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How to disable start of Xserver - Sun Solaris

Hi, how can i disable the start of the X server during boot time ? I have found noting inside init.d or rc?.d Frank --...

  1. #1

    Default How to disable start of Xserver

    Hi,


    how can i disable the start of the X server during boot time ?
    I have found noting inside init.d or rc?.d

    Frank
    --

    Frank Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    In article news.uni-berlin.de, Frank Zimmer <lu> writes: 

    man dtconfig

    /usr/dt/bin/dtconfig -d (disable auto-start)
    /usr/dt/bin/dtconfig -kill (kill dtlogin)


    ---
    \|/
    o o
    ___________________oOO_(_)_OOo____________________ __________________
    Florian Stiassny com


    Florian Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    dtconfig -d
    to start again
    dtlogin -e
    see man dtconfig

    George

    "Frank Zimmer" <lu> wrote in message
    news:bkrver$57vdm$news.uni-berlin.de... 


    george Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver


    Hi all,

    just : mv /etc/rc2.d/S99dtlogin /etc/rc2.d/s99dtlogin



    Damian




    "Frank Zimmer" <lu> a écrit dans le message de news:
    bkrver$57vdm$news.uni-berlin.de... 


    Damian Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver


    "Damian" <free.fr> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:3f741361$0$27034$free.fr...
     

    That's bad system administration (a hack).

    The proper (and Sun recommended in general) way to disable /etc/rc?.d/
    service(s) from starting is to do `mv /etc/rc2.d/S99dtlogin
    /etc/rc2.d/.S99dtlogin`.


    UNIX Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    UNIX admin <com> wrote:
     
     [/ref]
     

    Why is this a hack?
     

    Where is this style mentioned?

    --
    Darren Dunham com
    Unix System Administrator Taos - The SysAdmin Company
    Got some Dr Pepper? San Francisco, CA bay area
    < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >
    Darren Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    UNIX admin wrote: 

    This seems like a bad idea b/c it hides the file and would make it
    confusing for those who do an "ls" of the directory rather than
    an "ls -a".

    Personally, I usually add a "disable_" prefix. Because it's
    lowercase, all the disabled scripts show up at the end of the
    list.

    - Logan

    Logan Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    In article <3f787a5e$0$3654$sunrise.ch>,
    "UNIX admin" <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > That's bad system administration (a hack).
    >[/ref]

    Hack? Not really...
     

    Now that's a hack - the "accepted" way is to run dtconfig -d. But all
    that does is to S99dtlogin out of the /etc/rc*.d :).

    --
    Ken

    Real address krgray*at*verizon*dot*net
    Ken Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    In <3f787a5e$0$3654$sunrise.ch> "UNIX admin" <com> writes: 
    >
    >That's bad system administration (a hack).[/ref]

    for dtlogin you run dtconfig -d to disable, dtconfig -e to enable.
    renaming the rc script is a poor solution to this particular problem
    no matter which naming convention you choose.
    ultrasparc3@hotmail.com Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    "Darren Dunham" <taos.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:d__db.7656$news.prodigy.com... 
    > [/ref]

    >
    > Why is this a hack?[/ref]

    Because the most elegant thing to do is to put the "." in front, and also,
    it's uniform. But, you really should ask Sun about it. If they came up with
    it, then I presume they knew what they were doing.

    Personally, I have found of that this system works very well, especially
    when you need to disable a whole bunch of services all at once via a for
    loop in a shell. Perhaps that is why they chose it?

    This is what I mean:

    #!/bin/csh -f
    foreach i ( 0 1 s S 2 3 )
    find /etc/rc${i}.d/ >! /tmp/rc${i}
    end

    Now you just take out the services you want to leave ON with your favorite
    editor, the rest will be renamed; Then:

    #!/bin/csh -f
    foreach i ( `ls -1 /tmp/rc? )
    foreach j (`cat $i`)
    mv $j .$j # Here's your answer why
    end
    end
     
    >
    > Where is this style mentioned?[/ref]

    When in doubt, what does a good Solaris admin do? Why look at
    http://docs.sun.com of course!
    Also, in the past I used to subscribe to sun-managers and suns-at-home
    mailing lists. There are quite a few Sun/Solaris engineers on those. This is
    what they recommended. I trust the makers of Solaris to know what they are
    talking about; coupled with the above example, it shouldn't be too hard to
    figure out why they're doing it that way.

    Of course, you are free to choose whatever scheme you think is appropriate;
    but shouldn't every good admin strive to "admin clean" and therefore be
    closer to the goal of "having machines that admin themselves"?

    And another thing, which I find important, a lot of you here come from the
    trenches and have experince; but think of all the newbies, that also come
    here. Shouldn't they learn to think in terms of "clean admin" right from the
    beginning? It's all too easy to cook something up and get on your way. But
    if you do it right, you help someone understand the concept behind it. It
    may save them later.



    UNIX Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver


    "Ken Gray" <invalid> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:UD1eb.26721$gnilink.net... 

    Agreed. But wouldn't you agree that only works for `dtlogin` or, should we
    say, it's dtlogin specific. But you need a portable way to apply it
    uniformly across all the services you want to disable, all at once.


    UNIX Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver



    On Mon, 29 Sep 2003, UNIX admin wrote:
     
    >
    > That's bad system administration (a hack).[/ref]

    Hum, I have seen many ways that people turn theese off, this is just one
    style, otehrs include moving them to a subdir or dotting them like you
    say, neither is really good, the best way to shut down services is to
    unconfigure them properly.

    If you just rename or change them, a patch might reinstate them later on.
     

    There is to my knowledge no real "sun recommended way" to do that.
    When it comes to the Xserver, why not just unconfigure its start?

    i.e

    /usr/dt/bin/dtconfig -d

    /johan a
    Mr. Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    Mr. Johan Andersson wrote: 
    >>
    >>That's bad system administration (a hack).[/ref]
    >
    >
    > Hum, I have seen many ways that people turn theese off, this is just one
    > style, otehrs include moving them to a subdir or dotting them like you
    > say, neither is really good, the best way to shut down services is to
    > unconfigure them properly.[/ref]


    FWIW dtconfig -d just removes /etc/rc2.d/S99dtlogin

    --
    Tony


    Tony Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    UNIX admin <com> wrote: [/ref]
     

    That's exactly what I did, but my search was unsuccessful.

    Indeed the only references I could find in the administration collection
    suggest that the standard task is to simply remove the link (presumably
    on the idea that a copy remains in init.d and can be relinked).

    This is what 'dtconfig -d' does, and it's how accounting is disabled in
    this section.

    http://docs.sun.com/db/doc/805-7229/6j6q8svg4?a=view

    I was hoping that there was a section on general maintenance of startup
    scripts that I've overlooked in my search. If so, can you point it out
    to me?

    --
    Darren Dunham com
    Unix System Administrator Taos - The SysAdmin Company
    Got some Dr Pepper? San Francisco, CA bay area
    < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >
    Darren Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    "Damian" <free.fr> wrote in message news:<3f741361$0$27034$free.fr>... [/ref]
    Gurus,

    dtconfig is a shell script which does exactly the same as Damian
    mentioned above. Sometimes is good idea to get rid of a mythos! :-))

    Use a set -x option and check it yourself if you don't believe it.
    We ar talking about dtconfig -d and -e options only!

    --Jules
    kgyula@mailcity.com Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    In <3f795caa$0$3667$sunrise.ch> "UNIX admin" <com> writes: 
    .... 

    csh scripts and "admin clean" in the same post? is that the "do as I say
    and not as I do" form of proselytizing?
     

    such as not using csh for any sort of scripting. certainly not for
    examples that those with less experience may see and use without
    knowing any better. do you see any csh scripts in /etc/init.d?
    ultrasparc3@hotmail.com Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    <com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:prodigy.com... 

    Why not? If I were writing an /etc/init.d/ script, then I would most
    certainly use `sh`, abosolutely and without a doubt; but I'm not, and
    there's no need for Bourne shell in this particular case. Otherwise, there's
    nothing wrong with using (t)csh in day to day system administration. `csh`
    is included in Solaris by default anyway, and also in IRIX as well as HP-UX
    and AIX. Which makes it pretty portable. What is unclean in that example?
     

    Of course not, and there is a reason for that, and the reason is that on
    some systems, /usr may be on a separate partition which may not yet be
    mounted, so statically linked /sbin/sh is used, and also because Sun's own
    /etc/init.d/ scripts assume Bourne as the root's shell.

    However, the example I gave above was not an /etc/init.d/ script. It was a
    one time shot.


    UNIX Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver

    In <3f7aefe4$0$3673$sunrise.ch> "UNIX admin" <com> writes: 

    using csh.

    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/unix-faq/shell/csh-whynot/
    ultrasparc3@hotmail.com Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: How to disable start of Xserver


    <com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:prodigy.com... 
    <com> writes: 
    >
    > using csh.
    >
    > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/unix-faq/shell/csh-whynot/[/ref]

    Well well, don't that look purty and knowledge-like. That FAQ even looks
    like the author knows what he's talking about.
    Luckily, it just so happens I know Bourne and Korn shells pretty good if not
    better than (t)csh. And let me tell you, the author of that FAQ's full of
    it. And BTW, most of my production scripts are written in Korn shell.

    Yes, you have to do hoops with file descriptors in (t)csh. But it can be
    done. You just have to know your shell. From your other shell. Or you could
    just be a real admin and know all four of them.


    UNIX Guest

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