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My return to the hobby after a long absence - Photography

I was an avid 35mm photographer with a Minolta XG-7 in my later college days at the University of Rochester. I had taken images of everything from flower closeups to my present-day wife during our first years of dating. Except for a few prints in albums, most of these were stored in boxes and largely forgotten. I had many B&W negatives that had never even been printed due to being developed my myself in a college photo class. As my life went forward into my career, children, etc, and the advent of the digital age. The 35mm hobby survived a ...

  1. #1

    Default My return to the hobby after a long absence


    I was an avid 35mm photographer with a Minolta XG-7 in my later
    college days at the University of Rochester.

    I had taken images of everything from flower closeups to my
    present-day wife during our first years of dating.

    Except for a few prints in albums, most of these were stored in boxes
    and largely forgotten. I had many B&W negatives that had never even
    been printed due to being developed my myself in a college photo
    class.

    As my life went forward into my career, children, etc, and the advent
    of the digital age. The 35mm hobby survived a few years into my adult
    life, but was gradually displaced by the compact 35mm automatic (IMHO
    glorified Instamatic) cameras, and last year, A Sony Cyber Shot
    digital camera (also in ways an Instamatic).

    The first hints of what was to come was when I began taking some
    garden pictures with the Sony camera. I brought back memories of the
    XG-7. I realizied that digital photography was a great tool, but it
    lacked the soul and intimacy of 35mm.

    The watershed event was the purchase of an HP scanner by a family
    member. It was only $100, and I wondered just how good it could be. I
    began testing it on my old photos, and was jolted back to my past as I
    began seeing images of my wife and I leap out on my monitor in JPG
    format.

    Have any of you done this and found it to be emotionally
    gut-wrenching? For a few days, it was as if I had seen the most
    intense movie imaginable, and fallen in love with a character to the
    point of not being able to think about anything else.

    There is nothing like a 35mm image of a subject that has feelings for
    the photographer! I'm not talking anything dirty here, just everyday
    images. I also discovered that the format brings out the warmth and
    passion in other people as well, even strangers at times. The same is
    true for plants and animals, and even inatimate objects.

    There is no way my Sony digital camera could ever touch this.

    If you would like to see some of these scans, visit

    http://www.richardsfault.com/Rochester81.html

    Some of my digital efforts can be seen at

    http://www.richardsfault.com/autumn.html

    http://www.richardsfault.com/gardening.html




    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some people claim that there's a woman to blame, but I think it's all...

    Richard's fault!

    Visit the Sounds of the cul-de-sac at www.richardsfault.com
    richardsfault Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: My return to the hobby after a long absence

    Sony - No

    Canon Digital SLR - yes.
    http://www.canoneos.com/

    Dave



    "richardsfault" <com> wrote in message
    news:com...
    |
    | I was an avid 35mm photographer with a Minolta XG-7 in my later
    | college days at the University of Rochester.
    |
    | I had taken images of everything from flower closeups to my
    | present-day wife during our first years of dating.
    |
    | Except for a few prints in albums, most of these were stored in boxes
    | and largely forgotten. I had many B&W negatives that had never even
    | been printed due to being developed my myself in a college photo
    | class.
    |
    | As my life went forward into my career, children, etc, and the advent
    | of the digital age. The 35mm hobby survived a few years into my adult
    | life, but was gradually displaced by the compact 35mm automatic (IMHO
    | glorified Instamatic) cameras, and last year, A Sony Cyber Shot
    | digital camera (also in ways an Instamatic).
    |
    | The first hints of what was to come was when I began taking some
    | garden pictures with the Sony camera. I brought back memories of the
    | XG-7. I realizied that digital photography was a great tool, but it
    | lacked the soul and intimacy of 35mm.
    |
    | The watershed event was the purchase of an HP scanner by a family
    | member. It was only $100, and I wondered just how good it could be. I
    | began testing it on my old photos, and was jolted back to my past as I
    | began seeing images of my wife and I leap out on my monitor in JPG
    | format.
    |
    | Have any of you done this and found it to be emotionally
    | gut-wrenching? For a few days, it was as if I had seen the most
    | intense movie imaginable, and fallen in love with a character to the
    | point of not being able to think about anything else.
    |
    | There is nothing like a 35mm image of a subject that has feelings for
    | the photographer! I'm not talking anything dirty here, just everyday
    | images. I also discovered that the format brings out the warmth and
    | passion in other people as well, even strangers at times. The same is
    | true for plants and animals, and even inatimate objects.
    |
    | There is no way my Sony digital camera could ever touch this.
    |
    | If you would like to see some of these scans, visit
    |
    | http://www.richardsfault.com/Rochester81.html
    |
    | Some of my digital efforts can be seen at
    |
    | http://www.richardsfault.com/autumn.html
    |
    | http://www.richardsfault.com/gardening.html
    |
    |
    |
    |
    | ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    |
    | Some people claim that there's a woman to blame, but I think it's all...
    |
    | Richard's fault!
    |
    | Visit the Sounds of the cul-de-sac at www.richardsfault.com


    David Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: My return to the hobby after a long absence

    richardsfault wrote:
     
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

    In portuguese we have a word for it: "Saudade" :))

    I know that it is not so simple, but I bet many people will have more or
    less the same feeling some year from now when they look at the digital
    iamges they capture today.

    My best regards
    ... now I am going and take a look at your photos

    --
    al-Farrob
    --
    "16 photographs by al-Farrob"
    http://www.al-farrob.com
    al-Farrob Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: My return to the hobby after a long absence

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 01:40:08 GMT, "David H. Lipman"
    <DLipman~nospam~Verizon.Net> wrote:
     

    Or any other digital SLR, actually. If he happens to have Nikon lenses
    that he could use - get a Nikon SLR.

    But, if he has no previous lens system commitment, I agree, get a
    Canon SLR.
    Alex Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: My return to the hobby after a long absence

    richardsfault wrote:
     

    What you express is something completely personal, so it does not
    make much sense to agree or disagree, or claim that you are (or
    may be) wrong, etc.

    However, I claim that you're wrong :-)

    From what you describe, I get the impression that what you describe
    as the charm of film photography is nothing more than memories and
    nostalgia (nostalgia in a good sense, as what you describe refers
    to your present-day wife, so I'm assuming that none of those are
    "sad memories from a happy past") from what used to be a hobby
    that played an important role in a particularly important phase
    of your life (young, happy days in College, dating that wonderful
    person that is still with you today, etc.)

    If you look at the digital sensor of a digital camera as the
    equivalent, or the replacement of a negative (just the negative),
    what is then the difference between the both?? Why is there a
    "soul" to one of them and not the other one, when the only
    difference is how the molecules of weird and lifeless materials
    store what at a certain moment was an image you were seeing?

    A negative has chemicals that react to light, and permanently
    react into other chemicals, storing the image. A digital camera
    sensor has circuits that react to light, producing electricity,
    which leads to storing the image.

    "How can you be so cold?" you may say. I'm not being cold;
    I'm just describing how cameras work -- it's a cold, lifeless
    technological process; it's what *you* make out of it what has
    a certain life to it. (you can get art out of it, you can get
    joy out of it, etc.)

    And there is absolutely no reason why what you make out of it
    can't be the same with both technologies -- now careful, of
    course, you're comparing an actual camera (your XG-7) with a
    toy. From a digital camera, you can get prints (as I said, the
    sensor and storage are simply the equivalent to the negative.
    And from pictures taken with a film camera, you can get images
    on your computer. So, what's the diff?

    In fact, I find one detail in your message really surprising
    and even self-contradictory -- you're describing the experience
    of scanning and putting pictures on your monitor as a heavinly
    pleasuring experience... Why that sounds a lot to me like
    digital photography... The only difference is that if you had
    had a digital camera at that time, then you wouldn't have had
    to scan the pictures today -- they would have been ready to
    put on your computer monitor and enjoy the company of the
    person you love.

    Either way (digital or film), the important thing is that you
    enjoy your hobby! If you feel that they're different and prefer
    one of them, then go for it -- just keep in mind that film
    photography may have already a finite life span (5 years? 10?
    30 years? no-one knows, but surely 5 or 10 years from now you
    will have trouble finding photolabs with people competent enough
    in processing and printing films)
     

    Yes I would. I'm going to.

    Cheers,

    Carlos
    --
    Carlos Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: My return to the hobby after a long absence

    richardsfault wrote:
     

    Niiiiicee shots (some of them at least). Wow!!

    I particularly liked Dandelion Day-1980-11.jpg and the two
    that are next to it (to the right).

    The close-up of the face of the statue prank is also neat,
    although I'm a bit less crazy about B&W photography.

    Your style reminds me a lot of my brother's photographs;
    you must be about his age, I'm guessing, as he was graduating
    from College in 1980 (same year I was going to College).

    I got into the hobby more recently, though, and I think at
    some level, subconsciously, I always try to emulate his style.

    If you want to compare notes and take a look at my images
    (all taken with 35mm film camera -- I still do not have a
    digital camera! :-)), they are at:

    http://www.mochima.com/personal


    Some advice concering the pages: The images are quite large,
    and you're forcing a size in your HTML code. The browser
    does a resizing by stretching, which effectively reduces
    the quality of the image (it introduces weird artifacts
    like jaggy edges). When you right-click on it and select
    "View image", then you see it large size, and better quality).

    You may want to either leave them original size (in which case
    maybe you could resize them -- with anti-alising -- to a medium
    size), or resize to "thumbnail" smaller sizes and keep a link
    to the full-size images -- a bit more complicated)

    Given that some of the pages have lots of images, it may be
    worth using the thumbnail trick, given that it takes A LOT to
    download (and I do have a fast connection). The browser is
    also choking (the mouse is unresponsive, etc.) since it's
    having a hard time handling the lots of resizing of large
    images.

    Cheers,

    Carlos
    --
    Carlos Guest

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