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Which .iso files do i download and burn onto a cd?...

  1. #1

    Default .iso

    Which .iso files do i download and burn onto a cd?

    bertybadboy Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: .iso

    bertybadboy <com> writes:
     

    I think this is a FAQ more or less, but anyway - for a 'normal' install,
    with base system and a reasonable helping of the most popular packages,
    what you need is a -disc1.iso (which comes in two flavors in 4.11 - kde
    and gnome respectively - and I think tihs will also be the case for 5.n
    releases from 5.4 onwards). disc2 is traditionally the live filesystem,
    while miniinst is for a minimal install.

    --
    Peter N. M. Hansteen, member of the first RFC 1149 implementation team
    http://www.blug.linux.no/rfc1149/ http://www.datadok.no/ http://www.nuug.no/
    "First, we kill all the spammers" The Usenet Bard, "Twice-forwarded tales"

    Peter Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: .iso

    bertybadboy wrote: 

    I was all set with a big explanation of what the ISOs were, and
    to complain that there wasn't a nice, easy to find, concise
    description in the handbook, when I actually looked for it and
    found it with no problem.

    The place to start, of course, when installing FreeBSD is Chapter
    Two in the handbook, entitled, appropriately enough, "Installing
    FreeBSD":

    http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install.html

    As part of section 2.2, "Pre-installation Tasks", there is section
    2.2.6 "Obtain the FreeBSD Installation Files". And it points you to
    section 2.13 "Preparing Your Own Installation Media":

    http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install-diff-media.html

    And that has an excellent and concise description of the ISO files.

    The gist of that is you should download the -miniinst version (not
    the -mini version as described in the handbook) if you have a fast
    internet connection and want to install the packages online, or
    the -disc1 version if you want to have a CD with it prepackage. The
    biggest advantage to using the miniinst version is that you are
    sure to get the latest version of the package, while the -disc1
    version is what was available when the ISO was created.

    Hope this helps.

    --
    Jonathan Arnold (mailto:org)
    Daemon Dancing in the Dark, a FreeBSD weblog:
    http://freebsd.amazingdev.com/blog/

    Jonathan Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: .iso

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 09:23:03 -0400
    Jonathan Arnold <org> wrote:
     
    >
    > I was all set with a big explanation of what the ISOs were, and
    > to complain that there wasn't a nice, easy to find, concise
    > description in the handbook, when I actually looked for it and
    > found it with no problem.
    >
    > The place to start, of course, when installing FreeBSD is Chapter
    > Two in the handbook, entitled, appropriately enough, "Installing
    > FreeBSD":
    >
    > http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install.html
    >
    > As part of section 2.2, "Pre-installation Tasks", there is section
    > 2.2.6 "Obtain the FreeBSD Installation Files". And it points you to
    > section 2.13 "Preparing Your Own Installation Media":
    >
    > http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install-diff-media.html
    >
    > And that has an excellent and concise description of the ISO files.
    >
    > The gist of that is you should download the -miniinst version (not
    > the -mini version as described in the handbook) if you have a fast
    > internet connection and want to install the packages online, or
    > the -disc1 version if you want to have a CD with it prepackage. The
    > biggest advantage to using the miniinst version is that you are
    > sure to get the latest version of the package, while the -disc1
    > version is what was available when the ISO was created.[/ref]

    The original poster didn't say which version he wanted to install
    but I would presume its something very recent. I think that
    information is good for anything prior to 5.4 but it seems to be
    changing somewhat starting with the 5.4-RC1. From the announcement
    ( http://docs.freebsd.org/cgi/mid.cgi?20050405144935.GA54439 ):

    "The layout of the installation CDs is slightly different than previous
    releases. The disc1 image should be used to start the install. It
    contains a "live filesystem" and the set of packages that normally get
    installed as part of a minimal install (perl, the baseline Xorg
    windowing system, and on i386 the base Linux emulation package). The
    disc2 image contains a larger variety of packages (kde3, gnome2, etc)
    that can be installed while doing the initial installation of the
    machine, but if you just want to do a minimal install disc1 should be
    all you need."

    I gather that the miniinst.iso won't be available as a separate iso
    since its essentially now -disc1. I like the idea of a base install
    and live filesystem on the same disc. However, it appears that
    someone wanting to do a fresh install with KDE/Gnome/etc will now
    need to download both -disc1 and -disc2. Its more to download but
    the selection of packages on the CDs is probably larger.

    If I am misreading the announcement I'm sure someone will correct
    me.

    Hope this helps more than confuses!

    Randy
    --
    Randy Guest

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