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Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo - Macromedia Freehand

If anyone has the time, I need a really great tutorial or book that will teach me how to trace images. The image Iam using on a website must also transfer to letterheads, envelopes, etc. Thanks ahead of time...

  1. #1

    Default Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    If anyone has the time, I need a really great tutorial or book that will teach me how to trace images. The image Iam using on a website must also transfer to letterheads, envelopes, etc.


    Thanks ahead of time


    meason webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    > If anyone has the time, I need a really great tutorial or book that will
    teach me how to trace images.

    Umm...tracing isn't really a difficult concept. You just need to learn how
    to you the bezier tool, which usually just requires practice.
    >The image Iam using on a website must also transfer to letterheads,
    envelopes, etc.

    Does the client not already have a vector-based logo?

    -Darrel


    darrel Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Hey Darrell, thanks for your time.

    No, right now the image is a jpeg (a comp image). Iam trying to make sure the image I use on the website will translate to paper. If not, I need to scrap the image and look for something else.

    I did use the bezier tool to outline the image. My first effort was horrible. My lines were way to thick and I didn't capture the nuances that I needed. I think with practice, I can get it right. But, a little help along the way (books, tutorials, advice) can speed up the process.

    Thanks again,








    meason webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    > No, right now the image is a jpeg (a comp image). Iam trying to make sure
    the image
    > I use on the website will translate to paper. If not, I need to scrap the
    image and look for something else.

    If it's a logo, you'll want it to be a vector illustration. That will allow
    you to resize the image from a business card to a billboard and retain nice
    clean lines.

    Then, take that image and place it on your web site.
    > I did use the bezier tool to outline the image. My first effort was
    horrible.
    > My lines were way to thick and I didn't capture the nuances that I needed.
    I think with practice, I can get it right.

    Yep. It all takes practice ;o)

    BTW, for the logo, you don't want to use strokes. You want everything to be
    a shape. For instance, if you want a line undernath the logo, draw the line,
    but then expand the stroke so it them becomes a shape, and make sure you do
    not have a color applied to the stroke (just the fill).

    -Darrel


    darrel Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Sometimes, when I have to duplicate logos, if it is a fairly-geometric-like
    logo, it's easier to combine an and punch basic geometric shapes such as
    ovals, rectangles, squares, etc., than it is to try to capture every perfect
    square and curve. This may or may not be helpful. If you draw many shapes on
    top of each other, setting the opacity to, say, 50%, you can lay them out on
    top of the logo and line them up to basically cover the shape, then combine
    them and/or punch them out to create the unique shapes you need... it's a
    quick and easy way to get around having to be perfect with the pen tool...

    "meason" <webforumsusermacromedia.com> wrote in message
    news:bhb91s$19t$1forums.macromedia.com...
    > If anyone has the time, I need a really great tutorial or book that will
    teach me how to trace images. The image Iam using on a website must also
    transfer to letterheads, envelopes, etc.
    >
    >
    > Thanks ahead of time
    >
    >

    Joel Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Thanks for the advice Joel.

    The image for the website is perfect and I think the client will want to use it. Thank you for your ideas. Between you and Darrel, I think I can get back on track.

    Thanks for your time, it is appreciated.


    meason webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Danny Whitehead <dannyspamblocker.bqprint.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:BB5FE48E.4D5A%dannyspamblocker.bqprint.co.uk ...
    > Any chance of seeing the logo in question? It might help us suggest tools
    or
    > methods to use to create a vector version. Is it already up on the
    website?
    > If not, could you upload it somewhere and post a link?
    Having popped into this thread a bit late, that is a question I also wanted
    to ask.

    Some logos, signatures or graphical illustrations are simple to recreate if
    they only use a unique font and/or geometrical looking shapes. Different
    approaches have to be taken for more "organic" looking items. Anything with
    gradient effects and such will be a problem.

    In the currently webby-obsessed world of graphic design, many mistakes are
    made in logo design. Those mistakes turn into extra costs for the customer.
    A proper logo design would be made so it can be produced with a single solid
    ink color and be in pure vector form (real paths for all objects/no raster
    effects crap/no line strokes, etc.).

    Fancy embellishments like drop shadows, glows and other nonsense should
    never be in the original logo design. That's just eye candy to be added
    later in graphical illustrations. This is the one area that infuriates me
    about Photoshop User Magazine. They show all of these logo production
    exercises in Photoshop, all of which create raster based artwork not useable
    in many other places besides a web page. This is very irresponsible on
    their part. If they wanted to do the job correctly, they would have the
    project started within Freehand or Illustrator to create a vector based
    original, then paste the paths in Photoshop to do all that raster filter
    stuff.

    The upside: as long as people keep misusing Photoshop and other image
    editors for logo design, I'll keep making a lot of $50 per hour charges to
    vectorize and fix the results.

    Bobby Henderson


    Bobby Henderson Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Thanks Bobby for your insight.

    I admit it. I'm going backwards.

    The client's logo is a blue heron and up until now they used a clip art piece on their letterhead. The problem is the quality and style of the clip art won't match the website which aims for a sleeker more sophisticated feel.

    You can view the heron on the Getty website, it's ( CC001086). I think it fits the feel the client is after and the website's style. It's beautiful, but the heron in all it's wonder isn't suitable for printing. What I really need to do is to capture the shape and feel of the heron in a format suitable for printing - either by sketching the outline or using shapes.

    I don't have my draft with the logo on the Internet because the image is still under consideration and hasn't been purchased. (Since I've already altered the image to fit the site and there is no "Getty" trademark on it, it's probably not a good idea to put it out there yet.)


    I've gotten really great ideas from everyone so far and I appreciate your input.



    meason webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    I really appreciate your help Bobby.

    It never occurred to me that I might be violating a copyright law by tracing the image. I should have thought of that myself! I am so glad you took the time to help me. Illustrating the heron from several reference examples is a great idea and that's what I will do.

    Many thanks




    meason webforumsuser@macromedia.com Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Another thing worth pointing out about that particular image, is that it
    could be reproduced out of just two inks: cyan and black. It should save a
    lot of money on printing costs if you create the identity using only two
    inks. Bear this in mind when creating your vector version, and mix process
    colours containing only cyan and black.


    Danny

    Danny Whitehead Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Logo on Website to Letterhead Logo

    Anytime you use work created by someone else that could possibly be
    copyrighted you run a significant risk of violating their copyright. That
    includes ANY form of copying.

    Using another's work as "inspiration" for your own creative work or using it
    to determine something like the ratio of the length of a heron's bill to the
    size of its head is usually quite safe. Tracing it automatically or manually
    with a pen tool is usually illegal. Even freehand drawing after viewing the
    original can be a violation if your work closely resembles the orignal and
    contains no new creative work. Simply making small changes to avoid your
    "copy" from being "identical" has been construed as not being "creative
    work" and therefore leaves your "copy" in violation of copyright laws.

    A case in point was an entry into Corel's art contest several years back. It
    was a very skillfully done profile portrait of an American Indian.
    Unfortunately, while it was drawn manually, according to the artist, it was
    done as an attempt to exactly te a photograph taken by someone else.
    Unfortunately for the artist and Corel, the artwork was the winner of the
    contest and recieved much circulation in addition to the money the artist
    was to recieve. The original photo was taken by a major photographic artist
    whose works are commercially valuable in general and was also one of the key
    images being used, with significant fees paid to the photographer, by
    Eastman Kodak in a major ongoing advertising campaign for one of their
    high-end photographic papers. The end result, after a law suit and its
    appeals, was very, very expensive for Corel and for the artist that won
    their contest.

    David W Gangwisch
    Software Design Engineer - FreeHand
    Macromedia, Inc.

    "meason" <webforumsusermacromedia.com> wrote in message
    news:bhgq73$h2j$1forums.macromedia.com...
    > I really appreciate your help Bobby.
    >
    > It never occurred to me that I might be violating a copyright law by
    tracing the image. I should have thought of that myself! I am so glad you
    took the time to help me. Illustrating the heron from several reference
    examples is a great idea and that's what I will do.
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >

    david gangwisch Guest

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