
    Christoph Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Focusing woes...


    "Ken Cashion" <com> wrote in message
    news:datasync.com... 

    My Pentax P30t has a diagonal split field, but to be honest, it's always
    annoyed me a little bit. The SLRs I most regularly use have a horizontal
    split and that's always been good enough for me. Whenever I use the P30t, I
    get totally confused for a while - I *think* it comes down to when I get
    close to perfect focus I don't instinctively know which way to turn the
    focus ring, whereas I do with a horizontal split. Diagonal splits just look
    'weird' (to me, anyway).

    Chris.


    Chris Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    "Chris Buckett" <com> wrote in
    news:xp6_a.5783$blueyonder.co.uk:
     


    There is one important consideration on the OM-10. It has a
    replaceable focusing screen that is exceptionally easy to put in upside
    down. If this is the case, then you're focusing on a plane offset just over
    a millimeter from where it is supposed to be, and this is enough.

    It is also possible to have the screen ed slightly out of
    alignment. Either one of these can occur when the screen has been replaced
    or repaired, and the person doing so wasn't paying close attention.

    How to tell? Safest way is to attach a decent telephoto, and focus
    very carefully on something across the room, between 8 and 15 feet away.
    You'll see on the lens barrel the focus distances, and these are spread
    apart more for the shorter distances on a tele lens (my 75-260 zoom works
    great for this). Once you have sharp focus, manually measure the actual
    distance with a measuring tape (from the camera body, not the end of the
    lens). If the distance doesn't agree, the screen may be inverted. I cannot
    remember for sure, but I think if the actual distance is *shorter* than the
    lens number indicates it shows the screen is upside-down.

    You can also tell by feel, though this isn't recommended. The
    focusing screen sits just underneath the prism, and forms the top of the
    mirror box. Looking into the camera through the lensmount, it sits
    horizontally above the mirror. Wearing a fine rubber glove or cotton glove
    (clean and lint free), you can gently stroke your finger across the spot in
    the center of the screen - you should feel a very smooth dome, that's all.
    If you feel anything faintly sharp or pointed, the screen is inverted.

    [At this point, the people who have only read about camera safety
    will begin screaming about how delicate all the workings are and that you
    should never do this or it will ruin the camera, blah blah blah. The focus
    screen is made of plastic. The mirror is front-surfaced with a metal. While
    they are delicate and easily scratched, this still takes some effort to do
    so - they are not made of soap bubbles. If you use care and aren't an
    incredibly clumsy oaf, you'll be fine].

    You can also visually inspect the focus screen for its placement.
    Looking in there with a strong flashlight, you can see if all the sides are
    even and matching. There are also two small metal tabs at the back that
    hold the screen in place, semi-circular and with a hole in the center.
    These should match perfectly, and very slightly overlap the edges of the
    screen. If any of these factors aren't as described, then the screen could
    be out of align.

    Fixing it? Best left up to a repair shop, unless you've already done
    this yourself and that was, in fact, the cause (don't feel bad, it happens
    to some of us, *ahem*:-) ). So should you leave it to a shop in the first
    place? Depends. Was the shop the one that did it? Will they charge you to
    examine the camera? Will they still charge you if nothing is wrong? A good
    shop may be helpful and not charge you $60 an hour for a five-minute job
    that requires a driver, but...

    And of course, you can avoid the trip entirely if the screen is in
    place properly and it's your focus skills you need to concentrate on. You
    should also be aware that other manufacturers make brighter and sharper
    focusing screens for the OM-10 (like Beattie Intenscreen), and while they
    cost a bit more and require installation, it may be worth it to you.

    Good luck with it!


    - Al.

    --
    To reply, insert dash in address to match domain below
    Online photo gallery at www.wading-in.net
    Al Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Focusing woes...


    "Chris Buckett" <com> wrote in message
    news:xp6_a.5783$blueyonder.co.uk... 

    I've never really had any trouble with focusing correctly - I think the
    trick is to be a perfectionist. I select a point on an object to where I
    want perfect focus, I get the image exactly together on the split-screen,
    then I move the camera to get everything in frame as I want and check the
    focus again.
    At a recent motor-racing event I went to, I found the best way to focus on
    the cars as they screamed past me was to check the focus with a mark on the
    road's surface (fortunately there was a white mark on the road in roughly
    the right place from where I was standing) - then, as the cars drove over
    the mark, I took a photo.
    I guess just remember that it'll be a rubbish picture if you don't focus
    properly, so take as much time as you can to make sure that you're in focus.
    If you need to shoot quickly though (like for a candid shot or something),
    close the aperture down as much as you can, estimate the distance and select
    it on the lens, then hold the camera up and shoot.

    (another) Chris B.


    Chris Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Focusing woes...

    On 12 Aug 2003 16:28:47 +0200, Christoph Breitkopf
    <de> wrote:
     
    >
    >The Nikon L and P focusing screens have diagonal split field
    >indicators, too.[/ref]

    Chris, I have used a bunch of Nikons but we always had just a
    finely etched surfaces because we were doing a bunch of scientific
    work.
     

    Now, That is clever.
     

    I have both but when switching lenses back and forth, I
    usually end up using the microprisms.

    Ken Cashion

    Ken Guest

Similar Threads

  1. Activating (focusing) new bookmark?
    By Jeff_Bowell@adobeforums.com in forum Adobe Acrobat SDK
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 31st, 09:10 PM
  2. focusing digital camera
    By Paul in forum Photography
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: January 2nd, 09:14 PM
  3. Focusing more on Ruby ... Windows ver?
    By Ron Jeffries in forum Ruby
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: September 27th, 01:10 AM
  4. Focusing...
    By Snowy Rose in forum Photography
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: August 30th, 08:13 AM
  5. focusing on a textbox
    By Steven Zilberman in forum ASP.NET General
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: July 17th, 02:43 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139