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IS and heartbeat - Photography

This may seem like a strange one, but... would Image Stabilization (as implemented, say, by Canon in their 17-85 EF-S) deal with the movement seen when your heart is beating very noticeably? I ask this because I bring cameras with me on bike rides, and will often have been riding up a very steep hill at very high effort, and if the moment strikes to take a picture, my heart will not have had enough time to settle back into my chest and I can visibly feel (and see) the results when I'm holding the camera. Thanks- --Mike-- Chain Reaction ...

  1. #1

    Default IS and heartbeat

    This may seem like a strange one, but... would Image Stabilization (as
    implemented, say, by Canon in their 17-85 EF-S) deal with the movement seen
    when your heart is beating very noticeably?

    I ask this because I bring cameras with me on bike rides, and will often
    have been riding up a very steep hill at very high effort, and if the moment
    strikes to take a picture, my heart will not have had enough time to settle
    back into my chest and I can visibly feel (and see) the results when I'm
    holding the camera.

    Thanks-

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com



    Mike Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    On Wed, 02 Feb 2005 17:29:20 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
    <netcom.com> wrote:
     
    I beleive it would definitely help. The slowest shutter you could get
    away with might be a little faster than it would be if you cooled down
    first, but without the IS you would still need two stops faster.




    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a

    Entering your freshman dorm for the first time, and seeing
    an axe head come through the door on your right.
    Rodney Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    >>This may seem like a strange one, but... would Image Stabilization (as 
    > I beleive it would definitely help. The slowest shutter you could get
    > away with might be a little faster than it would be if you cooled down
    > first, but without the IS you would still need two stops faster.[/ref]

    Might be worthwhile for me to try and rent an image stabilizing lens to see,
    as the IS units are a bit heavier and obviously more expensive. Plus, it's
    probably one of those things where you don't get as much respect using one
    (do "real" pros use IS lenses? Of course they probably do, given appropriate
    conditions, but I'll bet many people see them as a crutch for poor
    technique).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    Mike Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    On Fri, 04 Feb 2005 05:43:01 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
    <netcom.com> wrote:
     

    Real pros who shoot sports use IS lenses, they need every bit of edge
    they can get to stop the action and get a crisp shot. I shoot
    horses[1], and every equine photographer I know uses an IS lens if
    they can afford one.

    jc

    [1] No, not that kind, not even this kind either:

    <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065088/quotes>


    JC Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    JC Dill wrote: 
    >
    > Real pros who shoot sports use IS lenses, they need every bit of edge
    > they can get to stop the action and get a crisp shot. I shoot
    > horses[1], and every equine photographer I know uses an IS lens if
    > they can afford one.
    >
    > jc
    >
    > [1] No, not that kind, not even this kind either:
    >
    > <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065088/quotes>[/ref]

    A little trick I figgered out all by myself one day while using a
    monopod at an airshow... I had been using the 'pod to get some shots of
    aircraft taxiing by when another aircraft flew overhead - without time
    to remove the 'pod so I could aim high, I just picked it up off the
    ground still attached to the camera; it's weight acted to minimize
    smaller jiggles. Though it changed the whole balance of the camera and
    telephoto lens, I found it quite easy to compensate after a few shots.
    Retracting the leg made it more manouverable and limited casualties
    amongst folks nearby... ;^)

    I've also had success just leaving my Slik ball head attached to the
    camera - much smaller, but still massive enough to provide greatly
    smoothed panning.

    Bob ^,,^


    Bob Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    In article <FXDMd.367$news.prodigy.net>, mikej1
    ix.netcom.com says... 

    I don't think anyone sees them as such. In low-light conditions, or
    conditions that don't allow use of a tripod, they're a must.

    Additionally, the longer IS lenses help dampen vibration caused by the
    shutter of the camera - very useful, I'm told.
    Brian Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    Hi Mike,

    I.S. is always a help but to tell you the truth, with the 17 to 85 lens it
    is not so significant as when using a telephoto of long length. At 17mm
    the shake is far less of a problem than at say, 200mm.
    Ironman ken.


    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:Q58Md.1361$news.prodigy.net... 


    IMKen Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    > I.S. is always a help but to tell you the truth, with the 17 to 85 lens it 

    Ken: I was figuring it (IS) would be irrelevant at shorter focal lengths,
    but I've noticed on my lowly Olympus 5050, at an effective focal length of
    only 100mm, I could use a bit of help when the heart is pounding. The
    effective focal length of the long end of the 17-85 is 135mm.

    Ideally, I'd love a compact 17-125 (which would be about 28-100 equivalent).
    And, of course, I'd want IS with that. And F3.5 throughout its range. And
    fast focusing. And affordable. Yeah, that's it. Is that too much to ask?
    :>)

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "IMKen" <rr.com> wrote in message
    news:W_VMd.6071$socal.rr.com... 
    >
    >[/ref]


    Mike Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    Mike Jacoubowsky <netcom.com> wrote:
     

    Maybe a bit much. Canon does make a 28-135 f3.5/5.6 IS and a
    17-85 f4-5.6 IS though. Better offering than Nikon, anyway, sadly.

    --
    Ken Tough
    Ken Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    >> (do "real" pros use IS lenses? Of course they probably do, given 
    >
    > I don't think anyone sees them as such. In low-light conditions, or
    > conditions that don't allow use of a tripod, they're a must.[/ref]

    Interestingly, a professional photographer whose work I admire very much
    (Graham Baxter, www.GrahamBaxter.com) feels that they're entirely useless,
    at least the Nikon VR versions. I found this very surprising, given that he
    shoots from the back of a motorcycle during bicycle races. I would have
    thought that something that would dampen the effect of bumps etc would have
    been beneficial, but he doesn't just dislike them, he hates them. But, he
    did qualify it by saying that his only experiences were with Nikon equipment
    (he's a full Nikon kind of guy).
     

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    IMBA, BikesBelong, NBDA member

    "Brian Baird" <right> wrote in message
    news:verizon.net... 
    >
    > I don't think anyone sees them as such. In low-light conditions, or
    > conditions that don't allow use of a tripod, they're a must.
    >
    > Additionally, the longer IS lenses help dampen vibration caused by the
    > shutter of the camera - very useful, I'm told.[/ref]


    Mike Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    On Fri, 04 Feb 2005 22:51:13 GMT, Brian Baird <right> wrote:
     
    >
    >I don't think anyone sees them as such. In low-light conditions, or
    >conditions that don't allow use of a tripod, they're a must.
    >
    >Additionally, the longer IS lenses help dampen vibration caused by the
    >shutter of the camera - very useful, I'm told.[/ref]

    They (IS or VR lenses) are lighter and cheaper than a 2-stop larger
    aperture lens of the same focal length, so if subject motion doesn't
    require the faster shutter the big lens would allow, and you can't use
    a tripod, the conclusion is clear. It has nothing to do with
    technique, but rather what sort of shot you want to get, under what
    conditions.

    Have you priced an F/2.8 400-mm lately?
    Lifted One?


    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


    Ask not with whom the buck stops . . .
    Rodney Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    In article <ijdNd.811$news.prodigy.net>,
    com says... 
    >
    > Interestingly, a professional photographer whose work I admire very much
    > (Graham Baxter, www.GrahamBaxter.com) feels that they're entirely useless,
    > at least the Nikon VR versions. I found this very surprising, given that he
    > shoots from the back of a motorcycle during bicycle races. I would have
    > thought that something that would dampen the effect of bumps etc would have
    > been beneficial, but he doesn't just dislike them, he hates them. But, he
    > did qualify it by saying that his only experiences were with Nikon equipment
    > (he's a full Nikon kind of guy).[/ref]

    That's bizarre... or he's expecting miracles from IS.

    Considering performance of the IS lens with IS off is almost identical
    to a standard lens, it makes you wonder why he would be annoyed for
    having the option. It also makes you wonder if he did A/B comparisons
    of IS on and IS off.
    Brian Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
    [] 

    It shows an interesting choice, though. On my Panasonic FZ20 I have a
    432mm equivalent f/2.8 VR/IS lens light enough to hold in one hand.
    Entire camera is a few hundred dollars. Obviously it's not doing the same
    job as the SLR lens, but for some purposes it's quite close.

    Cheers,
    David


    David Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles wrote:
     

    From the back of a motorcycle the vibration level (frequency and
    possibly amplitude) may be outside the range of control of the VR
    system. If that occurs then the VR not only can't 'damp' out the
    vibrations but could actually make things worse. (Perhaps the VR (and
    IS) systems detect out of range conditions and stop trying too).


    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    >>Ideally, I'd love a compact 17-125 (which would be about 28-100 
    >
    > Maybe a bit much. Canon does make a 28-135 f3.5/5.6 IS and a
    > 17-85 f4-5.6 IS though. Better offering than Nikon, anyway, sadly.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Tough[/ref]

    Do I even want to look up the cost of the 28-135? Nah, no need. It would
    overlap the range of the 17-85 by too much. On the other hand, you could
    always use an inexpensive prime wideangle lens, or even a non-IS zoom of
    perhaps 17-40 or so, along with the 28-135.... yeah, that's the ticket! But
    then you're up there in $$$ plus too much to haul around on a bicycle (that
    you're trying to keep light so you can keep up with everyone else).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    Mike Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: IS and heartbeat

    In article <t%BNd.1752$news.prodigy.net>, mikej1
    ix.netcom.com says... 

    It isn't very expensive. You should be able to find it for about $400
    new.
    Brian Guest

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