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Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D - Photography

Hi, Whats the maximum lens sharpness that the Canon 300D can use? I mean whats the maximum lpm that the 300D can benefit from? Also, the 20D. Thanks, Siddhartha...

  1. #1

    Default Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    Hi,

    Whats the maximum lens sharpness that the Canon 300D can use? I mean
    whats the maximum lpm that the 300D can benefit from? Also, the 20D.

    Thanks,

    Siddhartha

    Siddhartha Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    Siddhartha Jain wrote: 

    Pardon my limited knowledge when it comes to optical jargon like
    MTF/lpm etc etc.

    - Siddhartha

    Siddhartha Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D


    "Siddhartha Jain" <co.uk> wrote in message
    news:googlegroups.com... 

    Theoretically (based on Canon specifications which are unclear about
    physical sensor vs image size):
    - The 300D cannot exceed 3072px / 22.7mm = 135 lines/mm horizontally,
    and 2048px / 15.1mm = 136 lines/mm vertically. That would be equal to
    a sample pitch of 7.3 micron on average.
    - The 350D (to keep the topic up-to-date) cannot exceed 3456px /
    22.2mm = 156 lines/mm horizontally, and 2304px / 14.8mm = 156 lines/mm
    vertically. That would be equal to a sample pitch of 6.4 micron.
    - The 20D cannot exceed 3504px / 22.5mm = 156 lines/mm horizontally,
    and 2336px / 15.0mm = 156 lines/mm vertically. That would be equal to
    a sample pitch of 6.4 micron.

    That theoretical limit for luminance resolution is deliberately
    reduced by an Anti-Aliasing filter, and an attempt is made to
    reconstruct that, during Bayer CFA reconstruction. Losses due to
    camera shake also play a role.

    A more common measure for resolution of so-called discrete sampling
    systems is cycles/mm, so to keep things simple you could say that the
    300D can resolve up to 68 cy/mm on the sensor, and the 350D and the
    20D can resolve up to 78 cy/mm on the sensor.
    Again, those are theoretical limits for high contrast features, and
    the AA-filter will gradually reduce contrast as that limit is
    approached. Low contrast features will be harder to resolve, and with
    lenses that produce lower contrast, the visible resolution will suffer
    even more. IAW, the 350D/20D requires a somewhat better lens to fully
    exploit the better resolution.

    Lenses generally are capable of much higher resolution than the
    sensor, although contrast may be low. So what you really need to know
    is what the combination of lens+AA-filter+sensor brings in terms of
    contrast as a function of spatial frequency (=system MTF).

    Another important factor is the Raw convertor that's used, and the
    amount of sharpening that's applied in post-processing.

    So in general, your question can only be answered in general terms.
    Good lenses will exceed the capabilities of the sensor. Better lenses
    will produce images that look sharper (= have higher contrast
    details), especially throughout the image, i.e. also in the corners.
    Higher on sensor resolution can be enlarged more, before visible image
    resolution suffers. The 350D/20D will better utilize the lens
    capabilities (or rather reveal its shortcomings).

    Ultimately, it's the (printed) image that must be compared for a real
    judgement, but the MTF can predict what the limits are. There are also
    other lens parameters than resolution alone, that help to produce
    technically good looking images. And then there's the photographer...

    Bart

    Bart Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    Bart van der Wolf wrote:

     


    But as you said, the "tested" resolution of the lenses is done with a high
    contrast target, the lower contrast areas will have less resolution but the
    sensor can still record information there. That's why I don't look too much
    at the results from high contrast test targets when evaluating whether a
    lens is "too good" for a camera or not.

    ANother thing to consider is where is the lens being tested? It may be
    better than needed at say F8 but not good enough wide open. The only real
    way to know is to go test this for yourself.

    --

    Stacey
    Stacey Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

     

    Good post, Bart. A chain breaks at weakest link. A system view is very
    important when one is searching for the best performance.


    Charles Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    In article <com>,
    Charles Schuler <net> wrote: 
    >
    >Good post, Bart. A chain breaks at weakest link. A system view is very
    >important when one is searching for the best performance.[/ref]

    It's not that simple, either. The strength of the weakest link is the
    most important contributor, but the strength of the other links matter.

    A lens capable of 75 lp/mm in front of a sensor capable of 50 lp/mm will
    deliver something closer to 30 lp/mm (1 / (1/50 + 1/75) ) than 50 lp/mm


    John Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

     

    Yes, but the above sensor limit is the weakest link; using your example:
    put a 200 lp/mm lens in front and you get 40 lp/mm. Put an infinitely
    resolved lens in front of it, and you will get very close to 50 lp/mm (the
    weak link). You cannot exceed the weakest link in a chain! The point of my
    post was to offer some advice to others so as to help them balance their
    purchases. Too many folks seem to think in terms of just one element of a
    system.


    Charles Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D


    "John Francis" <com> wrote in message
    news:cvb3fv$4v$panix.com... [/ref][/ref]
    is [/ref][/ref]
    contrast 
    > >
    > >Good post, Bart. A chain breaks at weakest link. A system view is very
    > >important when one is searching for the best performance.[/ref]
    >
    > It's not that simple, either. The strength of the weakest link is the
    > most important contributor, but the strength of the other links matter.
    >
    > A lens capable of 75 lp/mm in front of a sensor capable of 50 lp/mm will
    > deliver something closer to 30 lp/mm (1 / (1/50 + 1/75) ) than 50 lp/mm[/ref]

    I'm new to this and had a question about "resolution capabitity". I have
    seen MTF graphs on several lenses, and few provide much more than 50%
    contrast at 40 l/mm. At 75 l/mm contrast would be very low. So, by "capable
    of 75 l/mm", do you mean any contrast at all? Thanks.


    Steve Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    In article <lLbSd.18757$Tt.3301fed1read05>,
    Steve Gavette <cox.spam.net.4me> wrote: [/ref]
    >is [/ref]
    >contrast 
    >>
    >> It's not that simple, either. The strength of the weakest link is the
    >> most important contributor, but the strength of the other links matter.
    >>
    >> A lens capable of 75 lp/mm in front of a sensor capable of 50 lp/mm will
    >> deliver something closer to 30 lp/mm (1 / (1/50 + 1/75) ) than 50 lp/mm[/ref]
    >
    >I'm new to this and had a question about "resolution capabitity". I have
    >seen MTF graphs on several lenses, and few provide much more than 50%
    >contrast at 40 l/mm. At 75 l/mm contrast would be very low. So, by "capable
    >of 75 l/mm", do you mean any contrast at all? Thanks.[/ref]

    You're getting things backwards. A lens that is capable of resolving
    40 lp/mm (that 'p' is important) with a medium-contrast target would
    be able to resolve considerably more with a higher-contrast target.
    Some tests are carried out with a target that has 1000:1 brightness
    ratio between the dark and light parts of the target.
    (And, in any case, it was just a number used as an example)

    John Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D


    "John Francis" <com> wrote in message
    news:cvbj6t$k43$panix.com... [/ref][/ref]
    know 
    > >contrast [/ref][/ref]
    very [/ref][/ref]
    will 
    > >
    > >I'm new to this and had a question about "resolution capabitity". I have
    > >seen MTF graphs on several lenses, and few provide much more than 50%
    > >contrast at 40 l/mm. At 75 l/mm contrast would be very low. So, by[/ref][/ref]
    "capable 
    >
    > You're getting things backwards. A lens that is capable of resolving
    > 40 lp/mm (that 'p' is important) with a medium-contrast target would
    > be able to resolve considerably more with a higher-contrast target.
    > Some tests are carried out with a target that has 1000:1 brightness
    > ratio between the dark and light parts of the target.
    > (And, in any case, it was just a number used as an example)[/ref]

    Sorry, I omitted the "pairs". But what I meant in my question (regardless of
    actual number used, i.e. 75) was in MTF graphs I have seen resolution is
    referenced to a percentage, not an absolute value. I have not seen a graph
    showing maximum line frequency resolved. Would this be the point at which
    you get a solid gray image?


    Steve Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    In article <ggeSd.18779$Tt.11892fed1read05>,
    Steve Gavette <cox.spam.net.4me> wrote: [/ref]
    >know [/ref]
    >very [/ref]
    >will [/ref]
    >"capable 
    >>
    >> You're getting things backwards. A lens that is capable of resolving
    >> 40 lp/mm (that 'p' is important) with a medium-contrast target would
    >> be able to resolve considerably more with a higher-contrast target.
    >> Some tests are carried out with a target that has 1000:1 brightness
    >> ratio between the dark and light parts of the target.
    >> (And, in any case, it was just a number used as an example)[/ref]
    >
    >Sorry, I omitted the "pairs". But what I meant in my question (regardless of
    >actual number used, i.e. 75) was in MTF graphs I have seen resolution is
    >referenced to a percentage, not an absolute value. I have not seen a graph
    >showing maximum line frequency resolved. Would this be the point at which
    >you get a solid gray image?[/ref]

    It's usually the point at which the difference between light and dark
    falls below some particular threshhold; the case you quote (the point
    at which you get a solid grey image, with no discernible differences)
    would be the maximal limiting case.

    Informally, rather than taking strict MTF measurements, people often
    use the simpler test of using a simple alternating black/white target,
    at various spatial frequencies, and quoting the highest line density
    (at the sensor) which still shows visible banding.
    This will be similar to (but slightly higher) than the 10% MTF number.

    It's more complicated with digital sensors, as opposed to film, because
    you also have the potential problems introduced by aliasing between the
    pattern frequency and the grid frequency of the sensor elements.
    John Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D

    "Steve Gavette" <cox.spam.net.4me> writes:
     

    There is some objective limit, but it's quite low. "Capable of
    resolving 75 lp/mm" may well mean that the MTF drops to 1% at that
    frequency. That's at the threshold of visibility with a 100:1 contrast
    test target, and below visibility with normal subjects.

    Dave
    Dave Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Maximum sharpness on Canon 300D


    "Dave Martindale" <ubc.ca> wrote in message
    news:cvdc97$m1f$cs.ubc.ca... [/ref]
    "capable 
    >
    > There is some objective limit, but it's quite low. "Capable of
    > resolving 75 lp/mm" may well mean that the MTF drops to 1% at that
    > frequency. That's at the threshold of visibility with a 100:1 contrast
    > test target, and below visibility with normal subjects.
    >
    > Dave[/ref]

    Thanks John and Dave for your replies. I think I've got it.


    Steve Guest

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