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Macs & Worms? - Mac Applications & Software

In article <aol.com>, com (VirginiaHooperNY) wrote:   We can't get one of the Microsoft worms currently going around, no. They require Pentium-like processors.   Try using /Applications/Utilities/Process Viewer to see if there's something unusual going on. -- Today, on Paper-view: Pulp Fiction!...

  1. #1

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    In article <aol.com>,
    com (VirginiaHooperNY) wrote:
     

    We can't get one of the Microsoft worms currently going around, no.
    They require Pentium-like processors.

     

    Try using /Applications/Utilities/Process Viewer to see if there's
    something unusual going on.

    --
    Today, on Paper-view: Pulp Fiction!
    Howard Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    "Bev A. Kupf" <mimnet.northwestern.edu> writes:
     
    >
    > And a Microsoft operating system. There are other choices for
    > pentium like processors, you know -- including Darwin.[/ref]

    Well, the "currently going around" part is correct. And you are
    correct. But I think you both are partly wrong, as the issue is really
    Microsoft, not OS or processor. The current rash of crap requires the MS OS
    which in turn requires the processor. But there are macro viruses, which
    will operate in Microsoft apps regardless of OS and processor.

    --
    Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
    Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip
    http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.
    Phil Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    Kevin Michael Vail writes:
     
    >
    > Does it still come with .Mac?[/ref]

    Yes.
    --
    Jussi Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    In article <newsguy.com>, Howard S
    Shubs wrote: 
    >
    > We can't get one of the Microsoft worms currently going around, no.
    > They require Pentium-like processors.[/ref]

    Note that VirtualPC uses a "Pentium-like [you really mean Intel-like]
    processor", via emulation. You can definitely be infected on Mac
    hardware if you're running emulated Windows in this way, but the ill
    effects will [probably] be restricted to the Windows environment.

    Conversely, you can't be infected by the common viruses and worms if
    you run linux or bsd or solaris or darwin or beos on your
    intel/pentium box, except, again, via Windows emulation (eg VMWare).

    The key common denominator here is Windows. By implication that means
    an Intel-like processor, physical or virtual, since that's the only
    platform Windows runs on. But it's flaws in the design of OS that are
    being exploited, not the flaws in the processor.

    Of course there are other kinds of security exploits in unix-like
    operating systems, including OSX, that you need to be conscious of, as
    well as non-OS infections courtesy of Microsoft's inability to design
    clean, robust software (eg Word viruses). So you can't ignore
    security entirely. But you can come close if you keep your OSX
    up-to-date, run the builtin firewall and avoid _everything_ from
    Microsoft.


















    tristero Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

     


    Sort them on Processor-usage. If there are a few that are over 50% while
    you are not doing anything, this is the cause of the rest feeling slow.
    Note that this doesn't say yet if it is unusual, popular things to run
    in the background are fix_prebinding en contentindexing.

    Let us know if and what is eating up your cpu-time.

    Jaco Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    On Sun, 24 Aug 2003 15:32:45 -0600, Tom Harrington <no.spam.dammit.net> wrote: 

    The thing is, the first step of one of those is going to be "please
    run this with 'sudo' and enter your root password so it works".

    It's not about market penetration, it's about the security model.
    On OSX, all of the system stuff is protected from users and the
    processes they run, unless they are running as root all the time (which
    they should not be). The reason windows is so easy to write viruses for,
    is that it doesn't make that distinction, or doesn't make it very well.
    Any program you have permission to install, can overwrite system dll files,
    which can cause other programs to break, work differently, or do something
    entirely different.

    It all comes down to this: in OSX/*-BSD/Unix/Linux, the system and
    the users are separate, in windows, the system trusts the user with it's
    internals. Until/unless that changes, Windows will continue to be a
    frequent target for virus writers. It's not about market share, it's
    about system architecture.

    Dave Hinz

    Dave Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    On Mon, 25 Aug 2003 13:58:40 -0600, Tom Harrington <no.spam.dammit.net> wrote: [/ref]
    (snip) 

    Fair enough. I suppose there are a couple of ways to do nasty things,
    but yeah, it wouldn't be a virus by the classical definition.
     

    Are that many people running in "admin" mode all the time, though? I
    created a user (bet you can't guess the account name) who is literally
    "Joe User" - isn't in the sudoers file, has no admin rights, etc. That's
    who I'm logged in as 99% of the time. But you're right, a lot of folks
    probably log in as the first (only) user on their system, who can
    become admin just by typing a password.

    How does that work for someone like you who writes software for Mac folks?
    Do you specify that they have to be admin, or how do you explain that
    concept in your installation instructions? Or, does your install script
    go out & see if they're allowed?

    Dave Hinz

    Dave Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    In article <bidqk2$8brie$news.uni-berlin.de>,
    Dave Hinz <net> wrote:
     
    >
    > Are that many people running in "admin" mode all the time, though? I
    > created a user (bet you can't guess the account name) who is literally
    > "Joe User" - isn't in the sudoers file, has no admin rights, etc. That's
    > who I'm logged in as 99% of the time. But you're right, a lot of folks
    > probably log in as the first (only) user on their system, who can
    > become admin just by typing a password.[/ref]

    I couldn't hazard a guess on percentages. But given that we're
    considering those users who would enter their password without question,
    it's probably safe to guess that those users also wouldn't have set up
    multiple accounts in the interest of security.
     

    Those password-prompt windows are IMHO poorly phrased, but can't be
    reworded by the developer [1]. What the windows want is an admin
    username and password, and any one will do. So the effect is, if the
    user's not an admin, they either need to have a secondary account with
    admin rights or they need to sweet-talk the admin into entering their
    own information.

    The API used for all this is Mac OS X-speficic, but the algorithm is
    effectively something like, first check if the information entered is an
    admin account. Next, if the entered login info is the same as the
    current user, then use sudo for whatever needs doing, and if it's
    someone else, then su to them before proceeding.

    [1] OK, so I could design a window saying whatever I want it to say, but
    doing so would bypass all that useful security code that Apple gives me
    for free.

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 1.4: Best cleanup yet, gets files other tools miss.
    See http://www.atomicbird.com/
    Tom Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    Tom Harrington <no.spam.dammit.net> wrote in message news:<tph-02806F.15153225082003localhost>... 
    > >
    > > Are that many people running in "admin" mode all the time, though? I
    > > created a user (bet you can't guess the account name) who is literally
    > > "Joe User" - isn't in the sudoers file, has no admin rights, etc. That's
    > > who I'm logged in as 99% of the time. But you're right, a lot of folks
    > > probably log in as the first (only) user on their system, who can
    > > become admin just by typing a password.[/ref]
    >
    > I couldn't hazard a guess on percentages. But given that we're
    > considering those users who would enter their password without question,
    > it's probably safe to guess that those users also wouldn't have set up
    > multiple accounts in the interest of security.

    >
    > Those password-prompt windows are IMHO poorly phrased, but can't be
    > reworded by the developer [1]. What the windows want is an admin
    > username and password, and any one will do. So the effect is, if the
    > user's not an admin, they either need to have a secondary account with
    > admin rights or they need to sweet-talk the admin into entering their
    > own information.
    >
    > The API used for all this is Mac OS X-speficic, but the algorithm is
    > effectively something like, first check if the information entered is an
    > admin account. Next, if the entered login info is the same as the
    > current user, then use sudo for whatever needs doing, and if it's
    > someone else, then su to them before proceeding.
    >
    > [1] OK, so I could design a window saying whatever I want it to say, but
    > doing so would bypass all that useful security code that Apple gives me
    > for free.[/ref]

    Oh, you two are so *nice*. So... when are Dave and Tom picking out
    curtain patterns?

    Richard, who is G,D&R like Hell.
    Richard Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

     

    I think 10.2 handles this quite nicely. Most things that need admin
    access have a lock-symbol somewhere to temporarily upgraded that
    application to admin-access. Others can be persuaded by running them
    through tools like "Pseudo" or "Rooter". And for those who are not
    afraid of the Terminal, many things can be accomplished without logging
    out. I rarely log in as admin.

    (But I'm longing for the user switching without logging out in 10.3 as
    my wife and I both like to use the computer a couple of times a day...
    Of course my wife and I both log in as normal users.)

    Jaco Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    On 25 Aug 2003 22:35:56 -0700, Richard Fitzpatrick <com> wrote: [/ref]
     
    >>
    >> The API used for all this is Mac OS X-speficic, but the algorithm is
    >> effectively something like, first check if the information entered is an
    >> admin account.[/ref][/ref]
     

    Hey...wait a second, I recognize that voice...
     

    It's funny running into someone from a different froup in an entirely
    foreign (heh) context.

    Dave "run faster...I know where you're headed..." Hinz

    Dave Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    In article <3f4b6b93$0$49104$xs4all.nl>, Jaco Schoonen
    <no> wrote:
     

    Hmm, I haven't done much non-admin work, so I'll have to take your word
    for it, though it seems that this could be a pretty significant
    security risk. Are you sure you're not thinking of the way lock icons
    work in admin accounts? Also, see below...
     

    I recently did a bunch of testing of this, and sudo does not even work
    if you're not an admin user. Unless of course you're very Unix-savvy
    and have added that user to the list of users allowed to use sudo.
    Which most people aren't.

    Is there some other way you know to make admin- or root-level changes
    while not logged in as an admin user?

    --
    -Thomas

    <http://www.bitjuggler.com/>
    Thomas Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Macs & Worms?

    In article <bifuch$8uqr9$news.uni-berlin.de>,
    Dave Hinz <net> wrote:
     [/ref]
    > [/ref]

    >
    > Hey...wait a second, I recognize that voice...[/ref]

    Richard's not supposed to be in this newsgroup. He's crossing the beams!
     
    >
    > It's funny running into someone from a different froup in an entirely
    > foreign (heh) context.
    >
    > Dave "run faster...I know where you're headed..." Hinz[/ref]

    I know where I'm headed... surely Google can find something
    interesting...

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 1.4: Best cleanup yet, gets files other tools miss.
    See http://www.atomicbird.com/
    Tom Guest

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