/\/ / / _______ ___________ __________ | | | | | |---- Mac G4 ____| DSL |____| Airport |____| 10/100 |---- Mac Quadra | Modem | | Base | | Ethernet |---- Mac SE ^ | | ^ | Station | ^ | Hub |---- Linux PC | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- DOS PC | | | ^ | | | | | | | | phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet line \ \ \/\ <---- WiFi \ \ ___________ | | | AirPort | | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts) | Macintosh | |___________| The other possibility is to keep your gateway router and let the AirPort simply provide wireless access to the private LAN. This ends up looking a lot like the non-wireless configuration: _______ ___________ __________ | | | | | |---- Mac G4 ____| DSL |____| Router |____| 10/100 |---- ... | Modem | | (Linksys) | | Ethernet |---- Other hosts ^ | | ^ | BEFSR11) | ^ | Hub | | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- AirPort base station | | | ^ \ | | | | \ | | | | \/\ \ phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet ^ \ line | | \ WiFi \ \/\ <---- WiFi \ \ ___________ | | | AirPort | | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts) | Macintosh | |___________| Hope this helps. -- David [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => [ref] => <110820031045176108%macho@mac.com> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => David C. [ip] => shamino@techie. [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [avwidth] => [avheight] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 7 [islastshown] => [isfirstshown] => [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) --> /\/ > / > / > _______ ___________ __________ > | | | | | |---- Mac G4 >____| DSL |____| Airport |____| 10/100 |---- Mac Quadra > | Modem | | Base | | Ethernet |---- Mac SE > ^ | | ^ | Station | ^ | Hub |---- Linux PC > | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- DOS PC > | | | ^ > | | | | > | | | | > >phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet >line > > > \ > \ > \/\ <---- WiFi > \ > \ > ___________ > | | > | AirPort | > | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts) > | Macintosh | > |___________| > > >The other possibility is to keep your gateway router and let the >AirPort simply provide wireless access to the private LAN. This ends >up looking a lot like the non-wireless configuration: > > _______ ___________ __________ > | | | | | |---- Mac G4 >____| DSL |____| Router |____| 10/100 |---- ... > | Modem | | (Linksys) | | Ethernet |---- Other hosts > ^ | | ^ | BEFSR11) | ^ | Hub | > | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- AirPort base station > | | | ^ \ > | | | | \ > | | | | \/\ > \ >phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet ^ \ >line | > | > > \ WiFi > \ > \/\ <---- WiFi > \ > \ > ___________ > | | > | AirPort | > | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts) > | Macintosh | > |___________| > > >Hope this helps. > >-- David[/quote] That's very helpful, David. Thanks for taking the trouble. Stan [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => <210820030834012284%macho@mac.com> [ref] => <110820031045176108%macho@mac.com> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => Stan The Man [ip] => macho@mac.com [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [avwidth] => [avheight] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 8 [islastshown] => 1 [isfirstshown] => [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) --> New DSL user, need a simple walk-through - Mac Networking

New DSL user, need a simple walk-through - Mac Networking

On Sat, 09 Aug 2003 16:51:48 -0500, CarolJude (caroljuderemovethis_highstream.net) wrote: > We just ordered ATT Worldnet service, and I know we can have multiple > users on one account simultaneously and that I need a DSL networking > router, but I have some questions and I cannot access the Worldnet > newsgroups on my news server or Google. I'm hopoing someone can give me > a short walk-through in hooking everything up. Hi Carol, We have a setup at home that is similar to what you will have in a short while. I have diagrammed our setup below -- I ...

  1. #1

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    On Sat, 09 Aug 2003 16:51:48 -0500,
    CarolJude (caroljuderemovethis_highstream.net) wrote:
    > We just ordered ATT Worldnet service, and I know we can have multiple
    > users on one account simultaneously and that I need a DSL networking
    > router, but I have some questions and I cannot access the Worldnet
    > newsgroups on my news server or Google. I'm hopoing someone can give me
    > a short walk-through in hooking everything up.
    Hi Carol,

    We have a setup at home that is similar to what you will have in a
    short while. I have diagrammed our setup below -- I hope it shows up
    okay, and makes things a little clearer.

    _______________ ______________
    | DSL | | DSL router |========== Linux PC
    ------------| modem |==========| Netgear |.......... XP notebook
    (phone- |_____________| (10/100 | MR314 |.......... PB-G3
    line) ethernet)|____________|

    The DSL modem (Speedstream 5100, provided by SBC) is connected to
    the incoming phone-line. The modem is connected via an ethernet
    cable (10baseT) to the DSL router (Netgear MR314).

    The MR314 is a wireless router, but it also has four 10/100 ports.
    I have a Linux PC connected to one of the ports, and we have a Dell
    notebook, and a Powerbook G3 connected to the wireless port of the
    router (indicated as "........").

    The MR314 is the only device configured to control the PPPoE
    connection through the Speedstream modem, and it gets configured
    through a web interface. The Linux PC, the Mac and XP notebook
    get IP addresses assigned via DHCP from the MR314. All these
    addresses are internal LAN addresses (192.168.0.0/24 range).

    The MR314 basically as two IP addresses. One that is assigned by
    dynamically by SBC, and the other on the internal LAN (192.168.0.1).
    It supports NAT, so although the Linux PC, XP book, and PB/G3 are
    assigned addresses in the 192.168.0.x range, they get "automagic"
    internet access through the NAT function of the MR314. None of
    these three computers had to be configured for PPPoE.
    > Any recommendations for a good mac-friendly inexpensive router? It looks
    > like they're mostly $40 and up.
    We purchased the MR314 for $50 -- since then I've seen much cheaper
    DSL routers that support wireless and hardwired connections on Ebay.

    I like the MR314 because it supports routing AppleTalk between the
    LAN interface, and the wireless interface, which allows me to see
    my folders on the Linux PC using AppleTalk. But there are lots of
    other DSL routers that support AppleTalk, and may be cheaper.

    Hope this makes things a little clearer.

    Regards,
    Beverly
    --
    Bev A. Kupf
    "The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne" -- Chaucer
    Bev A. Kupf Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    In article <caroljude-717674.16514809082003news.highstream.net>,
    CarolJude <caroljuderemovethis_highstream.net> wrote:
    > The phone line goes into the router, which then branches out to our
    > three computers, correct?
    Generally, no. The phone line goes into the modem. The modem plugs
    into the router. Your computers then plug into the router.

    You can get boxes that include DSL modems and a router in the same box
    (Speakeasy sent me one when I signed up for their service), but if your
    ISP is providing you with a single-user modem, then you should just use
    that and get a router without a built-in modem.
    > Do we all set up our ARA/PPP/OT/Modem
    > configurations with my account name and password, DNS addresses and
    > dialup number and then all dial in to connect, or do I dial in and then,
    > magically, everyone is then connected?
    No, the router will do this for you. You will configure the router to
    do PPP over Ethernet (which it sounds like your ISP uses), then the
    other computers will just connect without PPP. By default the router
    will be set up to be a DHCP server, which means the computers will
    automatically get their address, gateway, and probably DNS information
    from the router after being configured to do so.
    > Is it something that needs to be
    > done each time the computers are started up, or is it really and truly
    > 'always on' once I dial in for the first time?
    Again, you won't need to dial in. The router will "dial in" (it's not
    really dialing anything) when you make an Internet request. That means
    the first time you make an Internet request in a session, it might take
    a couple of extra seconds. The connection will remain up until your
    ISP times you out for inactivity because you're not using the Internet
    (you might be able to configure the router to drop the connection after
    a period of inactivity as well, depends on the router).
    > I was part of a routed cable connection not too long ago, and just
    > needed to set up my ethernet preferences and such once, after that I
    > just started up and opened up IE (or whatever), the connection was there
    > without using any connection-related apps or control panels. Is a DSL
    > similar in this respect?
    >
    > Any recommendations for a good mac-friendly inexpensive router? It looks
    > like they're mostly $40 and up.
    I recommend the Netgear products. They're affordable, and while
    they're not the the very easiest to set up, particularly if you have
    special needs, you'll only need to tweak one or two things anyway for
    your setup. And I've found Netgear products to be very reliable.

    --
    Jerry Kindall, Seattle, WA <http://www.jerrykindall.com/>

    When replying by e-mail, use plain text ONLY to make sure I read it.
    Due to spam and viruses, I filter all mail with HTML or attachments.
    Jerry Kindall Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    CarolJude <caroljuderemovethis_highstream.net> wrote:
    > Howdy,
    >
    > I am a Mac user of 8 years but am brand new to the world of DSL (in
    > fact, we just ordered service today). I live in a household of three
    > separate computer users, up until now we have used the outdated
    > 'wait-until-the-phone-line-is-free' system of connecting to the
    > internet. (I do my bandwidth-intensive work at work)
    >
    > We just ordered ATT Worldnet service, and I know we can have multiple
    > users on one account simultaneously and that I need a DSL networking
    > router, but I have some questions and I cannot access the Worldnet
    > newsgroups on my news server or Google. I'm hopoing someone can give me
    > a short walk-through in hooking everything up.
    >
    > We have two iMacs, with a third as-yet-undetermined computer (likely PC)
    > moving in in September. I know how to get MY computer hooked into the
    > DSL connection, but once we have the router, it seems to me that we will
    > all be dialing in on the same access number and somehow that doesn't
    > seem like it's correct.
    >
    > The phone line goes into the router, which then branches out to our
    > three computers, correct? Do we all set up our ARA/PPP/OT/Modem
    > configurations with my account name and password, DNS addresses and
    > dialup number and then all dial in to connect, or do I dial in and then,
    > magically, everyone is then connected? Is it something that needs to be
    > done each time the computers are started up, or is it really and truly
    > 'always on' once I dial in for the first time?
    >
    > I was part of a routed cable connection not too long ago, and just
    > needed to set up my ethernet preferences and such once, after that I
    > just started up and opened up IE (or whatever), the connection was there
    > without using any connection-related apps or control panels. Is a DSL
    > similar in this respect?
    >
    > Any recommendations for a good mac-friendly inexpensive router? It looks
    > like they're mostly $40 and up.
    >
    > Thanks to all for your help in this. I consider myself quite computer
    > literate but just never needed to know much, if anything, about this
    > before and it seems the more I research, the more confused I am, lol.

    A DSL service is indeed 'always on' and there is no dial-up required.
    If you use a simple DSL modem connected to a single computer then the
    computer uses its 'Remote Access' control panel as if there was an
    actual dial-up needed and the modem itself doesn't connect until you
    tell it to. This is cheap and simple but not very convenient for most
    people - and a nightmare where multiple connections are required.

    The best course of action (and one ALWAYS recommended for the Mac) is to
    use a Router/Modem as you indicated above. This connects to the DSL
    line and sends the username/password combination to your DSL provider as
    sooin as it is switched on (one then normally keeps it on even if the
    computers are switched off overnight).

    Some routers have a built-in 4-port hub (or switch) whilst others have a
    single LAN side ethernet connection for connection to a separate
    hub/switch. The hub/switch is wired to the Ethernet ports of each of
    the computers.

    Each computer is set up with its own unique IP address (within the same
    sub-net as the LAN port of the router). The IP address of the router is
    entered as the Gateway address and your ISP's DNS servers are listed on
    each computer (on the Mac all this is done in the TCP/IP Control Panel).

    Now all the computers can share the single line to the DSL provider and
    on to their ISPs. Note though that they will share the bandwidth, so if
    one person is downloading a particularly large file the others may
    notice a reduction of speed.

    Most routers have a web based setup facility which is therefore
    compatible with any Mac. Just ensure that the router you buy doesn't
    _require_ use of a 'console' port as these are PC serial type
    connections that the mac cannot do.
    Vernon Quaintance Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    On Sat, 09 Aug 2003 14:27:05 -0700,
    Jerry Kindall (jerrykindallnospam.invalid) wrote:
    > I recommend the Netgear products.
    I couldn't agree with you more. Our Netgear has worked reliably
    from day one.

    Bev
    --
    Bev A. Kupf
    "The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne" -- Chaucer
    Bev A. Kupf Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    In article <caroljude-AD997B.17225409082003news.highstream.net>,
    CarolJude <caroljuderemovethis_highstream.net> wrote:
    > Now it's totally obvious to me.
    I set up a LAN similar to yours (1 OS9 Mac, two PCs). The computers all
    feed into a D-Link hub (8-port with backbone support, bought used for
    $5) and the hub feeds into the uplink port on the router--a very nice
    Linksys BEFSR41 4-port that someone gave me for free since they had just
    gone wireless in their house. The Linksys sounds very much like the
    Netgear device others are using, even down to the same IP address.

    One of the neat things is that the Mac can be set up as a web server and
    an FTP server, so the PCs on the LAN can access the files there
    (depending on your settings in the Filesharing control panel). It's
    really very cool; the next thing for that particular network is an
    ethernet laser printer feeding into the hub so that everyone on the LAN
    can use it.

    BTW, once you've configured the Macs to work on the LAN, setting up the
    PC is a no-brainer.
    bearclaw@cruller.invalid Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    Loving the artwork ;-). Could someone please insert an Airport base
    station into the mix for a totally wireless 2xMac/2xPC LAN? TIA.

    Stan

    In article <m2adahw6of.fsfqqqq.invalid>, David C. <shaminotechie.com>
    wrote:
    >"Bev A. Kupf" <bevakupfebv.mimnet.northwestern.edu> writes:
    >>
    >> _______________ ______________
    >> | DSL | | DSL router |========== Linux PC
    >> ------------| modem |==========| Netgear |.......... XP notebook
    >> (phone- |_____________| (10/100 | MR314 |.......... PB-G3
    >> line) ethernet)|____________|
    >
    >My LAN is similar, but I have a 1-port router and a separate hub. My
    >LAN looks something like this:
    >
    > _______ ___________ __________
    > | | | | | |---- Mac G4
    >____| DSL |____| Router |____| 10/100 |---- Mac Quadra
    > | Modem | | (Linksys) | | Ethernet |---- Mac SE
    > ^ | | ^ | BEFSR11) | ^ | Hub |---- Linux PC
    > | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- DOS PC
    > | | | ^
    > | | | |
    > | | | |
    >
    >phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet
    >line
    >
    >Some routers have multiple Ethernet ports. This eliminates the need
    >for the hub, if you have enough ports for all your computers.
    >
    >Note, however, that most of the time an inexpensive multi-port router
    >is really a single-port router and a hub that are simply in one box
    >together. So if you already have an Ethernet hub, you don't lose
    >anything by using it with a single-port router (and saving a few
    >dollars in the process.)
    >
    >Anyway, after it's all physically connected, here's how to set up the
    >data-plane:
    >
    >1: Assign each host (the three Macs and two PCs in my case) addresses
    > in the router's private address space. Check the router's manual
    > to find out what that is. For the Linksys, this is 192.168.1.*.
    > Three addresse are reserved - .0 is the null address, .1 is used
    > by the router and .255 is your local broadcast address. Anything
    > else is OK. I use the following:
    >
    > 192.168.1.2 - Mac Quadra
    > 192.168.1.3 - Linux PC
    > 192.168.1.4 - DOS PC
    > 192.168.1.5 - Mac G4
    > 192.168.1.6 - Mac SE
    >
    > For each host, use 192.168.1.1 (or whatever the router's address
    > is) for your gateway/router address. Use 255.255.255.0 for your
    > subnet mask. Use your ISP-provided addresses for DNS (your ISP's
    > doentation or will probably list them somewhere. If not, their
    > customer support phone number should have them.)
    >
    > PPPoE should be turned off. If your ISP uses PPPoE, the router
    > will deal with it. The connection between the router and hosts
    > are straight IP-over-Ethernet, meaning you should not require any
    > special software or device drivers to make it all work.
    >
    > Enter these parameters into the appropriate control panel/config
    > file, as appropriate for the OS that each computer is using.
    >
    >2: Configure the router. Most consumer-orieneted routers have a web
    > interface. Launch your favorite browser and go to
    > [url]http://192.168.1.1/[/url] (or whatever the router's address is).
    > Configure it for your ISP. For my ISP (Earthlink), this means
    > turning on PPPoE and entering my username and password.
    >
    > Some routers may also have a text-based configuration system
    > accessible via telnet or a seral-port connection. The owner's
    > manual for the router will tell you the correct method and how to
    > enter the configuration parameters.
    >
    >3: Have fun. Your computers are now on the internet whenever they're
    > turned on. The router will deal with disconnecting and
    > reconnecting as needed. You can simply run your favorite internet
    > apps (web browsers, mail clients, etc.) at any time.
    >
    >Once all this is working, there is no longer a need to use the
    >computers' internal modems. You can disconnect them if you like.
    >(Or leave them connected if you want them for non-internet purposes,
    >like sending faxes or something.)
    >
    >You can configure your computers to use DHCP and avoid having to
    >assign addresses, but I recommend against it. I use my LAN to
    >connect my computers to each other in addition to connecting them all
    >to the internet. It's a real pain connecting to one of my own
    >computers if its address sometimes changes.
    >
    >-- David
    Stan The Man Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    Stan The Man <machomac.com> writes:
    >
    > Loving the artwork ;-). Could someone please insert an Airport base
    > station into the mix for a totally wireless 2xMac/2xPC LAN? TIA.
    Good thing I enjoy ASCII art :-)

    Two different ways to do this.

    One is to use the base station as your gatway router. I think it can
    be configured for this. In which case, your LAN will look like:

    /
    /
    WiFi ------> /\/
    /
    /
    _______ ___________ __________
    | | | | | |---- Mac G4
    ____| DSL |____| Airport |____| 10/100 |---- Mac Quadra
    | Modem | | Base | | Ethernet |---- Mac SE
    ^ | | ^ | Station | ^ | Hub |---- Linux PC
    | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- DOS PC
    | | | ^
    | | | |
    | | | |

    phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet
    line


    \
    \
    \/\ <---- WiFi
    \
    \
    ___________
    | |
    | AirPort |
    | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts)
    | Macintosh |
    |___________|


    The other possibility is to keep your gateway router and let the
    AirPort simply provide wireless access to the private LAN. This ends
    up looking a lot like the non-wireless configuration:

    _______ ___________ __________
    | | | | | |---- Mac G4
    ____| DSL |____| Router |____| 10/100 |---- ...
    | Modem | | (Linksys) | | Ethernet |---- Other hosts
    ^ | | ^ | BEFSR11) | ^ | Hub |
    | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- AirPort base station
    | | | ^ \
    | | | | \
    | | | | \/\
    \
    phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet ^ \
    line |
    |

    \ WiFi
    \
    \/\ <---- WiFi
    \
    \
    ___________
    | |
    | AirPort |
    | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts)
    | Macintosh |
    |___________|


    Hope this helps.

    -- David
    David C. Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: New DSL user, need a simple walk-through

    In article <m23cfvhjkw.fsfqqqq.invalid>, David C. <shaminotechie.com>
    wrote:
    >Stan The Man <machomac.com> writes:
    >>
    >> Loving the artwork ;-). Could someone please insert an Airport base
    >> station into the mix for a totally wireless 2xMac/2xPC LAN? TIA.
    >
    >Good thing I enjoy ASCII art :-)
    >
    >Two different ways to do this.
    >
    >One is to use the base station as your gatway router. I think it can
    >be configured for this. In which case, your LAN will look like:
    >
    > /
    > /
    > WiFi ------> /\/
    > /
    > /
    > _______ ___________ __________
    > | | | | | |---- Mac G4
    >____| DSL |____| Airport |____| 10/100 |---- Mac Quadra
    > | Modem | | Base | | Ethernet |---- Mac SE
    > ^ | | ^ | Station | ^ | Hub |---- Linux PC
    > | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- DOS PC
    > | | | ^
    > | | | |
    > | | | |
    >
    >phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet
    >line
    >
    >
    > \
    > \
    > \/\ <---- WiFi
    > \
    > \
    > ___________
    > | |
    > | AirPort |
    > | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts)
    > | Macintosh |
    > |___________|
    >
    >
    >The other possibility is to keep your gateway router and let the
    >AirPort simply provide wireless access to the private LAN. This ends
    >up looking a lot like the non-wireless configuration:
    >
    > _______ ___________ __________
    > | | | | | |---- Mac G4
    >____| DSL |____| Router |____| 10/100 |---- ...
    > | Modem | | (Linksys) | | Ethernet |---- Other hosts
    > ^ | | ^ | BEFSR11) | ^ | Hub |
    > | |_______| | |___________| | |__________|---- AirPort base station
    > | | | ^ \
    > | | | | \
    > | | | | \/\
    > \
    >phone Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet ^ \
    >line |
    > |
    >
    > \ WiFi
    > \
    > \/\ <---- WiFi
    > \
    > \
    > ___________
    > | |
    > | AirPort |
    > | Equipped | . . . (Repeat as necessary for all your WiFi hosts)
    > | Macintosh |
    > |___________|
    >
    >
    >Hope this helps.
    >
    >-- David
    That's very helpful, David. Thanks for taking the trouble.

    Stan
    Stan The Man Guest

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