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Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse - SCO

Hello, I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a directorie. But whitout converting the extention. An exemple : ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx I'm using CSH but I can use other shell. Thank U, Arkeos....

  1. #1

    Default Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse

    Hello,

    I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a
    directorie. But whitout converting the extention.
    An exemple :
    ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx

    I'm using CSH but I can use other shell.

    Thank U,

    Arkeos.



    Arkeos Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse

    Arkeos <bigbrotheranonymat.org> wrote:
    >Hello,
    >I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a
    >directorie. But whitout converting the extention.
    >An exemple :
    >ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx
    >I'm using CSH but I can use other shell.
    Well, that's your major problem. Csh is an awful shell. If you must
    use anything like that at all (and personally I cannot imagine why
    you would), at least use tcsh. But unless you just cannot get
    out of csh's awful habits, I'd strongly recommend switching to
    ksh or bash. Csh and its clones are used by two kinds of people:
    those who were unfortunate enough to have been exposed to it
    early on and just don't want to make the effort to learn something
    else (and who can blame them?) and wannabees who have the very mistaken
    impression that it's "cool". It ain't cool: it's clumsy, broken,
    and a major pita. The historical rationale was that it was good
    for users because of its history ability, which sh lacked. Other
    than that, it was (and is) an inferior shell. Since bash and ksh
    have more than adequate history AND retain and expand the superior
    scripting of sh, anyone not hopelessly habituated to csh semantics
    should use one of those.


    Second problem: there are better places to post this. Nothing
    about this has anything to do with SCO, and there are newsgroups
    that deal specifically with shell programming.

    Anyway: I'd use ksh or bash. Either have all the tools you need for this.

    No doubt you'll get a dozen scripts in response to this, some of which
    will probably even work, so I'm not going to add to that..

    --
    [email]tonyaplawrence.com[/email] Unix/Linux/Mac OS X resources: [url]http://aplawrence.com[/url]
    Get paid for writing about tech: [url]http://aplawrence.com/publish.html[/url]



    tony@aplawrence.com Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse

    Tony Lawrence typed (on Mon, Jul 21, 2003 at 02:48:30PM +0000):
    | Arkeos <bigbrotheranonymat.org> wrote:
    | >I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a
    | >directorie. But whitout converting the extention.
    | >An exemple :
    | >ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx
    |
    | >I'm using CSH but I can use other shell.
    |
    | Well, that's your major problem. Csh is an awful shell. If you must
    | use anything like that at all (and personally I cannot imagine why
    | you would), at least use tcsh. But unless you just cannot get
    | out of csh's awful habits, I'd strongly recommend switching to
    | ksh or bash. Csh and its clones are used by two kinds of people:
    | those who were unfortunate enough to have been exposed to it
    | early on and just don't want to make the effort to learn something
    | else (and who can blame them?) and wannabees who have the very mistaken
    | impression that it's "cool". It ain't cool: it's clumsy, broken,
    | and a major pita. The historical rationale was that it was good
    | for users because of its history ability, which sh lacked. Other
    | than that, it was (and is) an inferior shell. Since bash and ksh
    | have more than adequate history AND retain and expand the superior
    | scripting of sh, anyone not hopelessly habituated to csh semantics
    | should use one of those.


    I don't consider myself unfortunate in the least, and I find myself
    extremely productive with tcsh as my login shell everywhere I have any
    control over it.

    OTOH, I have written exactly one csh script in my life, and thousands of
    sh or ksh scripts.


    --
    JP
    Jean-Pierre Radley Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse

    Jean-Pierre Radley <jprjpr.com> wrote:
    >Tony Lawrence typed (on Mon, Jul 21, 2003 at 02:48:30PM +0000):
    >| Arkeos <bigbrotheranonymat.org> wrote:
    >| >I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a
    >| >directorie. But whitout converting the extention.
    >| >An exemple :
    >| >ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx
    >|
    >| >I'm using CSH but I can use other shell.
    >|
    >| Well, that's your major problem. Csh is an awful shell. If you must
    >| use anything like that at all (and personally I cannot imagine why
    >| you would), at least use tcsh. But unless you just cannot get
    >| out of csh's awful habits, I'd strongly recommend switching to
    >| ksh or bash. Csh and its clones are used by two kinds of people:
    >| those who were unfortunate enough to have been exposed to it
    >| early on and just don't want to make the effort to learn something
    >| else (and who can blame them?) and wannabees who have the very mistaken
    >| impression that it's "cool". It ain't cool: it's clumsy, broken,
    >| and a major pita. The historical rationale was that it was good
    >| for users because of its history ability, which sh lacked. Other
    >| than that, it was (and is) an inferior shell. Since bash and ksh
    >| have more than adequate history AND retain and expand the superior
    >| scripting of sh, anyone not hopelessly habituated to csh semantics
    >| should use one of those.
    >I don't consider myself unfortunate in the least, and I find myself
    >extremely productive with tcsh as my login shell everywhere I have any
    >control over it.
    We'll disagree on how unfortunate you are :-)
    >OTOH, I have written exactly one csh script in my life, and thousands of
    >sh or ksh scripts.
    As I said, if you are accustomed to using it, and don't mind having
    to knopw two shells if you do scripts, fine.

    But I certainly don't recommend that to someone with no existing
    experience.

    --
    [email]tonyaplawrence.com[/email] Unix/Linux/Mac OS X resources: [url]http://aplawrence.com[/url]
    Get paid for writing about tech: [url]http://aplawrence.com/publish.html[/url]
    tony@aplawrence.com Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse

    In article <20030721194728.GD4336jpradley.jpr.com>,
    Jean-Pierre Radley <jprjpr.com> wrote:
    >Tony Lawrence typed (on Mon, Jul 21, 2003 at 02:48:30PM +0000):
    >| Arkeos <bigbrotheranonymat.org> wrote:
    >| >I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a
    >| >directorie. But whitout converting the extention.
    >| >An exemple :
    >| >ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx
    >|
    >| >I'm using CSH but I can use other shell.
    >|
    >| Well, that's your major problem. Csh is an awful shell. If you must
    >| use anything like that at all (and personally I cannot imagine why
    >| you would), at least use tcsh. But unless you just cannot get
    >| out of csh's awful habits, I'd strongly recommend switching to
    >| ksh or bash. Csh and its clones are used by two kinds of people:
    >| those who were unfortunate enough to have been exposed to it
    >| early on and just don't want to make the effort to learn something
    >| else (and who can blame them?) and wannabees who have the very mistaken
    >| impression that it's "cool". It ain't cool: it's clumsy, broken,
    >| and a major pita. The historical rationale was that it was good
    >| for users because of its history ability, which sh lacked. Other
    >| than that, it was (and is) an inferior shell. Since bash and ksh
    >| have more than adequate history AND retain and expand the superior
    >| scripting of sh, anyone not hopelessly habituated to csh semantics
    >| should use one of those.
    >I don't consider myself unfortunate in the least, and I find myself
    >extremely productive with tcsh as my login shell everywhere I have any
    >control over it.
    Well tcsh is not quite the same as csh - thankfully :-)


    ========================================
    THE T IN TCSH
    In 1964, DEC produced the PDP-6. The PDP-10 was a later re-implementa-
    tion. It was re-christened the DECsystem-10 in 1970 or so when DEC
    brought out the second model, the KI10.

    TENEX was created at Bolt, Beranek & Newman (a Cambridge, Massachusetts
    think tank) in 1972 as an experiment in demand-paged virtual memory
    operating systems. They built a new pager for the DEC PDP-10 and cre-
    ated the OS to go with it. It was extremely successful in academia.

    In 1975, DEC brought out a new model of the PDP-10, the KL10; they
    intended to have only a version of TENEX, which they had licensed from
    BBN, for the new box. They called their version TOPS-20 (their capi-
    talization is trademarked). A lot of TOPS-10 users (`The OPerating
    System for PDP-10') objected; thus DEC found themselves supporting two
    incompatible systems on the same hardware--but then there were 6 on the
    PDP-11!

    TENEX, and TOPS-20 to version 3, had command completion via a user-
    code-level subroutine library called ULTCMD. With version 3, DEC moved
    all that capability and more into the monitor (`kernel' for you Unix
    types), accessed by the COMND% JSYS (`Jump to SYStem' instruction, the
    supervisor call mechanism [are my IBM roots also showing?]).

    The creator of tcsh was impressed by this feature and several others of
    TENEX and TOPS-20, and created a version of csh which mimicked them.


    ========================================
    Bill
    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv wjv . com
    Bill Vermillion Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Need a script to convert Uppercase in Lowercasse

    Arkeos wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I need a script that convert Uppercasse in Lowercasse all files in a
    > directorie. But whitout converting the extention.
    > An exemple :
    > ABCDE.zYx becomes abcde.zYx
    >
    > I'm using CSH but I can use other shell.
    >
    > Thank U,
    >
    > Arkeos.
    >
    >
    Look at [url]www.arriscad.com[/url], under support. I believe that there is a
    script in the SCO conversion utilities called 'lowercase' which will
    almost do what you want. It does convert the extension to lower case as
    well. But you could probably modify it. It checks for duplicate file
    names and adds a number. It also does some other stuff, which you won't
    need, related to their software package.

    --
    Rob

    "Never ascribe to malice that which can be adequately explained by
    stupidity"

    Rob Guest

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