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Metering and exposure - Photography

Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know nothing about the zone system. Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops. Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera recommended exposure swing more than that? Thanks, Siddhartha...

  1. #1

    Default Metering and exposure

    Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    nothing about the zone system.

    Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    at 1/3rd EV stops.

    Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    recommended exposure swing more than that?


    Thanks,

    Siddhartha

    Siddhartha Jain Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Metering and exposure

    On 4 Jan 2005 04:50:52 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    <losttoy2000yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    >spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    >nothing about the zone system.
    >
    >Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    >instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    >plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    >at 1/3rd EV stops.
    >
    >Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    >recommended exposure swing more than that?
    bracketing, also known as "the shotgun method", will work in many
    cases as long as you are not shooting in extreme light or extreme dark
    situations. You will use alot of film with that method.
    You are probably best off getting yourself a decent light meter such
    as the Sekonic L-508 and learning to use it. I also suggest a book by
    Jim Zuckerman entitled Perfect Exposure.

    Good luck,

    Joe
    stator Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Metering and exposure

    On 4 Jan 2005 04:50:52 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    <losttoy2000yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    >spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    >nothing about the zone system.
    >
    >Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    >instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    >plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    >at 1/3rd EV stops.
    >
    >Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    >recommended exposure swing more than that?
    I usually try to find the mid-tone area in the shot and use a zoom
    lense, if necessary, to get an exposure reading and use that reading
    for the entire shot.

    Hope that helps a bit.

    Joe

    [url]http://mikmaq.cjb.net[/url]
    stator Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Metering and exposure

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 16:12:10 -0500, stator wrote:
    > On 4 Jan 2005 04:50:52 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    > <losttoy2000yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    >>spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    >>nothing about the zone system.
    >>
    >>Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    >>instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    >>plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    >>at 1/3rd EV stops.
    >>
    >>Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    >>recommended exposure swing more than that?
    >
    > bracketing, also known as "the shotgun method", will work in many
    > cases as long as you are not shooting in extreme light or extreme dark
    > situations. You will use alot of film with that method.
    Use a lot of *film*? I think you're in the wrong newsgroup.
    > You are probably best off getting yourself a decent light meter such
    > as the Sekonic L-508 and learning to use it. I also suggest a book by
    > Jim Zuckerman entitled Perfect Exposure.
    And why not. Won't save on film though ;-)

    --
    John Bean

    A cynic is a man who, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin
    (H. L. Mencken)
    John Bean Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Metering and exposure

    stator wrote:
    > bracketing, also known as "the shotgun method", will work in many
    > cases as long as you are not shooting in extreme light or extreme dark
    > situations.
    There is no need to bracket in most situations, but rather understand where
    the metered part of the scene sits in the film latitude. Bracketing is
    more legitimate in unusual lighting such as strong back light with poorly
    lit subjects.

    > You will use alot of film with that method.
    OTOH, with a digital camera (group topic), one can find the range of
    acceptable exposures quite quickly.

    Cheers,
    Alan.


    --
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    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: [url]http://www.pbase.com/shootin[/url]
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne_ Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Metering and exposure

    My bad!
    :-)

    old habits die hard.

    Regards,
    Joe

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:38:59 +0000, John Bean <waterfoot>
    wrote:
    >On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 16:12:10 -0500, stator wrote:
    >
    >> On 4 Jan 2005 04:50:52 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    >> <losttoy2000yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    >>>spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    >>>nothing about the zone system.
    >>>
    >>>Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    >>>instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    >>>plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    >>>at 1/3rd EV stops.
    >>>
    >>>Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    >>>recommended exposure swing more than that?
    >>
    >> bracketing, also known as "the shotgun method", will work in many
    >> cases as long as you are not shooting in extreme light or extreme dark
    >> situations. You will use alot of film with that method.
    >
    >Use a lot of *film*? I think you're in the wrong newsgroup.
    >
    >> You are probably best off getting yourself a decent light meter such
    >> as the Sekonic L-508 and learning to use it. I also suggest a book by
    >> Jim Zuckerman entitled Perfect Exposure.
    >
    >And why not. Won't save on film though ;-)
    stator Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Metering and exposure

    In article <1104843052.165750.305790c13g2000cwb.googlegroups .com>,
    Siddhartha Jain <losttoy2000yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    >spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    >nothing about the zone system.
    >
    >Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    >instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    >plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    >at 1/3rd EV stops.
    >
    >Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    >recommended exposure swing more than that?
    Yes - easily. +/- 2/3 EV is a fairly small range. It's possible for
    the meter on the camera to read as much as two stops away from ideal.

    But with most DSLRs you have a far better evaluative tool available;
    the histogram display (plus, on many models, highlighting of burned
    out or grossly underexposed areas)

    Take the shot, look at the histogram, and decide what adjustment
    to make. Lather, rinse, repeat.

    Alternatively, if you think you've got the exposure right to within
    half a stop or so (i.e. within the rage that bracketing would cover)
    just use RAW image capture mode, if available. It will use up less
    storage than five high-quality JPEGs, and in most of the DSLRs that
    I have used you get maybe as much as 1.5 stops of extra latitude.

    John Francis Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Metering and exposure


    "Siddhartha Jain" <losttoy2000yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:1104843052.165750.305790c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
    > Ok, lets say I know nothing about using partial, centre-weighted or
    > spot meter and I still want to get the correct exposure. Also, I know
    > nothing about the zone system.
    >
    > Would you say, I can achieve the same results by bracketing? Take five
    > instead of one shot with one at the camera recommended exposure, 2 at
    > plus the recommended at 1/3rd EV stops and 2 at minus the recommended
    > at 1/3rd EV stops.
    >
    > Or, can the difference between the correct exposure and camera
    > recommended exposure swing more than that?
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Siddhartha
    >
    Read this book:

    Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or
    Digital Camera (Updated Edition) by Bryan Peterson

    You will find that bracketing is unnecessary for most situations once you
    understand some metering concepts. It would not hurt to understand your
    metering modes and metering in general (eg how to meter green etc). The
    problem with AEB is that you dont know how the camera is adjusting A/T since
    for example depth of field may be more important that capturing a moving
    object with a fast shutter.


    Musty Guest

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