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iMovie flexibility - Mac Applications & Software

Is it true that an iMovie project is either PAL or NTSC, and I cannot have a project in any other size? If I add still frames at resolutions 1200x900 to iMovie, and in the end export to Quicktime at 1200x900, will these frames have been reduce to PAL size and then expanded again, losing some resolution in the process?...

  1. #1

    Default iMovie flexibility

    Is it true that an iMovie project is either PAL or NTSC, and I cannot
    have a project in any other size? If I add still frames at resolutions
    1200x900 to iMovie, and in the end export to Quicktime at 1200x900,
    will these frames have been reduce to PAL size and then expanded again,
    losing some resolution in the process?
    Philo Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    In article <280820031429079688%com>, Philo D
    <com> wrote:
     

    Yes. iMovie is an inexpensive consumer video editing product intended
    to be used with standard camcorders. It is not intended to be used at
    professional resolutions.

    --
    Jerry Kindall, Seattle, WA <http://www.jerrykindall.com/>

    When replying by e-mail, use plain text ONLY to make sure I read it.
    Due to spam and viruses, I filter all mail with HTML or attachments.
    Jerry Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    I just started using iMovie so could you tell me it's default
    resolution? I assume it's 640x480. I assume that the resolutions for
    VHS and regular 480i standard TV is not greater than iMovies' resolution
    so there will be no loss of resolution on importing into iMovie?

    Since standard TV (480i) and VHS are interlaced, I assume that their
    actual resolution is half 640x480. Is that correct?

    Is there a reasonable book out there for iMovie beginners? There are
    some on Amazon.com - any recommendation? Searching through iMovie's
    online help is a hassle.

    thanks


    George Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    In article <com>,
    George <com> wrote:
     

    The resolution is 720x480. As iMovie is based on DV, it uses the
    rectangular pixels DV requires (W = .9 x H). So that's 648x480 square
    pixels. If you import still images, you can use 640x480 or any other
    size that has the same 4x3 aspect ratio. iMovie will convert to the
    size it needs.
     

    Don't think of it that way. NTSC uses 60 interlaced (half) frames per
    second. But iMovie presents everything in terms of 30 full frames. So
    when you work in iMovie, you'll see 30 frames for each second of video.
    (It's actually 29.97, but don't sweat that.) Interlacing is handled for
    you and should be transparent to you.
     

    I found iMovie: The Missing Manual a reasonable intro. It spends a lot
    of time talking about movie making. As I was using iMovie to make music
    videos using existing footage, that part of the book wasn't of
    significant interest. But it told me the few things I didn't figure out
    just by experimenting.

    --
    Hank Shiffman http://www.disordered.org
    Have Opinion, Will Travel org
    Mountain View, California
    Hank Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    In article <fu-berlin.de>,
    Hank Shiffman <org> wrote:
     
    >
    > I found iMovie: The Missing Manual a reasonable intro. It spends a lot
    > of time talking about movie making. As I was using iMovie to make music
    > videos using existing footage, that part of the book wasn't of
    > significant interest. But it told me the few things I didn't figure out
    > just by experimenting.[/ref]

    I like iMovie: Visual QuickStart by jeff Carlson even better. Covered
    all the same things as the Missing Manual, but used fewer words, making
    it a better "Missing Manual" IMHO.

    --
    Chicago, IL
    Remove "GO" to reply.
    Phil Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    Thanks, for the advice. One more question: using Formac's Studio to
    digitize VHS tapes will I lose any resolution by going through iMovie to
    make QT movies or DVD's? I assume not but you said VHS was 720x480
    while iMovie is 640x480 (rectangular to square pixels or something like
    that?). Is there much resolution lost in the conversion? I have a lot
    of tapes to do and don't want to redo with a higher end app later if I
    find that iMovie has caused a noticeable loss of resolution.

    thanks again.
     

    I'll get the book as you recommended!

    George Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    In article <com>,
    George <com> wrote:
     

    There's some loss of quality in any conversion. When I first started
    playing with music videos, I used a Formac Studio to capture the video
    from DVDs. There were noticeable differences in quality between the
    original footage and what I produced with iMovie, although it was still
    awfully good.

    You can see the difference between capturing DVD footage via A/D and
    directly on my website. The description starts here:

    http://www.disordered.org/Video.html#Wonderful

    Also, be aware that a bug in iMovie 3 will prevent you from capturing
    sound using a Formac Studio. The video will transfer but not the audio;
    you'll just get a lot of nasty buzzing. There's a shareware app called
    BTV Carbon that can get around the problem; use it instead of iMovie to
    capture the video as DV and then drop the files into iMovie.

    --
    Hank Shiffman http://www.disordered.org
    Have Opinion, Will Travel org
    Mountain View, California
    Hank Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    Hank,
    Thanks for all the suggestions - they're great.

    I looked at your web site and noticed that you mentioned 0. I agree
    that it does a great job of grabbing stuff off a DVD. However, I
    haven't been able to figure how to get the .VOB file output from 0
    into a mpeg format of some sort that QT or iMovie will recognize. I saw
    on the web that an app called ffmpegX will do it but I've yet to figure
    out how to get it to work. Thanks again.
     

    George Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    In article <com>,
    George <com> wrote:
     

    George,

    There are two approaches I've used for converting an MPEG-2 file (the
    ..VOB) to DV for iMovie. The first is to get licenses for Quicktime Pro
    and Quicktime MPEG-2 support. With both pieces in place, Quicktime
    Player will now be able to open a .VOB file and export a DV file.

    The free alternative is called DiVA, which can open .VOB files and
    output to most anything Quicktime supports (including DV). You may
    still need the Quicktime Pro license. It has some interesting options,
    including the ability to crop and rescale video during the transcoding
    process.

    Good luck!
    Hank

    --
    Hank Shiffman http://www.disordered.org
    Have Opinion, Will Travel org
    Mountain View, California
    Hank Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: iMovie flexibility

    George <com> wrote in message news:<com>... 

    This is a bit of a misnomer. NTSC, PAL, and SECAM do not really have one
    horizontal resolution. NTSC nominally has 525 lines, while PAL and SECAM
    have 625 lines. However, some of these lines don't show on the screen and
    are used for closed captioning, etc.

    However, none of the standards has one meaningful horizontal resolution.
    Resolution is related in a signal to bandwidth. NTSC breaks the signal up
    into three axes, a luminosity axis, a Green/Yellow axis, and a Red/Blue axis.
    Each axis has a different bandwidth and therefore represents a different
    "resolution." Based on the actual colors in a line, you can get anywhere from
    around 700 distinct horizontal features to not much more than 200 per line.

    Various technologies like S-video ameliorate this problem somewhat by
    separating the luminosity axis (actually an axis between a washed-out blue
    and black) from the two chroma axes, but only if you are using an S-video
    connection.

    PAL also has three axes, but they're different. PAL is somewhat better than
    NTSC. Of course, the drawback to PAL is that it's 50 rather than 60 frames
    per second, which actually does make a difference in perception of flicker.

    The upshot of all of this is that the utlimate quality of the image is going
    to be way more dependent on the color filters used by the software when
    producing the final image than on any minutiae like converting between
    720 and 640 pixels. In my experience, the filters in iMovie and iDVD are
    gorgeous for televisions.

    Also, practically, any video source from VHS is going to be of substantially
    lower than half the quality iMovie and iDVD can deal with, so it isn't worth
    worrying about.
    Eric Guest

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