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Migrating from Access - MySQL

Hi I have been tasked with migrating data from a large MS-Access DB to a client server database. I have SQL Server and MySQL as options. more importantly the client wishes to still use their old Access forms front end for a while after the data migration. Can anybody comment on whether this import is easier into MySQL or SQL Server. I have read some of the MS docs on this so called "Upsizing" and have been made aware of some of the many pitfalls. Just wondering whether MySQL has anything to speed up the import. Has anybody got an ...

  1. #1

    Default Migrating from Access

    Hi

    I have been tasked with migrating data from a large MS-Access DB to a
    client server database. I have SQL Server and MySQL as options. more
    importantly the client wishes to still use their old Access forms
    front end for a while after the data migration.

    Can anybody comment on whether this import is easier into MySQL or SQL
    Server. I have read some of the MS docs on this so called "Upsizing"
    and have been made aware of some of the many pitfalls. Just wondering
    whether MySQL has anything to speed up the import. Has anybody got an
    estimate of the time needed for such a "basic migration".

    Thanks,
    Chad

    Chad Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Migrating from Access

    > I have been tasked with migrating data from a large MS-Access DB to a 

    MS Access is a filesystem database. It is fundamentally different from a
    server database. Although access can mimic a server by sending SQL to
    itself and then parsing it again, this is off course not very nice in
    performing.
    If the forms are built with linked tables, the performance is probably
    not an issue anyway.
     

    I would not call switching from your own car to using public transport
    "upsizing", even though buses are bigger. Using MySQL or SQL Server is a
    matter of taste and experience (and money).

    For the migration, you can download MyODBC (for MySQL) and link the
    MySQL tables in Access. This is probably not the fastest way, but it is
    easy and gives you all the control you need, without having to switch to
    using new programs. And if you haven't heard of "pass-through" queries
    yet, read the MS Access helpfile on them.

    I can't estimate the time it takes you to set up a server and to learn
    to work with it. After that, the estimate is even more difficult: do the
    access forms still perform sufficiently? Should that be part the migration?

    Good luck,
    --
    Willem Bogaerts

    Application smith
    Kratz B.V.
    http://www.kratz.nl/
    Willem Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Migrating from Access



    The forms for sure need major improvement.
    Can anybody recommend a suitable open source replacement technology
    for the forms that will work with MySQL?

    Chad Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Migrating from Access

    Willem Bogaerts wrote: 
    >
    > MS Access is a filesystem database. It is fundamentally different from a
    > server database. Although access can mimic a server by sending SQL to
    > itself and then parsing it again, this is off course not very nice in
    > performing.
    > If the forms are built with linked tables, the performance is probably
    > not an issue anyway.
    >[/ref]

    Actually, to be correct, Access is an access mechanism to databases.
    For instance, it also works with MySQL as an ODBC database. What you
    are describing is the MS Jet Engine.

    But I've never tried using Access's linked tables with MySQL. It might
    work, however.
     
    >
    > I would not call switching from your own car to using public transport
    > "upsizing", even though buses are bigger. Using MySQL or SQL Server is a
    > matter of taste and experience (and money).
    >[/ref]

    More than that. They both have their own advantages and disadvantages.
    You need to look at the features you need and see which database
    satisfies them better. If both will do what you need, then you can look
    at cost, etc.
     

    Or use the MySQL Migration Toolkit, which was created just for
    requirements like this.
     

    Agreed. It depends on things from the database itself to the experience
    of the person doing the work.

    You might want to think of getting someone who has conversion
    experienced involved in this project. It's not all that difficult, but
    there are lots of ways to go wrong, also.
     

    Agreed.

    And I would also add - what about the user's programs? How are those
    going to be converted?

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.
    net
    ==================
    Jerry Guest

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