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Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says? - ASP Database

I can't find a list of Access keywords in the Access help file and I can't find anything about "name". Is it really a keyword? ASPFAQ #2241 uses "name" for a field name and that example works fine on Access 2000 when I tried it. Is "name" still a keyword in Access 2000+ ? Thanks, Mike...

  1. #1

    Default Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    I can't find a list of Access keywords in the Access help file and I
    can't find anything about "name". Is it really a keyword? ASPFAQ
    #2241 uses "name" for a field name and that example works fine on
    Access 2000 when I tried it. Is "name" still a keyword in Access
    2000+ ?

    Thanks,
    Mike
    Mike Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    http://www.aspfaq.com/show.asp?id=2080

    Bob Lehmann

    "Mike" <com> wrote in message
    news:google.com... 


    Bob Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Circular reference

    "Bob Lehmann" <zzz> wrote in message
    news:phx.gbl... 
    >
    >[/ref]


    Ray Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Sorry Ray, my humor recognition component isn't responding today :>).

    IOW - I don't get what you mean???

    Bob Lehmann

    "Ray at <%=sLocation%> [MVP]" <myfirstname at lane34 dot com> wrote in
    message news:phx.gbl... 
    > >
    > >[/ref]
    >
    >[/ref]


    Bob Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    You pointed him to the same article he had in question. The title says
    it's about FAQ 2080 & you said to read 2080. Thus you refereed him back
    to the same article he came from.

    Bob Lehmann wrote:
     
    >>[/ref]
    >
    >[/ref]

    joker Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Well the following Microsoft articles list the reserved words for Access
    2000 & 2002 respectively.

    209187 ACC2000: List of reserved words in Access 2000
    286335 ACC2002: Reserved Words in Microsoft Access

    You can get these over at http://support.microsoft.com

    Mike wrote:
     

    joker Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Sorry, I guess I'm not in the habit of getting all of my details from the
    subject line.

    Bob Lehmann

    "joker" <com> wrote in message
    news:phx.gbl... 
    > >
    > >[/ref]
    >[/ref]


    Bob Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Some people just don't know enough to post all the details in the body
    with a brief description that is also included in the body for the subject.

    That of course would make sense, which is why people don't do it. At
    least that's my guess.

    Bob Lehmann wrote:
     [/ref]
    >
    >[/ref]

    joker Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Agreed!

    Subject: How do I....
    Body: submit two forms at once

    Arg! Nothing I hate more than the "suspenseful" subject lines.

    Ray at home



    "Bob Lehmann" <zzz> wrote in message
    news:%phx.gbl... 


    Ray Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Once again Mr Ray add bull to groups. And it is not his first time.
    Please Mr. Ray, try to contribute your first valuable reply and be helpfull.
    We know that there are a lot of aasholes in the world like you. Don't try to
    remember us.
    John.


    "Ray at <%=sLocation%> [MVP]" <myfirstname at lane34 dot com> schreef in
    bericht news:phx.gbl... [/ref]
    the 
    >
    >[/ref]


    John Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    What about the ones where the subject is the entire message?

    Bob

    "Ray at <%=sLocation%> [MVP]" <myfirstname at lane34 dot com> wrote in
    message news:phx.gbl... [/ref]
    the 
    >
    >[/ref]


    Bob Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Mike wrote: 
    While "name" works in Access, it may fail when used in ueries against other
    databases. Remember, ODBC and OLEDB are used with more databases than simply
    Access.

    Best practice is to avoid words that are used for builtin function, object
    and property names. If you look in the VBA reference, you will find the word
    "Name" used as property names and a statement name. Jet (Access) queries can
    utilize VBA functions, so think about creating a query containing both a
    field with the same name as a VBA function, and a call to that function.
    Confusion galore! Avoid reserved keywords when naming your database objects.

    In addition, think about having to maintain this database two years from
    now: are you really going to be able to quickly distinguish among all the
    fields in your database dalled "name"? Wouldn't it make more sense to
    somebody looking at it from the outsid to have fields called "statname",
    "mininame", "gamename", etc.? It certainly would have helped me figure out
    your database.

    Bob Barrows

    --
    Microsoft MVP - ASP/ASP.NET
    Please reply to the newsgroup. This email account is my spam trap so I
    don't check it very often. If you must reply off-line, then remove the
    "NO SPAM"


    Bob Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    For example, "name" appears here:
    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=209187

    Just because the version you're using allows you to use it, doesn't mean you
    should.

    --
    http://www.aspfaq.com/
    (Reverse address to reply.)




    "joker" <com> wrote in message
    news:#phx.gbl... 
    >[/ref]


    Aaron Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Like Bob said: i always use tblTable (tbl befor the tablename) and fldName
    (fdl before the field) or in case of the field: userName, userAddress what
    make it more readable when you have also cityName in another table.
    John.


    John Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    "Bob Barrows [MVP]" <SPAMcom> wrote in message news:<phx.gbl>... 
    > While "name" works in Access, it may fail when used in ueries against other
    > databases. Remember, ODBC and OLEDB are used with more databases than simply
    > Access.
    >[/ref]

    "name" is only checked on the list
    http://www.aspfaq.com/show.asp?id=2080
    for Access, which was why I thought it was weird that it seemed to
    work fine in Access
     

    What is VBA? is that visual basic for access?

    What you say makes sense
     

    I would really like to see a naming convention FAQ entry, I looked for
    it several times but never found one. The authors of "SQL Queries for
    Mere Mortals" used this kind of thing throughout the book:

    RECIPE_CLASSES
    RecipeClassID
    RecipeClassDescription

    RECIPES
    RecipeID
    RecipeTitle
    RecipeClassID
    Preparation
    Notes

    Note that the primary and foreign keys use the same name. I thought
    that was pretty dumb, but later he was talking about the USING
    statement, and then I realized that can be pretty cool (because you
    can do USING (RecipeClassID) instead of typing out the expression)
    Unfortunately from experimenting with Access it doesn't seem like
    USING is implemented yet.

    When I started my database I had read
    http://www.aspfaq.com/show.asp?id=2241 and thought that making the
    table name singular so you can do stuff like "artist.id =
    album.artist_id " was pretty intuitive (btw that article is full of
    ..name)

    An article on ASPFAQ.com that explains good naming conventions and
    gives some logic for them would be really cool.

    -Mike
    Mike Guest

  16. #16

    Default Those have got to be my favorite!

    Ray at home

    "Bob Lehmann" <zzz> wrote in message
    news:%phx.gbl... [/ref]
    > the 
    > >
    > >[/ref]
    >
    >[/ref]


    Ray Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    Mike wrote: 
    >> While "name" works in Access, it may fail when used in ueries
    >> against other
    >> databases. Remember, ODBC and OLEDB are used with more databases
    >> than simply
    >> Access.
    >>[/ref]
    >
    > "name" is only checked on the list
    > http://www.aspfaq.com/show.asp?id=2080
    > for Access, which was why I thought it was weird that it seemed to
    > work fine in Access.[/ref]

    "Name" is on the list because it is used in VBA (Visual Basic For
    Applications).

    Words do not appear on the list because they will automatically cause a
    failure if the word is used. They are on the list because they are used in
    internal code, and thus have the possibility of causing a failure at some
    point.

     
    >
    > What is VBA? is that visual basic for access?[/ref]

    See above
    VBA comes in several flavors: VBA for Access, VBA for Word, etc. Each is a
    superset of VB that includes methods and properties that are specific for
    the Office application it was written for.
     
    >
    > I would really like to see a naming convention FAQ entry, I looked for
    > it several times but never found one. The authors of "SQL Queries for
    > Mere Mortals" used this kind of thing throughout the book:
    >
    > RECIPE_CLASSES
    > RecipeClassID
    > RecipeClassDescription
    >
    > RECIPES
    > RecipeID
    > RecipeTitle
    > RecipeClassID
    > Preparation
    > Notes
    >
    > Note that the primary and foreign keys use the same name. I thought
    > that was pretty dumb, but later he was talking about the USING
    > statement, and then I realized that can be pretty cool (because you
    > can do USING (RecipeClassID) instead of typing out the expression)
    > Unfortunately from experimenting with Access it doesn't seem like
    > USING is implemented yet.[/ref]

    No it isn't, and is unlikely to be given the deprecation of the Jet engine.
    It is not implemented in Transact-SQL (SQL Server's version of SQL) yet
    either.
     

    It's tough to write an article on something that can be so personal to code
    authors. The main criteria to keep in mind when designing a naming
    convention is:
    1. Prevent the use of reserved keywords
    2. Use it consistently

    All other criteria (using prefixes to denote object type or use, suffixes,
    etc.) are secondary. It's a case of "do what works for you", unless you are
    working in a team development environment, in which case the team comes up
    with the rules to use.

    Bob Barrows


    --
    Microsoft MVP - ASP/ASP.NET
    Please reply to the newsgroup. This email account is my spam trap so I
    don't check it very often. If you must reply off-line, then remove the
    "NO SPAM"


    Bob Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    > It's tough to write an article on something that can be so personal to code 

    "Do what works for you" is only valid if you know what you are doing.
    While its true that professionals don't need to be told how to name
    things, newbies like me that are left to invent their own naming
    convention will do so without consideration of all the different
    implications that a pro is aware of (i.e., I didn't know about USING,
    I didn't know that my variable names made it hard for others to read,
    I didn't know about Hungarian Notation, I didn't know in the beginning
    that singular table names make more sense than plural ones, I didn't
    know about reserved keywords, etc..., I don't know whether using
    underscores or capsLikeThis is more commonly used for separating
    words, etc...) I had no idea my code was hard to follow because of my
    naming scheme until you pointed it out. Actually I am still unclear
    about how I should change it. I would like to see an article explain
    a couple different coding styles that are commonly used (there can't
    be THAT many!) and the pros and cons of each, and a disclaimer at the
    top that says "this article is geared for guiding newbies" or
    something like that.
    -Mike
    Mike Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    So, did you try to drive a car without first educating yourself?
    Oh, nobody told me about the brake! Waaahhhh! nobody told me what a yield
    sign means. How was I supposed to know you're supposed to check the oil?

    It's not like there isn't a wealth of information at your fingertips. You
    have heard of the Internet, haven't you? Does the name Google ring a bell?

    That's the problem with most newbie whining; They fail to first learn the
    basics, and instead try to take on the world with questions like "How do I
    create an ASP page that duplicates Hot Mail?"

    Grow up, stop whining and build a foundation consisting of the basics.

    Bob Lehmann

    "Mike" <com> wrote in message
    news:google.com... [/ref]
    code [/ref]
    suffixes, [/ref]
    are [/ref]
    up 
    >
    > "Do what works for you" is only valid if you know what you are doing.
    > While its true that professionals don't need to be told how to name
    > things, newbies like me that are left to invent their own naming
    > convention will do so without consideration of all the different
    > implications that a pro is aware of (i.e., I didn't know about USING,
    > I didn't know that my variable names made it hard for others to read,
    > I didn't know about Hungarian Notation, I didn't know in the beginning
    > that singular table names make more sense than plural ones, I didn't
    > know about reserved keywords, etc..., I don't know whether using
    > underscores or capsLikeThis is more commonly used for separating
    > words, etc...) I had no idea my code was hard to follow because of my
    > naming scheme until you pointed it out. Actually I am still unclear
    > about how I should change it. I would like to see an article explain
    > a couple different coding styles that are commonly used (there can't
    > be THAT many!) and the pros and cons of each, and a disclaimer at the
    > top that says "this article is geared for guiding newbies" or
    > something like that.
    > -Mike[/ref]


    Bob Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Is "name" really a reserved Access keyword as ASPFAQ #2080 says?

    "Bob Lehmann" <zzz> wrote in message news:<phx.gbl>... 

    There are certainly bits and pieces out there, and I've certainly
    encountered them over time, but what I am talking about is a
    trustworthy doent that brings all those bits and pieces together.
    If you know of a page that discusses this very topic (a doent, not
    a forum scrap that some random person posted), please post it and I
    will check them out.
    Mike Guest

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