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Lighting conditions for viewing prints - Adobe Photoshop Elements

The colour and density of prints produced by my Epson 950 closely match the monitor I have attached to my iBook when they are viewed in daylight through my window. When viewed under ordinary light bulbs, normal domestic ones with filaments, the prints look a little warmer but are acceptible to me. I have most of my flat lit with low-energy fluorescent bulbs and when viewed under those about half my prints look a little too green to my eyes. This I understand and can live with. The problem arises when I'm producing prints in other than daylight. The computer ...

  1. #1

    Default Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    The colour and density of prints produced by my Epson 950 closely match
    the monitor I have attached to my iBook when they are viewed in
    daylight through my window.

    When viewed under ordinary light bulbs, normal domestic ones with
    filaments, the prints look a little warmer but are acceptible to me. I
    have most of my flat lit with low-energy fluorescent bulbs and when
    viewed under those about half my prints look a little too green to my
    eyes. This I understand and can live with.

    The problem arises when I'm producing prints in other than daylight.
    The computer and monitor have to live in one of the rooms with the
    low-energy bulbs. This makes it difficult to judge them unless I wander
    off into the kitchen (where there's a 'daylight' fluorescent tube) or
    the bathroom where there are filament bulbs.

    I've been thinking of getting a lamp specifically for judging prints
    by. Are there any particular types of lamp and bulbs I should look at
    which don't cost a fortune? I'm wondering if there are any available
    for this very purpose.

    --
    Pete
    ====
    *** Email is pete -at- dawnsun -dot- net
    Peter Gaunt Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    Pete,

    You might look into the "Ott" lights.
    Nancy S Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    If your low energy bulbs are those PL type ones, you certainly will have problems judging your prints.
    I remember from my latest visit to my pro lab they used TL tubes that were rather expensive, although I don't remember the price/type.
    So I suppose walking to the kitchen is the most cost effective way. Moreover, if you own a large house, it might be a nice work out. ;-)

    Like the worlds most famous soccerplayer used to say "Every advantage has a disadvantage".

    Leen
    Leen Koper Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    In article <2ccd2942.0webx.la2eafNXanI>, Nancy S
    <nancyandtomearthlink.net> wrote:
    > Pete,
    >
    > You might look into the "Ott" lights.
    What? I mean what's an 'Ott' light when it's at home?
    Peter Gaunt Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    In article <2ccd2942.1webx.la2eafNXanI>, Leen Koper
    <leenkoperzeelandnet.nl> wrote:
    > If your low energy bulbs are those PL type ones, you certainly will have
    > problems judging your prints.
    Indeed. I don't expect otherwise. Most fluorescent tubes, including
    those wrapped up inside low energy bulbs, emit a discontinuous spectrum
    (try shining one through a prism) which is why it's very difficult to
    colour balance photos taken in their light.
    > I remember from my latest visit to my pro lab they used TL tubes that were
    > rather expensive, although I don't remember the price/type.
    > So I suppose walking to the kitchen is the most cost effective way. Moreover,
    > if you own a large house, it might be a nice work out. ;-)
    It would be but I own a small flat :-(
    Peter Gaunt Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    An Ott light is a particular brand of daylight balanced incandescent (I think) light, much beloved by cross stitchers as it allows them to see the thread colour accurately. I've got an old anglepoise lamp which has a daylight balanced 60watt bulb in it (bought from a lighting supplier) which I bought for embroidery purposes and it makes quite a decent light for judging prints, although it probably isn't quite even enough (too narrow a focus). I try to print in daylight if I can.
    susan S.
    Susan S. Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    Pete,

    These lights are for home use. One can buy a whole lamp assembly or merely purchase one of several bulb types for their own lamps. The spectrum is daylight, have a read at

    <http://www.ott-lite.com/>

    <http://www.ott-lite.com/secondary/secondary.asp?WhichPage=prod&sub=PD&whichcategory= subcategory>
    Nancy S Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    In article <2ccd2942.5webx.la2eafNXanI>, Nancy S
    <nancyandtomearthlink.net> wrote:
    > Pete,
    >
    > These lights are for home use. One can buy a whole lamp assembly or merely
    > purchase one of several bulb types for their own lamps. The spectrum is
    > daylight, have a read at
    >
    > <http://www.ott-lite.com/>
    >
    >
    > <[url]http://www.ott-lite.com/secondary/secondary.asp?WhichPage=prod&sub=PD&whichca[/url]
    > tegory=subcategory>
    Thanks Nancy. They look useful and reasonably priced in the USA though
    no doubt if they're available in the UK they'll just replace the
    dollars with pounds which'll make them a bit pricey :-( There's
    probably a similar product available here anyway now that I know what
    sort of thing I'm looking for.
    Peter Gaunt Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    Peter,

    Well, as you say, the important thing is your knowing there is appropriate lighting for sale so you can look around. Those Ott lights are good and for about $30 US for a bulb is not laughable, anyway. I have the room in which my computer resides lit with the off-shelf, grocery store GE "Reveal" bulbs. Seems to work for me, at about $3 for a pair.
    Nancy S Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    Peter

    As a stop-gap, try Focus (DIY) stores, or an artists shop for a 'daylight bulb'.

    A normal 60/100w bullb with a clear blue coating. Designed for artists to simulate normal daylight.

    Worth a try for a couple of quid. ;)

    Paul
    Paul L UK Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    Paul, I do have this bulb. Somehow it doesnot do the job. Save the quid for a rainy day.

    Leen
    Leen Koper Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Lighting conditions for viewing prints

    These GE "Reveal" bulbs (the manufacturers nomenclature) are advertised as pure, true light and they are definitely worth my money. Thank you Peter and Leen for putting in your 2 cents worth also.
    Nancy S Guest

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