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Nedit for OS-X - Mac Applications & Software

I seem to recall that there was at one time at least an OS-X version of Nedit, but poking around on nedit.org, I don't seem to find it. I see mention of it, but nothing on their download pages. Anybody know what the scoop is?...

  1. #1

    Default Nedit for OS-X

    I seem to recall that there was at one time at least an OS-X version of
    Nedit, but poking around on nedit.org, I don't seem to find it. I see
    mention of it, but nothing on their download pages. Anybody know what the
    scoop is?


    Gary Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <rr.com>,
    Gary Morrison <rr.com> wrote:
     

    On the Mac, we have the real thing: BBEdit. NEdit is great for those
    other, benighted, operating systems w/o BBEdit. :-| <-- grim look

    --
    You are what you eat, therefore, I'm a vegetable! Cows and chickens
    and Pop Tarts are too.
    Howard Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    Of the two, I personally prefer Nedit, but that's a matter of opinion of
    course.


    Gary Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    * Gary Morrison wrote: 

    There was never an NEdit binary for OS/X available for download at
    nedit.org. You can build it yourself from sources (there is a
    makefile for OS/X, so if you meet the build requirements simply
    `make macosx' should do it), or maybe get a binary from the fink
    project. But as nedit.org says, make sure it is build with a good
    Motif version (best is Openmotif 2.1.30, *not* any of the 2.2
    series, or Lesstif 93.91 or the older 93.18).

    Cheers,
    Jörg
    Joerg Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <rr.com>,
    Gary Morrison <rr.com> wrote:
     

    True, true.

    --
    You are what you eat, therefore, I'm a vegetable! Cows and chickens
    and Pop Tarts are too.
    Howard Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 6:50:50 +0200, Gary Morrison wrote
    (in message <rr.com>):
     

    See for instance

    http://www.entropy.ch/software/macosx/

    Requires Apple X11. I have it installed on my iMac under Apple's X11.

    --
    Stan.

    Stan Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    On 2003-10-18, Gary Morrison <rr.com> wrote: 

    An X11 version that runs in osx is trivial to install with fink. I
    haven't heard of a native aqua version, but then I haven't really
    been looking. I'd rather use emacs anyway.



    Hugh Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <ztQkb.320624$ops.asp.att.net>,
    Hugh Wolf <lieder.de> wrote:
     

    Oh, a masochist!

    --
    You are what you eat, therefore, I'm a vegetable! Cows and chickens
    and Pop Tarts are too.
    Howard Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In <newsguy.com> Howard Shubs wrote: 
    >
    > Oh, a masochist![/ref]

    No, smart. First it's native aqua, doesn't require X-windows like Nedit.
    Second, emacs is more powerful, even then the BBedit folks here seem to
    like.

    I work on many machines. I am guaranteed to find vi and & emacs on all
    of them. I just chose the best one as my favorite.

    All other editors are but pale shadows of the one true editor.

    How's that for religion?
    Robert Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <airnews.net>,
    Robert Love <net> wrote:
     

    I have to agree, but I'm not pushing TPU *or* EDT.

    --
    You are what you eat, therefore, I'm a vegetable! Cows and chickens
    and Pop Tarts are too.
    Howard Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    Robert Love <net> wrote in message news:<airnews.net>... 

    AFAIK OS/X consists of a Unix like kernel and uses the platform independent
    graphical network system X as its graphics system. Aqua is a toolkit/widget
    set owned by Apple. Now certainly NEdit is an X client, but why should a
    console application, with a toolkit linked in for some menus, be in what
    sense more native for OS/X? Why does it need no graphics, if it uses
    aqua? Or is there a second graphics system on OS/X?
    (If you link some other toolkits into emacs, like gtk on Linux for
    example, it certainly needs an X server to run just like NEdit always needs
    an X server.)
     

    Sure, more powerful as any non open source software. emacs' license allows
    that you add any feature to its source code (C and Lisp). But this is
    allowed for any open source software. This is really powerful ;-)
     

    I start to believe that you only blindly repeat arguments that you've
    read somewhere. What does you keep from running any application that
    you like on any system, especially on Unix systems?
    Of course, if you want to run emacs it will be good if it is installed
    already, otherwise you had quite some work to install it. But for small
    programs, a single binary that you only need to run, where is the
    problem? If it is not already there, it will be there in a minute or so.
     

    That is a very good religion, since it is purely based on (blind) beliefs.

    --Joerg
    J?rg Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    On 2003-10-22, J?rg <de> wrote: 

    The underlying graphics system in osx is Quartz, not X11. There is of
    course an X11 server for osx. It runs on top of Quartz.

     

    The previous poster was probably referring to the carbonization of
    emacs in the current cvs tree. Unlike the emacs Apple supplies, this
    is not console-only; it's fully windowed and uses the native osx
    windowing system.

    Fwiw there's also a carbon vi, in the form of gvim.

    Afaik nedit hasn't been ported to the native osx window system. As
    other posters have pointed out already, BBEdit more or less owns that
    territory already. But then BBdit isn't open-source freeware.

    As for the religion, emacs has plenty of downsides. It's legitimately
    been described as too big, too slow, too convoluted, too clunky, too
    full of features that have nothing to do with editing text, too hard
    on the wrists. But its power and flexibility compared to other text
    editors is a simple matter of fact. The religous question is whether
    the power it offers is useful enough to balance the cost of entry.

    Hugh Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    Hugh Wolf wrote: 
    >
    > The underlying graphics system in osx is Quartz, not X11. There is of
    > course an X11 server for osx. It runs on top of Quartz.
    >[/ref]

    Well, I was much too optimistic about what OS/X means. They only
    have a port of the Xfree86 implementation, which you can install
    additionally. The name OS/X is rather misleading here. There are
    ports of Xfree86 for OS/2 and Windows (Cygwin), too.

    Well, at least it allows you to run X clients somehow (hopefully it
    is quicker than Cygwin/Xfree).

    Cheers,
    Jörg
    Joerg Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In <google.com> J?rg wrote: 
    >
    > AFAIK OS/X consists of a Unix like kernel and uses the platform
    > independent graphical network system X as its graphics system. Aqua
    > is a toolkit/widget set owned by Apple. Now certainly NEdit is an X
    > client, but why should a console application, with a toolkit linked in
    > for some menus, be in what sense more native for OS/X?[/ref]

    You can run emacs as a pure termianl app, thats true, but there is
    an Aqua "front end", should you choose to use it. So you're showing
    a limited knowledge of the thing you're critiquing.

     
    >
    > Sure, more powerful as any non open source software. emacs' license
    > allows that you add any feature to its source code (C and Lisp). But
    > this is allowed for any open source software. This is really powerful ;-)[/ref]

    Again, you're showing large ignorance. For example, emacs comes with

    -- modes to support any language with indenting and colorizing,
    including
    English, C/C++/ObjC/ Fortran, Ada, Pascal, Cobol, HTML etc

    -- calendars that calculate the phase of the moon, and know holidays for
    US, Christian, Orthodox, Islam & Hewbrew. They can give the date in
    Gregorian, Mayan, French Revolutionary etc

    -- Read news & mail. Since this is mostly text, why not use an editor
    to compose and read other text communications.

    -- Act as a FTP or HTTP client.

    -- Speak text.

    There are add ons that perform symbolic algebra. I defiy you to show me
    any
    other editor that can take a symbolic derivative.

    It is mulitlingual, supporting oriental languages that are non-ascii and
    read right to left.


     
    >
    > I start to believe that you only blindly repeat arguments that you've[/ref]

    No, as I said, I actually use them. Reading comprehsion problems as
    well as limited knowledge?

     

    No, I have facts to back them up.


    Robert Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In <newsguy.com> Howard Shubs wrote: 
    >
    > I have to agree, but I'm not pushing TPU *or* EDT.
    >[/ref]


    That's why its called Editor Religion!
    Robert Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <airnews.net>,
    Robert Love <net> wrote:
     

    So you're saying I *should* be pushing TPU or EDT? Maybe "and"? 8-O

    --
    You are what you eat, therefore, I'm a vegetable! Cows and chickens
    and Pop Tarts are too.
    Howard Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <3f9695a9$0$12466$freenet.de>, Joerg Fischer wrote: 
    >>
    >> The underlying graphics system in osx is Quartz, not X11. There is of
    >> course an X11 server for osx. It runs on top of Quartz.
    >>[/ref]
    >
    > Well, I was much too optimistic about what OS/X means. They only
    > have a port of the Xfree86 implementation, which you can install
    > additionally. The name OS/X is rather misleading here. There are
    > ports of Xfree86 for OS/2 and Windows (Cygwin), too.
    >
    > Well, at least it allows you to run X clients somehow (hopefully it
    > is quicker than Cygwin/Xfree).[/ref]

    Depends on how you interpret the X in OS X. X is also Roman numeral 10,
    and OS X is the 10th Mac operating system.

    Apple does have a version of X11 that you can download for free, and I
    heard it will be packaged with OS X 10.3 (aka Panther). From what I've
    seen, it works very well.

    --

    -------------------- http://www.techhouse.org/lou ----------------------
    "Dragonmaster Lou" | "Searching for a distant star, heading off to
    lou at techhouse org | Iscandar, leaving all we love behind, who knows
    Tech House Alum | what dangers we'll find..."
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Dragonmaster Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <brown.edu>,
    Dragonmaster Lou <ME.AND.DIE.techhouse.org> wrote:
     

    Yeah, Apple marketing wasn't very bright with this name. They stress the
    X is 10 rather than "ekks" since it's the 10th version of the Mac OS.

    But what happens when they finally have to flip over the full digit to
    Version 11? "Mac OS Ten Version Eleven" sounds weird. Will it then
    become Mac OS XI? Even weirder, and worse yet when they reach something
    like Mac OS XVIII. We'll have to start wearing togas to use our Macs and
    talking in Latin.

    All too typical of marketing. Everything for the moment. No planning
    ahead or forseeing future problems. (I could also get into the stupidity
    of not giving computers names, forcing us to talk about their keyboards,
    ports, etc.)

    My hope is that they'll get realistic and make the X a letter rather
    than a number. I think the mystery surrounding an X is rather cool.

    --MP

    --
    ****************
    Preorder Lord of the Ring DVDs and videos.
    http://www.inklingbooks.com/
    ****************
    MP Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    Robert Love wrote: 

    Nope, emacs is a pure terminal app, see below.
     

    Let's see. Suppose that you would like to replace foo with baa in a
    column or rectangular region. My expectation of a mac-like editor
    would be that I point the mouse to the one corner of the rectangle
    and drag/select to the opposite corner. Then I hit a shortcut to
    open the replace dialog menu, where I give in foo and below baa and
    select the type of search and restrict it to the actual (block)
    selection. That's btw how you do it with NEdit.
    Now how do you achieve this task #1 with emacs/console and #2 with
    emacs/aqua (or emacs/gtk or whatever eye candy they offer)? Is there
    any difference between #1 and #2 in the way to do it?
    Can you do a real rectangular selection with emacs at all?
     
    >>
    >> Sure, more powerful as any non open source software. emacs' license
    >> allows that you add any feature to its source code (C and Lisp). But
    >> this is allowed for any open source software. This is really powerful ;-)[/ref]
    >
    > Again, you're showing large ignorance. For example, emacs comes with
    >
    > -- modes to support any language with indenting and colorizing,
    > including
    > English, C/C++/ObjC/ Fortran, Ada, Pascal, Cobol, HTML etc
    >
    > -- calendars that calculate the phase of the moon, and know holidays for
    > US, Christian, Orthodox, Islam & Hewbrew. They can give the date in
    > Gregorian, Mayan, French Revolutionary etc
    >
    > -- Read news & mail. Since this is mostly text, why not use an editor
    > to compose and read other text communications.
    >
    > -- Act as a FTP or HTTP client.
    >
    > -- Speak text.
    >
    > There are add ons that perform symbolic algebra. I defiy you to
    > show me any other editor that can take a symbolic derivative.[/ref]

    To summarize your whole effort, emacs is such a powerful editor
    because it is everything else.
     
    >>
    >> I start to believe that you only blindly repeat arguments that you've[/ref]
    >
    > No, as I said, I actually use them. Reading comprehsion problems as
    > well as limited knowledge?[/ref]

    Big enough knowledge to get my editor installed on any Unix or
    Windows box in a minute (if there is an internet connection - pretty
    standard today). So the argument, vi or emacs is always there
    whereas other editors may not be there, is rather boring.

    A better argument would be that a graphical editor cannot run on
    Unix - would be rather interesting to choose a graphical editor
    instead of a console editor, some vi clone usually, as *default*
    editor under Unix.
     
    >
    > No, I have facts to back them up.[/ref]

    That's what you believe *g*

    Cheers,
    Jörg
    Joerg Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Nedit for OS-X

    In article <brown.edu>,
    Dragonmaster Lou <ME.AND.DIE.techhouse.org> wrote:
     

    So, what do you think they'll do when they come out with the next major
    version of their OS? Will the space character become significant, or
    will they go straight to 12?

    --
    You are what you eat, therefore, I'm a vegetable! Cows and chickens
    and Pop Tarts are too.
    Howard Guest

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