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How can I tell at what times most of the updating is occurring? - MySQL

Hi, I need to know when the peak times are for updates/deletes/inserts. I have a series of binary logs. Is there a way to p these files to garner some indication of peak times? If so is there an elegant way of using 'mysqlbinlog' to do this? And/Or are there other programs out there that can read the logs and generate reports? Thanks in advance!...

  1. #1

    Default How can I tell at what times most of the updating is occurring?

    Hi,
    I need to know when the peak times are for updates/deletes/inserts.
    I have a series of binary logs.
    Is there a way to p these files to garner some indication of peak
    times?
    If so is there an elegant way of using 'mysqlbinlog' to do this?
    And/Or are there other programs out there that can read the logs and
    generate reports?


    Thanks in advance!

    tech101@gmail.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: How can I tell at what times most of the updating is occurring?

    >I need to know when the peak times are for updates/deletes/inserts. 

    What's a "time"? Time of day or duration to do the query?
     

    If you look at the format of mysqlbinlog output, you'll notice it puts
    a time stamp in a comment before each query. The query follows, although
    it may have extra stuff in it like setting the timestamp or last_insert_id.
    From this you could get the time-of-day of the queries.

    There's also exec_time which in my logs seems to always be 0. This
    might give useful info for the time-consuming queries if you can
    figure out what units it's in.
    Gordon Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: How can I tell at what times most of the updating is occurring?

    On Apr 13, 10:07 pm, org (Gordon Burditt) wrote: 
    >
    > What's a "time"? Time of day or duration to do the query?

    >
    > If you look at the format of mysqlbinlog output, you'll notice it puts
    > a time stamp in a comment before each query. The query follows, although
    > it may have extra stuff in it like setting the timestamp or last_insert_id.
    > From this you could get the time-of-day of the queries.
    >
    > There's also exec_time which in my logs seems to always be 0. This
    > might give useful info for the time-consuming queries if you can
    > figure out what units it's in.[/ref]

    Thanks for your answer! :)

    I noticed that the mysqlbinlog is kind of like the long-queries log,
    and there are datetimes like:
    #070412 18:55:33

    Just wondering if there is any programs/scripts that p the binlogs
    (or at least one) and produce report/s with stats on update traffic at
    certain times of the day?

    Thanks

    tech101@gmail.com Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: How can I tell at what times most of the updating is occurring?

    On Fri, 13 Apr 2007 12:07:40 -0000, Gordon Burditt wrote: 

    Fortnights sees semi-traditional for unnamed units of time. It might
    explain why none of the executions have rounded up to 1 yet. (;

    --
    Christian Biblical literalists are trusting themselves to an archaic English
    translation of a Latin translation of (help me here) Greek? Aramaic? source.
    I wouldn't even trust a VCR manual to make it through that intact. - Dr. Dee
    Peter Guest

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