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lost part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem - debian(woody) - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

Hi all, I inadvertently deleted part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem doing a "rm -r /usr/local". Although I stopped the command immediately when I noticed my fault, I lost about 90 Mb of the filesystem. Among others were the directoies: bin, games, include, lib, lost+found, man, sbin, share My system is running, but I worry about the loss of the "lost+found"-directory. Is this critical? And if so, is there a way to repair it? Unfortunately I haven't made a backup yet, so I cannot restore things from a backup-medium. Considering the other lost directories, I think that is not so harmful and ...

  1. #1

    Default lost part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem - debian(woody)

    Hi all,

    I inadvertently deleted part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem doing a "rm
    -r /usr/local". Although I stopped the command immediately when I
    noticed my fault, I lost about 90 Mb of the filesystem. Among others
    were the directoies:

    bin, games, include, lib, lost+found, man, sbin, share

    My system is running, but I worry about the loss of the
    "lost+found"-directory. Is this critical? And if so, is there a way to
    repair it? Unfortunately I haven't made a backup yet, so I cannot
    restore things from a backup-medium.

    Considering the other lost directories, I think that is not so harmful
    and I can refill them occasionally whenever an application is missing
    a needed file. But perhaps somebodey can tell me which applcations put
    their files by default in one of the above mentioned directories.

    Thank you in advance
    Friedhelm

    F. Kappen Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: lost part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem - debian(woody)

    "F. Kappen" wrote:
    >
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I inadvertently deleted part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem doing a "rm
    > -r /usr/local". Although I stopped the command immediately when I
    > noticed my fault, I lost about 90 Mb of the filesystem. Among others
    > were the directoies:
    >
    > bin, games, include, lib, lost+found, man, sbin, share
    >
    > My system is running, but I worry about the loss of the
    > "lost+found"-directory. Is this critical? And if so, is there a way to
    > repair it?
    'mkdir lost+found' maybe?
    > Unfortunately I haven't made a backup yet, so I cannot
    > restore things from a backup-medium.
    >
    > Considering the other lost directories, I think that is not so harmful
    > and I can refill them occasionally whenever an application is missing
    > a needed file. But perhaps somebodey can tell me which applcations put
    > their files by default in one of the above mentioned directories.
    On a Debian system, all .deb packages should normally put themselves in
    /usr/bin, /usr/lib, etc. The only thing that you're likely to find in
    /usr/local/bin are programs from other sources (e.g., programs you've
    tarballs). Unfortunately, this makes it harder to recover without a
    backup, unless you know what you've downloaded and installed there.
    John-Paul Stewart Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: lost part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem - debian(woody)

    F. Kappen wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I inadvertently deleted part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem doing a "rm
    > -r /usr/local". Although I stopped the command immediately when I
    > noticed my fault, I lost about 90 Mb of the filesystem. Among others
    > were the directoies:
    >
    > bin, games, include, lib, lost+found, man, sbin, share
    >
    > My system is running, but I worry about the loss of the
    > "lost+found"-directory. Is this critical? And if so, is there a way to
    > repair it? Unfortunately I haven't made a backup yet, so I cannot
    > restore things from a backup-medium.
    It's not usually vital. If /usr/local is a partition, that directory was
    created when you built a filesystem on it, to store debris discovered
    when you run "fsck" to check on or repair that filesystem.

    Don't worry about it, I believe that most fsck-like programs will
    automatically generate it on the fly.
    > Considering the other lost directories, I think that is not so harmful
    > and I can refill them occasionally whenever an application is missing
    > a needed file. But perhaps somebodey can tell me which applcations put
    > their files by default in one of the above mentioned directories.
    "It depends". Many distributions do not use those at all, putting all
    system files in /usr instead. /usr/local is very useful for packages
    that are fresh built from new tarballs, hot off the griddle, before
    anyone competent has had a chance to update the published packages, or
    for putting a second version in place for comparison testing.

    Nico Kadel-Garcia Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: lost part of my "/usr/local"-filesystem - debian(woody)

    Thank you John-Paul and Nico,

    for your reply. Now I can sleep a little better - without worrying about
    my disturbed filesystem.

    Cheers
    Friedhelm

    F. Kappen Guest

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