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Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography - Photography

In article <37IRa.85660$H17.26827sccrnsc02>, not says...  You are absolutely correct. Reading a JPG causes no quality loss whatsoever.   Right again. If you save in-camera as a JPG, then edit the image for printing, you need to save in a lossless format to avoid yet another generation of JPG compression. -- ________________________________ Todd Walker http://twalker.d2g.com Olympus E20 Canon G2 My Digital Photography Weblog: http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm _________________________________...

  1. #1

    Default Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography

    In article <37IRa.85660$H17.26827sccrnsc02>, not
    says... 

    You are absolutely correct. Reading a JPG causes no quality loss
    whatsoever.
     

    Right again. If you save in-camera as a JPG, then edit the image for
    printing, you need to save in a lossless format to avoid yet another
    generation of JPG compression.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Olympus E20
    Canon G2
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
    Todd Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography

    From a visual perspective, how do I know if I've "lost" something? I
    mean, I understand the concept from a data perspective, but
    photographically speaking, what am I looking for?

    Working with my jpeg's, I change their sizes, brightness, sharpness,
    etc..and my prints look terrific (at least to my eyes). Perhaps I
    should leave well enough alone?

    JC

    JunkMonkey wrote: 
    >
    > same

    >
    >
    >[/ref]

    Jeffrey Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography

    > From a visual perspective, how do I know if I've "lost" something? I 

    You are typically looking for:
    1) less details in the image - in the sense that the image gets smoother
    2) fewer colours (don't know if jpeg does this)

    I think the JPEG standard is designed with the human eye in mind, so that
    the image attributes least noticeable by the eye are the ones removed
    (filtered).

    Regards, Magnus



    MA Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography

    Jeffrey Cohen <ca> wrote in
    news:ca:
     

    For "everyday" photography you will not gain anything. But set your JPEG
    quality to the highest that your camera provides and turn in-camera
    sharpening off, as you do that yourself after all the edits.

    --
    Matti Vuori, <http://sivut.koti.soon.fi/mvuori/index-e.htm>

    Matti Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography

    In message <ca>,
    Jeffrey Cohen <ca> wrote:
     

    The Tiffs will be slightly better quality, but they will tie up the
    camera for a long time after you take the shots. I really don't think
    TIFFs are worth shooting if they're only 8-bit per channel. The only
    difference is the lack of JPEG compression, which is very slight if you
    use the highest-quality JPEG setting.

    If the TIFFs were 16-bit per channel, then you'd really have something
    extra to work with.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <komm> 
    JPS@no.komm Guest

  6. #6

    Default In camera sharpening (Was Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography)

    In article <229.0.31>,
    soon.fi says... 

    I've seen this mentioned around here a few times and understand the reasons
    for it, but I'm a little confused about whether my camera allows this. I have
    the Canon A40 and one of the options on the "Photo Effects" menu is "Low
    Sharpening". Should I be turning this on, or does this have a different
    affect?

    -Doug
    Doug Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: In camera sharpening (Was Re: Jpeg vs. Tiff in everyday photography)


    "Doug A. Foster" <endjunk.com> wrote in message
    news:cis.dfn.de...
    SNIP 
    reasons 
    have 

    You need to set it to low sharpening. It is no, or the least amount of,
    sharpening. It won't deteriorate the raw quality, but allows you to apply
    sharpening (type and amount) with a photo editor after all other
    manipulation.

    Bart


    Bart Guest

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