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Long live film!! - Photography

Being the true professional that I claim to be, I accidentally set the ISO on my camera from DX to manual mode, at ISO 6!!! I had an Kodak ISO 200 film in there! It wasn't until 20+ shots later that I discovered the problem. I was ready to kill myself because I had just taken some really nice portraits of this girl that I really like on my trusted 50mm!!! Oh well, maybe it wasn't meant to be! :( I was so depressed but decided to drop the film for developing anyway. It was about 5 stops over exposed, ...

  1. #1

    Default Long live film!!


    Being the true professional that I claim to be, I accidentally set the
    ISO on my camera from DX to manual mode, at ISO 6!!! I had an Kodak
    ISO 200 film in there!

    It wasn't until 20+ shots later that I discovered the problem. I was
    ready to kill myself because I had just taken some really nice
    portraits of this girl that I really like on my trusted 50mm!!!

    Oh well, maybe it wasn't meant to be! :( I was so depressed but
    decided to drop the film for developing anyway. It was about 5 stops
    over exposed, what are the chances of anything coming out of those
    prints?

    Got back the prints today, and much to my surprise, the prints are
    actually of quite acceptable quality! The color is a bit odd and
    washed out, but otherwise it turned out fine!! The portraits turned
    out especially nice, took it in the afternoon with harsh lighting
    conditions, but no trace of shadow on the face and the background is a
    pleasant bright blur. I couldn't believe my eyes, I mean, all these
    times, I've been relying on the advanced matrix metering of my fancy
    camera, when really, I can over expose by 5 stops and still get
    acceptable results!

    Even my 10D friend agreed that had it been on his DSLR, the recovered
    pictures will be no way near as nice as the prints I got. Maybe
    there's a chance with me and the girl after all!!

    Raymond
    nospam@voyager.net Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Post an example.
     


    Marko Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Just curious, but didn't you wonder at the 5 f-stop difference? If not, you
    must be pretty happy any time you get images back from processing.


    <net> wrote in message
    news:bf9ibs$m84$berkeley.edu... 


    McLeod Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    >From: net
     

    Marry the girl.
    Lose the film!




    Annika1980 Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Marko B. <si> wrote:
     
     [/ref]

    I tried scanning the negative using my film scanner. The results are
    far less spectacular, even with photoshop editing. My film scanner
    (Minolta Scan Dual) simply doesn't pull out enough detail from the
    film to make a decent image.

    I will try to find a flatbed and scan the print directly.... :)

    Raymond
    nospam@voyager.net Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Flim, surely?

    --
    Martin
    http://www.btinternet.com/~mcsalty


    Martin Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    >Subject: Long live film!! 

    Don't you know that all Kodak 200 speed color neg films have a true I.S.O. of 6
    (advertising dept. wouldn't let them post such a low speed because it would
    drive away what few customers they have left for this film ;-))? ;-)

    Honestly, my friend, a one hour printer, used to (still does?) complain about
    all the "bullet proof" (dense/overexposed) negatives from 800 speed point and
    shoot cameras? that people brought back from the beach. His printer had to
    virtually make timed exposures in order for it to record on the paper at the
    proper density.

    Amatures overexpose (by a lot) by accident, professionals overexpose slightly,
    on purpose, but either way, thank God, had you been shooting slide film or
    digital your end result would look like the end result of a n*cl**r expl*s**n
    ;-)

    Lewis

    Check out my photos at "LEWISVISION":

    http://members.aol.com/Lewisvisn/home.htm

    Remove "nospam" to reply
    Lewis Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    >Subject: Re: Long live film!! 

    Why can't you make a mistake w/ digital, Tony, because of the instant feedback
    of the LCD display on back of the camera, histogram, something inherent in the
    design of the sensor itself (I don't see how any sensor could tolerate 5 or 6
    stops overexposure and still deliver a usable image - do you shoot in raw mode
    and move the levels of the histogram in Photoshop or something to accomplish
    this "digital miracle"? - this seems to good to be true...).

    TIA

    Regards,

    Lewis

    Check out my photos at "LEWISVISION":

    http://members.aol.com/Lewisvisn/home.htm

    Remove "nospam" to reply
    Lewis Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Lewis Lang <comnospam> wrote:
     

    I am curious, why do professionals overexpose slightly?

    On a separate note, assume that I am taking pictures outside where the
    light is not changing too much, is it OK to just use a graycard and
    get a reading, and use that for all the shots in the same environment?

    ie, set the camera to manual, use the greycard to get a reading, and
    use it for all the shots on the beach... (assuming no cloud and sun
    doesn't change much). Is this better than using matrix metering where
    the camera will try to render the scene 18%?

    Thanks.

    Raymond
    nospam@voyager.net Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Mxsmanic <com> wrote:
     [/ref]
     

    I might be going out with her again this weekend. This time with a
    legendary 105mm f2.5 portrait lens.

    Let's hope this time I'll get it right! :)

    Raymond
    nospam@voyager.net Guest

  11. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Removed by Administrator
    Avogadro Guest
    Moderated Post

  12. #12

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    net writes:
     

    Mmm ... sounds nice. That's a good focal length.

    What did she think of the previous pictures? Did she notice anything
    unusual about the poorly exposed shots?

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
    Mxsmanic Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    net writes:
     

    They don't, unless they are superstitious.
     

    Absolutely. As long as the light doesn't change, you don't need to
    change exposure, as long as you want "real-life" exposures.
     

    It depends on what you want. Incident or gray-card metering gives you
    the "real-life" exposure--that is, density on the final image will
    accurately reflect the light levels in the original scene. However,
    this type of metering also means that you may lose detail in shadows or
    highlights if contrast is strong ... and if those highlights or shadows
    contain important elements of your composition, that could be a problem.

    Matrix metering, or any reflective metering, will try to balance
    exposure so that a maximum amount of detail is retained over a maximal
    area of the image, even if this means using an "unreal" exposure that
    makes coal or snow look gray instead of black and white, respectively.
    Whether you want that or not depends on what you are shooting.

    If you are shooting slides AND you intend to actually project these
    slides directly onto a screen, incident (gray-card) metering is the best
    choice for just about all situations, because you need to have your
    slides match the light levels of the original scene, or they won't look
    realistic. If you are shooting for prints or scanning, you can afford
    to tweak exposure a lot more.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
    Mxsmanic Guest

  14. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Removed by Administrator
    Mxsmanic Guest
    Moderated Post

  15. #15

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    > I might be going out with her again this weekend. This time with a 

    This is where you casually introduce the idea of s.

    "So, how'd you like the shots of you I made?"
    "Hmm, well, there was something about the exp-"
    "Great! So how about we do some s?"
    *slap*

    In all seriousness, I understand the gravity of your situation. I freak out
    about chick shots of girls I like too.
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training


    Phil, Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    You can't make a mistake because whereever you set the ISO it will shoot at
    that ISO. With film you might be able to get pictures, but as the guy
    pointed out the negatives gave his scanner fits, so you know they are going
    to be a bi*ch to print at all. The modern mni-lab is a wonder, I admit, but
    how many people would be able to get a print out of a six stop over-exposed
    negative in a home darkroom - especially colour? And six stops under exposed
    is going to be blank film with negative material or black with slides.
    With digital you might set a completely inappropriate ISO and try
    shooting car races with a shutter speed of 1/8th second (which I happen to
    like but I'll try to stay away away from asthetics here) but the picture
    will be exposed properly and will print well.
    The ISO is not tied to the "roll" with digital, therefore there is no way
    to make the mistake in the first place. This is another instance of
    presenting a negative (shooting at the wrong ISO) as a positive (getting
    "acceptable prints) when the original negative does not exist with digital
    and therefore cannot be corrected in the printing stage!

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    New email - Contact on the Menyou page.
    "Lewis Lang" <comnospam> wrote in message
    news:aol.com... [/ref]
    the [/ref]
    make [/ref]
    before [/ref]
    black. 
    >
    > Why can't you make a mistake w/ digital, Tony, because of the instant[/ref]
    feedback 
    the 
    or 6 
    mode 
    accomplish 


    Tony Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    > Even my 10D friend agreed that had it been on his DSLR, the recovered 

    Ah...Except that with the 10D, you'd have **seen** your mistake on the very
    first shot review! :)


    Mark Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    LOL :)

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <ii.com> wrote in message
    news:bd2Sa.124594$tampabay.rr.com... 
    >
    > This is where you casually introduce the idea of s.
    >
    > "So, how'd you like the shots of you I made?"
    > "Hmm, well, there was something about the exp-"
    > "Great! So how about we do some s?"
    > *slap*
    >
    > In all seriousness, I understand the gravity of your situation. I freak[/ref]
    out 


    Marko Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    Professionals sometimes overexpose slightly because of mainly historical
    reasons. The only true professional negative films that gave good skin
    tones used to be medium contrast films designed for studio use, like Kodak
    VPS. With a high contrast lighting source like studio flash these films
    performed well. Outdoors, the colour saturation was flat when exposed at
    the rated ISO, so pros started overexposing to increase the density and
    boost the colour saturation. Nowadays there a lots of films designed for
    professional use with increased colour saturation to be used outdoors.


    <net> wrote in message
    news:bfa5at$12s5$berkeley.edu... [/ref]
    slightly, [/ref]
    or [/ref]
    expl*s**n 
    >
    > I am curious, why do professionals overexpose slightly?
    >
    > On a separate note, assume that I am taking pictures outside where the
    > light is not changing too much, is it OK to just use a graycard and
    > get a reading, and use that for all the shots in the same environment?
    >
    > ie, set the camera to manual, use the greycard to get a reading, and
    > use it for all the shots on the beach... (assuming no cloud and sun
    > doesn't change much). Is this better than using matrix metering where
    > the camera will try to render the scene 18%?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Raymond[/ref]


    McLeod Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Long live film!!

    While I'd recommend shooting ISO 200 at ISO 100 for better results, shooting
    it at ISO 6 is a bit much : )
    <net> wrote in message
    news:bf9ibs$m84$berkeley.edu... 


    jriegle Guest

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